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In Praise of (solid) Drummers

Tony

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
6,017
Played three sets this weekend with my favorite local drummer... no frills, no overplaying, no huge tempo swings - just solid, smooth and rockin'.

It's so much more fun making music with a solid drummer. Wish we could clone him.


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loudboy

Member
Messages
27,312
Crappy drummer = crappy band.

I've been lucky enough to play with some really good drummers and I'm totally spoiled, it's just so much easier to play w/someone good.
 

Tom CT

Old Supporting Member
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
17,898
98% of drummers are hacks when it comes to learning and playing to the song & making way for the vocals and others.
I'm pretty sure that's what drummers say about guitarists, and rightly so.
 

Tom CT

Old Supporting Member
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
17,898
Ah, only 98%. Gotcha.

The drummer bashing on TGP is predictable and trite. I can't count how many guitarists I've heard who have trouble with time, tuning, volume, tone, overplaying, etc. It's a two-way street and endless complaining about drummers doesn't put guitarists in a better light.
 

Tony

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
6,017
Thread title = In Praise of Solid Drummers, not Let's Bash 98% of Drummers.


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eclecto-acoustic

Serial tree-hugger
Messages
10,944
Played three sets this weekend with my favorite local drummer... no frills, no overplaying, no huge tempo swings - just solid, smooth and rockin'.

It's so much more fun making music with a solid drummer. Wish we could clone him.
Yes.
 

Flogger59

Member
Messages
11,867
Most of the guys I play with are really good, I'm lucky. Nothing worse that having to drag the tempo up by the scruff of the neck when the drummer flags.
 

BMX

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,740
I've rarely seen a band with a really good guitarist and a bad drummer. Good drummers play with good guitarists or for money (hopefully both) If you can't find a good drummer pay more money. Guitarists who want to jam a lot, soloing endlessly over a simple progression and want to find a drummer who doesn't speed up during drum fills or overplay are in la la land.
 

oldtelefart

Member
Messages
4,664
Currently working with a drummer who makes me smile and look forward to playing.
Solid, near-perfect time, only plays a fill if the song needs it, and he's a sane and pleasant individual.
Also, his kit sounds great, he's organized and punctual, never gets out of it.

(This sounds like a long set-up to a joke punchline, but it's all true.)
 

James Knox

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
738
Agreed! All praise for good drummers.

I played a lot for a Musical Director that used to say, "as the drummer goes, so goes the band". We rotated about 5 drummers through - what a joy it was to play with the good ones...
 

83stratman

Senior Member
Messages
6,217
I disagree. I've played with a drummer that uses electronic drums. Electronic drums suck the life out of the music.

A drummer who can actually play music is a thing of beauty.

98% of drummers are hacks when it comes to learning and playing to the song & making way for the vocals and others.

Our drummer now has a Roland TD30K kit and it's the best thing that could happen to any band this century. The white noise of the cymbals has been removed from ear and vocal mic level. No more fatiguing rehearsals or gigs + I can actually now turn down my guitar amp. IMHO this will be the "required" future for drummers when playing with others or at venues. Again IMHO they've brought this upon themselves.

If you have a drummer who plays for the band/song and not in the Olympics 100metre sprint or smashing rocks (AKA: cymbals) in a quarry you're one lucky band.
 

loudboy

Member
Messages
27,312
If a drummer is using the new Roland TD30K kit and knows how to set it using 2 x FRFR monitors on either side of him + a sub for the kick I totally disagree. The imaging makes a world of difference + the sounds in the TD30 are as real as it gets.

Once you've played with this state of the art set up you'll have a different point of view. They're that good, I assure you.
Carrying around twice as much gear, to approximate the sound of real drums...

Great idea.
 

27sauce

Senior Member
Messages
37,200
Sigh…I went 15 years playing with 2 different solid drummers. Oh well, I'll always have my memories!
 

eBayfreak

Member
Messages
60
This thread interests me as I'm a guitar player that now has a more or less permanent gig playing drums at church, as all of the other drummers left, but guitar players are a dime a dozen of course.

I'm trying not to be like some of the lousy drummers that I've had to play with before, so I'm keeping it way simple. The thing I'm finding hard is "faking it". When I was short on rehearsal time with guitar, I was confident enough to make it work anyway, and just ease off if parts of the song were unclear. With drums, you can't really do that, and I keep getting stuck with all-new unfamiliar songs, with only 1 hour of possible rehearsal time. Does anyone have any tips for making it through a song on drums when you (and the band) don't really know all of the breaks and changes?
 

Tone_Terrific

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
35,016
Drums are not the most important instrument in a band.
You have to have a good singer and some sort of accompanying instrument or nobody will ever hire your band.
With the rare exception of the drum corps.:)
That said truly bad timing will wreck a song.
Wandering timing is tolerable, a little bit.
Drummers not knowing the song drag down the performance even if they can keep time, but that is not likely to lead to a trainwreck, if they don't try to make up something that is unsuitable. 83% of the time the band can muddle through.;)
Everybody wants a drummer who recognizes standard rhythms, learns the song, doesn't rush fills or choruses, has a good sounding kit, and hits each stroke as though they mean it.
Edrums where I can hear the sticks bouncing on rubber instead of cymbals are super annoying with the cymbal (or whatever) sound coming from 'over there.'
I don't like playing with the 'play along' type.
Just play the song right.:bow
 

loudboy

Member
Messages
27,312
In fact less as each drum/cymbal can have 2 sounds on it PLUS you get the sound totally under control & away from the most important part of a band - the vocalist's ears & mics. (the other benefit is the guitars can come way down in volume not competing with cymbals)

In this day and age guitarists can sometimes carry more than a drummer equipment wise. Our drummer has 2 cases all told (on wheels) for his drums/stands plus 3 speaker units. BTW: With the three speakers no need for "huge" drum fills any longer.

Now THAT'S a great idea!
Possibly for lounge band and church players, where low volume trumps sound quality and feel. I don't do either of those gigs, so I like real drums...

I did sound for several years for a band who's (rich) drummer thought the eDrums were the way to go.

He wound up buying a giant PA, to play small clubs, so his drums sounded good. They were still using real amps, so the stage volume wasn't significantly lower than with real drums, it was just 2-3x the amount of gear that would've been needed, if he just used his acoustic kit.

In the end, whatever gets you the gig. <g>
 

Tony

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
6,017
This thread interests me as I'm a guitar player that now has a more or less permanent gig playing drums at church, as all of the other drummers left, but guitar players are a dime a dozen of course.

I'm trying not to be like some of the lousy drummers that I've had to play with before, so I'm keeping it way simple. The thing I'm finding hard is "faking it". When I was short on rehearsal time with guitar, I was confident enough to make it work anyway, and just ease off if parts of the song were unclear. With drums, you can't really do that, and I keep getting stuck with all-new unfamiliar songs, with only 1 hour of possible rehearsal time. Does anyone have any tips for making it through a song on drums when you (and the band) don't really know all of the breaks and changes?

I sit on on drums at church periodically as well and am in the same boat. Not much practice time and I lack the skills to fake my way thru it.

All I can do is make sure I know the arrangements. Usually I'll listen to the tunes all week (in the car, at my desk) and that does the trick.


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