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input

oakmon

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
152
i have a 66 super reverb and it seems like input # 2 on each channel has a smoother sound to it than input # 1. any thoughts on that ? Im new to this site and are very impressed with the knowledge and friendy help I get here. fun stuff. we all love this vintage gear for sure. thanks,tom
 
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Benny

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
1,345
That's a feature, not a bug. Assuming your super is stock, the arrangement of the input resistors connected to the input jacks are such that plugging in to the #2 jack attenuates the incoming guitar signal when compared to plugging into the #1 jack. Passing a smaller input signal to the first gain stage in this manner (and the resulting processing of this attenuated/rolled off input as it passes through the amp) accounts for the smoother sound.

This can be particularly cool/helpful if you've got a guitar with powerful and/or very bright pickups, and you don't want to hit the front end of the amp as hard.
 
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oakmon

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
152
That's a feature, not a bug. Assuming your super is stock, the arrangement of the input resistors connected to the input jacks are such that plugging in to the #2 jack attenuates the incoming guitar signal when compared to plugging into the #1 jack. Passing a smaller input signal to the first gain stage in this manner (and the resulting processing of this attenuated/rolled off input as it passes through the amp) accounts for the smoother sound.

This can be particularly cool/helpful if you've got a guitar with powerful and/or very bright pickups, and you don't want to hit the front end of the amp as hard.
thanks benny for the info. I have a custom made strat with fralin vintage hots with a 10% overwound bridge pickup.input #2 just sounds smoother which I like.my super is stock with the original reconed cts ceramic speakers.gordonspeakerman reconed my speakers.he is the best out there IMO.anyway, great info on this gear page.im a new member and have enjoyed reading this for a while.a lot of folks out there that know a lot more than I do.i love the old vintage stuff like most on here.wish I had some of it back.BTW,any opinion about the smoothest sounding preamp tube in V2? thanks,tom
 

Benny

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
1,345
There are others here with a much broader and deeper knowledge of the characteristics of the currently available NOS and/or current production preamp tubes, so hopefully they'll chime in. My sample size is pretty small, as I've tended to try a couple of nice old tubes in the various positions, find a combination I like, and leave it be until it fails (which they rarely do). I have a GE 7025 in V2 in one of my supers, and an old RCA 12ax7 in V2 of the other, and both of them have low noise, a full, relatively even response, sound good, and just work nicely for my purposes. Everyone's got a different definition of smooth, but it's my understanding that the RFT 12ax7's can come across as a little darker, which might translate to a smoother overdrive or near-overdrive characteristic in a super.

Not to fully derail, but if you're looking to really smooth out a Super Reverb, it might be worth reading up on/checking out an Ayan Smooth 'n' Slim - it's a passive (no batteries) box that plug into the front end of your amp that does some filtering to the incoming guitar signal. Not sure if they're still made or not. I had one for a while, and it's a cool sound/idea.
 
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ripgtr

Member
Messages
10,559
i have a 66 super reverb and it seems like input # 2 on each channel has a smoother sound to it than input # 1. any thoughts on that ? thanks
What @Benny said, plus, input #2 has a much lower impedance. This will affect the tone as well. So, you are putting a lot less into the first tube stage.
From my reading, The second input on Fenders was originally designed as an accordion input, which apparently have higher output than a guitar.
Depends on what you like, if it works better for you, that is a plus.
 

oakmon

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
152
There are others here with a much broader and deeper knowledge of the characteristics of the currently available NOS and/or current production preamp tubes, so hopefully they'll chime in. My sample size is pretty small, as I've tended to try a couple of nice old tubes in the various positions, find a combination I like, and leave it be until it fails (which they rarely do). I have a GE 7025 in V2 in one of my supers, and an old RCA 12ax7 in V2 of the other, and both of them have low noise, a full, relatively even response, sound good, and just work nicely for my purposes. Everyone's got a different definition of smooth, but it's my understanding that the RFT 12ax7's can come across as a little darker, which might translate to a smoother overdrive or near-overdrive characteristic in a super.

Not to fully derail, but if you're looking to really smooth out a Super Reverb, it might be worth reading up on/checking out an Ayan Smooth 'n' Slim - it's a passive (no batteries) box that plug into the front end of your amp that does some filtering to the incoming guitar signal. Not sure if they're still made or not. I had one for a while, and it's a cool sound/idea.
great info benny. I guess it's just a matter of trial and error.many thanks
 

Silent Sound

Member
Messages
5,594
Here's a link that describes what's happening in more detail: http://torresengineering.stores.yahoo.net/latvinguitar.html

Basically, it's similar to just turning down the volume a bit on your guitar. By using the second input, you're increasing the resistance from the pickups to the first gain stage, and decreasing the resistance from the pickups to ground. Much like how a volume pot works. Though volume pots are variable, and the two resistance measurements are proportional to each other. The input jacks are static, and set to a different proportion that you can achieve with the volume pot (most likely). But either way, you're altering the input gain and impedance, which is what causes the lower volume and darker sound.
 

oakmon

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
152
Here's a link that describes what's happening in more detail: http://torresengineering.stores.yahoo.net/latvinguitar.html

Basically, it's similar to just turning down the volume a bit on your guitar. By using the second input, you're increasing the resistance from the pickups to the first gain stage, and decreasing the resistance from the pickups to ground. Much like how a volume pot works. Though volume pots are variable, and the two resistance measurements are proportional to each other. The input jacks are static, and set to a different proportion that you can achieve with the volume pot (most likely). But either way, you're altering the input gain and impedance, which is what causes the lower volume and darker sound.
thanks silent sound.great info
 






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