Inconsistent Jazz III picks

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by MikeMcK, Dec 26, 2009.

  1. MikeMcK

    MikeMcK Member

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    I know this is a "gear accessories" question, but I think it borders on a technique question so I hope this isn't too out of line in this forum.

    I'm trying to break my addiction to Dunlop 3.0 mm Stubbies... what I thought was a technique/tone problem turned out to be the chirpiness of the hard Lexan picks.

    I switched to Jazz IIIs and suddenly realize that I can split my Jazz IIIs into two distinct piles; some are clear-sounding and very controllable (both feel and sound), while others feel less "sure" and sound a little fizzy (sorry, the best I can describe it).

    I thought it was in my head, so I marked the "fizzy" ones with a marker, threw them in a pile, tried each without looking, and threw them in separate piles again... got every one, 4 fizzy ones and 5 good ones.

    Did Dunlop change the materials or something? If so, the "good ones" are hopefully what I'd get today (I've bought these over the course of many years). Or am I just making myself crazy?
     
  2. guitwitit

    guitwitit Member

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    I definitely don't think you are making yourself crazy. I have an ashtray full of different picks and, to me, they all sound different. To other people, not so much.

    Also, it's very plausible that Dunlop's quality control in the area of pick making could be non existent. I mean, what would the standards be?

    The Eric Johnson Jazz III was modeled after a jazz III from the 70's that EJ loved to death. He said Dunlop didn't make them the same today.

    So, basically, it's not much of a stretch for me to believe you.
     
  3. Swain

    Swain Member

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    I remember either EJ or oe Bonamassa saying they preferred (I think) Red over Black, as the different colors had a different Tone. I guess the Dye would make a difference?

    Anyway, maybe any differences could be minimized by playing with a different angle, or at a different point along the String's length?

    Other options:
    Clayton Picks
    Mock Tortoise Shell (Golden Gate, I believe)
    Those Picks made from Horns or Hoofs (sp: Hooves?)
     
  4. lifeinsong

    lifeinsong Member

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    Forget the Jazz III's and try the V-Picks Small Pointed, you'll thank me later.
     
  5. MikeMcK

    MikeMcK Member

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    Thanks for the replies and the support.

    lifeinsong, I did try V-Picks; love them for some things, but for overdriven guitar I still get the same high-frequency chirp on the attack as I did with the Stubbies. Thanks, though.
     
  6. dewey decibel

    dewey decibel Supporting Member

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    No you're not crazy. Besides the current black ones sounding different than the red ones, older red ones sound different than newer. I have some older ones and they feel smoother to the touch, and you can hear it in the attack and timbre. The newer reds are rougher feeling and not as solid. They almost feel porous in comparison. In fact I'm pretty sure there's been threads on this before (maybe it was a different forum though).
     
  7. russ6100

    russ6100 Member

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    Not crazy - matter of fact, I have recently been in contact with Jim Dunlop customer service about some inconsistencies in their JD 270 jazz picks. Out of 10 or so picks, over half of them have this "flash" around the edge that makes them sound terrible. Maybe a similar thing going on with the jazz IIIs.....

    They told me to take a photo of the problem and send it to them.
     
  8. Rob 62

    Rob 62 Member

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    I've got piles of white Fender teardrops - all "Heavy". Some of these are almost translucent, and others are opaque white. They subsequently sound different, and I prefer the denser white ones.

    Side note: the Clayton teardrops, while slightly smaller, are another great pick, with a brighter sound than the Fenders, and a powdery sort of matte finish that has the effect of rosin on a bow - you can feel it pull on the string, which creates a very articulate-feeling pick. Try them!
     
  9. marsos52

    marsos52 Member

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    i use the small pointed v-picks and the "chirp" goes away after the pick is used a bit and broke in to your picking
     
  10. MikeMcK

    MikeMcK Member

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    That's it! I had to get out a magnifying glass, but the bad-sounding ones have extremely thin remnants of a molding seam... ran a knife edge around a couple of them and they're much better.
     
  11. scolfax

    scolfax Member

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    If you like the Jazz III but are thinking about moving to a larger pick, you might like the Dunlop Ultex Sharp.
     
  12. russ6100

    russ6100 Member

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    Hey - that's great! Glad that worked for you...

    That's what I usually have done to fix that kind of thing on picks before but with these JD 207s - they're rock hard. I suppose I could sand them, then use progressively finer grits to get it polished.....
     
  13. dewey decibel

    dewey decibel Supporting Member

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    When I used the Jazz IIIs I used to sand the edges. I think 120 grit or so, I never got crazy with it. Just kept some paper in my guitar case. Also helps to keep a pointy (sharp) tip.
     

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