Indian rosewood and super glue (crazy glue) and violent reaction

Discussion in 'The Small Company Luthiers' started by Will-, Jan 31, 2012.

  1. Will-

    Will- Member

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    So i was putting a nice new 12' radius on the fingerboard of a 1960's Hofner Congress today.

    I had nicely removed the frets and only ended up with two chips in a fret slot , so to fill them in i past the radius block across the finger board a couple of times to create some dust so i could mix it with some super glue and make a paste to fill these chips, i collected the dust on the back of a spent piece of sand paper and proceeded to add some super glue.

    Upon adding the glue to the rosewood dust the glue began to bubble and smoke and spit everywhere (it burnt a small hole in my hand) then set instantly.

    Now I've mixed super glue with rosewood on many occasions to fill voids and cracks etc but I've never had this happen before.

    Has anyone out there ever experienced this ?

    Cheers

    Will
     
  2. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Member

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    Happened many time to me. It seems to react with any rosewood dust, not just IRW. Cocobolo - same reaction. If I have to fill, I leave out the dust and just use the CA.


    Cheers,
     
  3. Will-

    Will- Member

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    Thanks Jack : )
     
  4. Paul Rhoney

    Paul Rhoney Member

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    That's happened to me too. When I fill I make sure the gap/chip/whatever is filled with dust and leave a little dust mound proud of the surface, then add the super glue on top. Mixing it off the intended area that needs filling would, as you experienced, set up too quickly. And yes, it sometimes smokes and spits nd the fumes are nasty, so just don't get too close.
     
  5. Will-

    Will- Member

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    Thanks for the advice guys , anyone know why this actually happens ?
     
  6. Laurent Brondel

    Laurent Brondel Supporting Member

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    CA cures instantly in contact with moisture, and generates a lot of heat in doing so.
    There is moisture in wood, always, perhaps more in an old fretboard that has been repeatedly oiled?
    The best way to do this IME is to use small pipettes to apply the CA. A bit of CA first in the crack or void, then a bit of dust, repeat until it can be levelled.
    BTW CA fumes are not toxic per se, but are a strong irritant. I have become highly sensitive to CA with repeated exposure, even allergic. Work in a well ventilated area¬Ö
     
  7. Husky

    Husky Gold Supporting Member

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    Use a slower drying glue like Slo-Zap
    [​IMG]
     
  8. Sweetfinger

    Sweetfinger Supporting Member

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    CA reacts with cellulose. Notice how it really sizzles and smokes on a paper towel? Wood is just cellulose but with less surface area. Also- the reaction uses water. The more humid the air/surface is the quicker the reaction. FRESH CA glue is also a little more 'peppy' and the thinner the glue, the faster the reaction.
     
  9. Will-

    Will- Member

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    Well I've now levelled the fingerboard, filled in the voids and I'm now installing frets, thanks for all the info guys .

    Will
     
  10. Schroeder

    Schroeder Member

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    Ooooh ya!! Fun with rosewood and CA glue, next on Myth Busters! What I do now is fill the chip/hole with dry sawdust, then put a drop of CA on the pile until the sawdust is wet. I then put dry sawdust on top of the wet sawdust and leave it to dry. I then level. If it is a deep chip, I will do this in layers until it is flush. I have never had a violent exothermic reaction when doing it this way. I like having a bit of solid (sawdust) in there for color and because CA will shrink back a bit when it dries. I think this helps a bit. Just my way, YMMV.
     
  11. 250Keith

    250Keith Member

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    I hate to ask this but! what is CA?
     
  12. Schroeder

    Schroeder Member

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    Cyanoacrylate or "CA" glue. Easier to say! It is Superglue.
     
  13. 250Keith

    250Keith Member

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    Thank you. and by the way Redding is one of my old stomping grounds!! love it there.
     
  14. simplecomplexity

    simplecomplexity Senior Member

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    i'm no luthier.. but its good info! thanks
     
  15. adamg

    adamg Member

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    I use CA on wood all the time but interesting info on rosewood. I usually use a bit of Titebond with wood dust to make wood bondo... it looks bad wet but cures to the right color in my experience.
     
  16. mullytron

    mullytron Supporting Member

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    Could also relate to the grit you were using and size of the dust particles, since smaller dust = more surface area = faster reaction = more heat. WHEE.
     
  17. Lashing

    Lashing Member

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    Looks like everythings been covered so all I can say is +1. Happens everytime
     

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