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In Brazil for work. Could I buy some fretboard material and from whom?

coffeecupman

Member
Messages
227
You just complained about a post from one of people most likely to contribute useful information.
If he's going to start by saying what an idiot I am for investigating BR, and then when I ask him to calm down, he deletes his post, then who cares what he knows?
 

slowerhand

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,147
If he's going to start by saying what an idiot I am for investigating BR, and then when I ask him to calm down, he deletes his post, then who cares what he knows?
You came here asking for information. Don't act so intolerant if it's not what you like.
 

coffeecupman

Member
Messages
227
You came here asking for information. Don't act so intolerant if it's not what you like.
There is a difference between intolerance, and not needing to take **** from strangers on the internet.

I know that difference, and if you think I'm in the wrong, I'm happy to agree to disagree.
 

John Coloccia

Cold Supporting Member
Messages
9,580
For the benefit of anyone else, what I said was something very close to"OMG, this sounds like a bad idea with very little upside other than being able to say it's made from BR. And also, you might have trouble finding a good luthier willing to touch the stuff from a random guy off the street, regardless of your paperwork."

And all of that is true. Fortunately, BR doesn't have magical qualities, anymore than Chestnut did for carpentry and furniture building, and guitar building has continued to march forward and improve every year without it. Sorry for raining on the parade. Just trying to keep you from going through a lot of trouble, with no upside and potentially ending up with some very expensive firewood.
 

coffeecupman

Member
Messages
227
Thanks for returning John.

I'm actually very agreeable, and would prefer to forget the bad start.

Your comments above have been similar to others, and as stated above, the overall consensus seems like it's not worth doing.

I already have one world class luthier (at least) who would build with it, who shall remain nameless.

BR is famous, obviously. I assumed it got its good reputation because it was ideal for purpose. And I'm here. Fair enough that regulations make this untenable, but I admit the idea that "It's a crazy idea to investigate getting what everyone has said for years is the best fretboard wood in history" sounds a little weird on a board where we debate the thickness of paint.
 

Ayrton

Member
Messages
1,907
Quality BRZ is beautiful, but not all of it will be the end all be all of sound. I have some Cocobolo boards and look better and rings like bells compared to my small BRZ stock.

Rosewood got used because it was cheap and plentiful, but it certainly is not the only choice for a guitar.
 

Jerrod

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
12,818
IME and IMO, Braz is overrated. Can it be great? Sure. Can other varieties of rosewood be great? Yep. It doesn't help much now, but the Madagascar rosewood on a TA guitar I had forever ago was my fave rosewood board ever. But ziricote is dreamy too.
 

John Coloccia

Cold Supporting Member
Messages
9,580
Quality BRZ is beautiful, but not all of it will be the end all be all of sound. I have some Cocobolo boards and look better and rings like bells compared to my small BRZ stock.

Rosewood got used because it was cheap and plentiful, but it certainly is not the only choice for a guitar.
FWIW, I settled on Pau Ferro for my go-to fingerboard. Works beautifully with how I built my necks, for whatever reason. Just always worked and sounded really nice in the finished guitar. And there it is, right? It's all about how the wood matches up with the specific guitar and construction techniques, and we're talking fine tuning here anyway.
 

Ayrton

Member
Messages
1,907
FWIW, I settled on Pau Ferro for my go-to fingerboard. Works beautifully with how I built my necks, for whatever reason. Just always worked and sounded really nice in the finished guitar. And there it is, right? It's all about how the wood matches up with the specific guitar and construction techniques, and we're talking fine tuning here anyway.
Absolutely, and there are some beautiful looking boards out there.
 

coffeecupman

Member
Messages
227
The other thing to think about is that while Brazil is very beautiful, it's pretty dangerous. It has one of the highest, if not the highest murder rate in the world. Be careful while you're there!
Thanks, and you are right. I've been here before, about 10 years ago. Not much has changed in that regard.

But I do work all over the world, and regularly in places that aren't nice. So I'm covered on the street smarts front ;)
 

Coolidge

Platinum Supporting Member
Vendor
Messages
2,134
I'm sorry to hear you injured both your legs. I recommend you splint them before returning to the USA. I'm sure you can find some appropriate wood strips for that.
 

AltecGreen

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
1,186
I am asking how to do it, and can it be done - legally - and with/from whom.

I need a lot of paperwork. Great, what paperwork? Anyone know who to ask what paperwork, or how to contact the people who know?

I would not even attempt to buy anything harvested after June 11, 1992 (the convention date).

For pre-convention products listed in Appendix I, you will an official CITES document certifying the product was harvested pre-convention. This has to come from the Brazilian government so you need to figure out which Brazilian government department is responsible and their process. The process varies from country to country. Even in a country as efficient as Japan, it takes 3-4 four weeks to process the paperwork. I can't imagine it being faster or smoother than Japan.

Also remember that you are trying to deal in lumber not a finished product. The rules are similar but different caveats apply. For example that 10kg rule was for finished musical instruments and not lumber. The very minimum is the CITES documentation. Because you want to bring in lumber, you will need to prove the lumber is for personal use. This can be tricky. The reason is that for commercial import of lumber, there are import paperwork that needs to be filled out on the US end. You can find this information from US Customs and the Fish and Wildlife department. If your shipment is deemed commercial you will also need a USDA-APHIS permit. Bear in mind that import of Appendix I articles may also need to be done through designated ports.
 

WahmBoomAh

World Crass Guitarist
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
3,560
I`m in Brazil ALOT over the past 24 years. I have found some great old guitars and a fantastic luthier who knows the score. The only time I ever saw raw BRW was in a couple of shops and it was showed to me with a whispered voice in a tucked away place. ANYTHING requiring documents from the gov't there is a losing propostion.
 




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