in praise of roger mcguinn

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by jnovac1, Jul 11, 2019.

  1. jnovac1

    jnovac1 Supporting Member

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    proof that pipes aren’t required. what a crazy mix of a natural voice and that rickenbacker. still stunning.
     
  2. mrpinter

    mrpinter Supporting Member

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  3. beatcomber

    beatcomber Member

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    I met him once, about 30 years ago. A very nice man.

    His innovation and influence is highly undervalued.
     
  4. nmiller

    nmiller Drowning in lap steels Gold Supporting Member

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    He could make that natural voice work when required:

     
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  5. PRW

    PRW Member

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    I saw him a few years ago at one of his solo concerts ... out-freaking-standing, and he only played like eight Byrds songs in a 28-song set, but nobody wanted their money back.

    Killer guitar player too, he played his 7-string (doubled G) Martin way more than his Rickenbacker, and he WORE THAT THING OUT! He can do much more than jangle.
     
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  6. sonofspy

    sonofspy Member

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    As a player who, prior to being in the Byrds, had been a session musician, Roger was the ONLY member of the Byrds allowed to play when they recorded the album.
    The rest of the recording was done by the Wrecking Crew.
     
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  7. wrxplayer

    wrxplayer Supporting Member

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    He played the last ever Halloween Ball on the quad in the middle of the University of Florida in 1976, which I was fortunate to attend. Great show, great player, singer, and songwriter.

    And one of the early makers of what we call "jam band" music today, for which he gets too little credit.
     
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  8. wombat66

    wombat66 Member

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    This is not true.
    Roger was a professional musician but not a "Session Man" (Crosby, Hillman, and Gene Clark were also professional folk singers when they started the band). It was only on the "Mr Tambourine Man" single and "I Knew I'd Want You" that the band (except McGuinn) was replaced by the wrecking crew.

    Although the band's musicianship improved following the recording of their debut single, it was assumed by both Columbia and the band's management that their entire debut album would be recorded with session musicians.[18] The band, however, had other ideas and insisted that they be allowed to perform the album's instrumental accompaniment themselves.[18] By the start of recording sessions for the album, Melcher felt satisfied that the group had polished their sound enough to be able to produce professional sounding backing tracks and the Byrds were allowed to record the rest of the Mr. Tambourine Man album without any help from session musicians.[19][20] However, a persistent and widely circulated rumor about the album is that all of the playing on it was done by session musicians.[4] This misconception is likely due to confusion between the "Mr. Tambourine Man" single and the album of the same name. Hillman has stated that the contrast between the more polished sound of the two tracks featuring session musicians ("Mr. Tambourine Man" and "I Knew I'd Want You") and the sound of the rest of the album is quite noticeable.[21]
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mr._Tambourine_Man_(album)

    I hate having to use Wikipedia as my source because its so cliche (its on the internet so its got to be true). But this myth of the session men on the first album was first dispelled in the 60s when I was first a fan and yet somehow continues to this day.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2019
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  9. wombat66

    wombat66 Member

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    I bought the first Byrds album when it was released, one of the first records I ever bought, and have been a fan ever since.
    McGuinn is quite obviously the man.

    A young wombat (circled) Byrd watching on Mt Tamalpais 1967. (Hugh Masekela sat in with the band)
    [​IMG]
     
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  10. beatcomber

    beatcomber Member

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    Whoa...!!!!
     
  11. PRW

    PRW Member

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    This is what Roger is doing these days on Eight Miles High ...

     
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  12. sonofspy

    sonofspy Member

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    Right you are. In this case my memory was faulty...
    "While having reluctantly agreed in
    the interim to allow the other four
    members to now also play their own
    instruments (through heavy pressure
    from the band’s management), Melcher
    still found the occasional need to bring
    in Hal Blaine to “sweeten” some of the
    percussion. Having a rock-solid rhythm
    track was vital for any song—it was the
    foundation upon which everything else
    was built. But the unrelenting Michael
    Clarke saw Blaine’s presence in a
    different light.
    “We don’t need another drummer in
    here,” a still-resentful Clarke said to
    Melcher one afternoon as they and the
    rest of the band listened in the booth to a
    song on which Blaine had contributed.
    “It should just be the five of us. I can
    handle all the playing. I’ve been doing it
    onstage every night at Ciro’s, you
    know.”
    Here we go again, thought the
    producer.
    “We’ve already been through this,
    Michael,” Melcher said evenly, trying
    his best to remain patient. “Playing live
    is very different from what is needed in
    the studio. In some ways, I just don’t
    think you’re quite there yet.”
    “********,” Clarke replied.
    That finally tore it. Clarke never did
    know when to quit. And Melcher had
    taken all he could of the rookie
    drummer’s constant complaining.
    “Listen,” said Melcher, his voice
    rising as he spun around in his chair.
    “You need to sit down and shut the ****
    up right now. Or leave this studio. Your
    choice. Got it?”
    The Wrecking Crew
     
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  13. tenchijin2

    tenchijin2 Supporting Member

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    I liked his 12 string playing on the Beach Boys' version of California Dreamin'. I like this version considerably more than the original, in fact.
     
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  14. GrungeMan

    GrungeMan Supporting Member

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    My favorite era of The Byrds. They definitely were a tight oufit in the 70's with more guitar. In this era I always thought Clarence White was the bonafide gunslinger in the band with McGuinn doing his chimey thing with the Ric...
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2019
  15. zzmoore

    zzmoore Member

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    :aok:aok
    I am not saying he was my "Favorite Of All Time".....but i appreciate his talent; so much so that i wanted to give a "Like" to this whole thread but i stopped after #3. :):)
     
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  16. jnovac1

    jnovac1 Supporting Member

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    a fine album!
     
  17. twotone

    twotone Member

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    I remember a video clip of him showing how he played Turn! Turn! Turn! on the guitar. He used banjo fingerpicks to pluck the strings. I always wondered how he played that song.
     
  18. Rockledge

    Rockledge Member

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    I wasn't a fan of the Byrds and haven't heard a lot of his solo stuff, but I have a copy of Back From Rio and it kicks ass.
     
  19. GrungeMan

    GrungeMan Supporting Member

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    I like his solo stuff, check out Cardiff Rose...
     
  20. Northerner

    Northerner Member

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    He taught Michael Bloomfield how to bend a note.
    Then, there was The Byrds.
     

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