In Ear Monitor help/recomendation please

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by Simon, Feb 1, 2015.

  1. Simon

    Simon Supporting Member

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    Hi, I need to get in ear monitors before my hearing gets any worse.
    Those with experience using these, what type do you like, what's the best bang for the buck, etc?

    Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2015
  2. blardie

    blardie Member

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    I use 1964 Ears Triple Drivers and like them. Before those I used Shure E4 phones with custom molded sleeves. I highly recommend custom molded IEMs. Way back before the sleeves I spent most of my time adjusting the things in my ear.

    My whole band went in on the 1964 Ears and they gave us a group discount. If I remember right it was 10% off orders of 5 or more sets.
     
  3. loudboy

    loudboy Member

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    To do it right is a relatively major commitment - all instruments should be miked, and there needs to be a separate mix available for each member.

    Everybody that does it halfway winds up frustrated and usually abandons them.
     
  4. MikeVB

    MikeVB Supporting Member

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    This. And in my experience stereo can make or break your decision to actually use them.
     
  5. slybird

    slybird Member

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    I just use plugs meant to keep water out of my ears. Walgreens and less than $5.

    If you must go to an in ear set up just use your favorite in-ear buds. Use one room mic and a mixer. Add more mics for the amp and drums as you need.

    I don't own it, but from experience with one project I can say the Behringer Powerplay Pro-8 is an excellent product for in-ear monitoring. Your entire band would be able to use it. It allows each user to adjust the mix for their instrument within the mix without changing the entire mix for everyone else.

    As for my favorite ear buds that don't break the bank. Shure SE-215K. Sound quality is really good. If you use the foam the sound deadening is excellent.
     
  6. Simon

    Simon Supporting Member

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    I try regular plugs and have some Etymotics. I don't think they just lower the volume though, my gtr sounds so much different and uncomfortable.
     
  7. slybird

    slybird Member

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    Use what you will. Personally I don't find monitor systems to be worth the hassle or expense. If someone is going to set one up for me I'm happy to use one.

    I have yet to find any ear protection that doesn't change the sound. I just live with it. I use something like these.Tthey attenuate the sound enough to hear my voice whisper during a loud rehearsal. The sound is good enough when with a loud band. I would rather have bad sound than hearing loss.

    As far as comfort, just keep on trying. Eventually you will find something that fits your ears.
     
  8. loudboy

    loudboy Member

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    Wait until you spend $800 on a IEM rig and hear what your guitar sounds like. <g>
     
  9. Simon

    Simon Supporting Member

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    Not sure I understand? can you help me out with some input?
    I assume your saying I wont like that either?
     
  10. slybird

    slybird Member

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    From my experience of using one it sounds just like a live recording if everything is miced up and mixed correctly. Its almost too clear. If the singer is in a booth with a condenser you can hear her/him breath.

    For a gigging band that is moving equipment around it is a bit of hassle to set up before a practice. Time is limited and that would cut into too much practice time.
     
  11. loudboy

    loudboy Member

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    If you're used to feeling a real amp onstage, it will be a completely different experience.

    To get an idea, mic up your amp like you do onstage, record a little and then play it back, in mono, in some phones, or earbuds.

    How does it sound, compared to the amp?
     
  12. Simon

    Simon Supporting Member

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    I guess I always assumed that with most Pro players using them at this point, that it would sound good?
    They must be hearing it in stereo.
     
  13. loudboy

    loudboy Member

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    There's a big difference between the mix that a pro player gets in his IEMs and what you're going to experience, unless of course you're using concert production at every gig.

     
  14. teleman55

    teleman55 Member

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    I'll use 'em if I have to. Those place usually have them. I imagine they've been in a million ears. I hope they clean them. I prefer a wedge. In ears are kinda like when you hear when recording an overdub. Except you can leave one ear in and one out if you want. I like the ambience of wedges. But you are right to protect your ears. Take it from one who didn't always do that. I prefer to skip all that and keep stage volume reasonable. That's fine unless your drummer is too loud. But I don't want a too loud drummer. A too loud drummer probably lacks nuance, in addition to wrecking my ears. Also, don't stand with your head close to cymbals.
     
  15. Simon

    Simon Supporting Member

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    Thanks for sharing, I've heard recently that leaving one side in and one out with plugs or IEM's is bad for you, also I don't want to do damage to my stronger ear.
    Most places I play can get pretty crowded, people get up close, monitors are just to easy for some drunk to trip on, and come falling my way.
     
  16. DrSax

    DrSax Member

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    Yep, for me I'll never bother with them unless I'm hearing something like the Edge is hearing, and that's never going to happen, so...........
     
  17. Simon

    Simon Supporting Member

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    So do you wear any hearing protection, if yes, what?
     
  18. Gasp100

    Gasp100 Silver Supporting Member

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    My band are all using the Shure PSM200 system and my drummer is using a wired Behringer option with buds. The Shure's come with the SE-215's which I think are "decent". My lead singer uses Westone's, not sure what the bassist uses.
    I use an AxeFX II direct.
    Bassist uses some type of Galien Krueger I think direct
    Drums are kick/snare and maybe an overhead

    I much prefer IEM than any other monitoring solution. Personally I think it makes us tighter and DEFINITELY shows in vocals (pitch, harmonies, etc...)
    I'm also not a prima donna when it comes to my guitar tone ;)
     
  19. texasdave

    texasdave Member

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    A bunch of good advice here. If you google up "full frequency ear plugs" you'll find a few other options, and this page has a pretty exhaustive collection for any price point:

    http://www.earplugstore.com/nasopl.html

    You can also order custom molded ear plugs with changeable diaphragms. That's on my list but I haven't done it. I have molds on file at 1964ears so it's just a matter of ordering them... https://www.1964ears.com/product/ClearPlugs

    As others have said, IEM for you is about as much work as IEM for the whole band. The better you get isolated the less you can hear that's not mic'd into your system. When everything's in there and isolation is good, you can pull the volume down. Others have mentioned stereo; that's a good option (probably regardless) but also helpful in a crowded mix. For me, being able to pan some of the band to one side and leave my guitar centered makes it easier to concentrate on what I'm doing without jamming volume higher.

    +1 on the Shure SE-215s. I have a narrow ear canal and those were the best workable solution I could find before I ordered custom molds. Stayed in "better." The customs I typically just use those one place and they were certainly a bit of a vanity purchase, but I never have to worry about one popping out of my ear, and the sound is incredible (I bought the 1964ears V6 Stage.)

    Back to ear plugs, if you look at the link above, you'll see attenuation from 5 to 20db. I have a set of the Earasers (guitar show special price) but I think I'd rather have 10-15db on stage. I usually keep a set of the Hearos triple flange around (like the Eytmotics.) Worst case stick a foamie in my ear on the drummer side. A foamy partially installed offers some protection without killing the highs.

    I certainly see why touring guys go all IEM. Same mix every night, clean stage, etc. But price wireless rigs and custom molds and some sort of dedicated monitor mix and you can spike to $1500 a man without breathing hard. I'll stop rambling now.

    Texasdave
     
  20. bullfrogblues

    bullfrogblues Supporting Member

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