Installing patio with pavers and some foundation work

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by TheGuildedAge, Apr 19, 2015.

  1. TheGuildedAge

    TheGuildedAge Member

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    The back patio under our deck is concrete and really cracked. We had an issue with water coming in the basement, but I patched the concrete along the foundation and that did the trick. This year though, the patch is cracked. I am planning to repatch today just as a temporary solution again.

    It would not be difficult to jackhammer out the patio and install pavers, which my wife wants.

    My concern though is with a history of water coming in during heavy rain, would I be better off having a pro do it so they can do it correctly.

    My question is have any of you have a patio put in and if so, what's a ball park range to expect to pay if I do the demo work?

    Wide range is fine: Under $2000, $5-10K, etc. Just curious.
     
  2. mango

    mango Member

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    I can't address pricing in your area but it sounds like the main issue with the water is that there is not enough grade to take the water away from your foundation .
    Address that issue and you could do it yourself,but there is a lot of labour involved.
     
  3. DICKIE C

    DICKIE C Member

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    Difficult to answer your questions w/out more specific info.

    However;
    A standard sized patio, let's say 12'x12', laid out with concrete pavers (usually the cheapest), COULD be done for @ $3K. This assumes minimal grading at the onset. Natural stone would be more expensive and if there is much re-grading needed, price could easily stretch past $5k. Again, it depends on many potential factors, which I would need to see before giving you any kind of honest price.

    Do not assume that your potential patio contractor will be automatically aware of water issues as patios aren't always done with water deflection from the foundation in mind. Make sure you discuss it with them.
     
  4. ACfixer

    ACfixer Member

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    Let's see two pics, one of the crack and another of the overall project.
     
  5. TheGuildedAge

    TheGuildedAge Member

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    I can't do a pic for a bit, I'm babysitting, but if it helps it's a 12x20 area under our deck.

    You could probably make it 12x12 and eliminate concrete under the stairs and just put grass there.

    The concrete is severely damaged. Right now there are 5 12x4 rectangular blocks, at least, there used to be. An 8x8 section is ground down to the rubble and stone.

    After that, there are two huge cracks where the blocks are uneven by a half an inch plus. Every block has cracks, etc. It cracked when we bought the house, but it's definitely worse now. More cosmetic than anything, except for the water leak risk.

    There was a pretty big sized hole by the door and the concrete separated from the house where the foundation meets the patio, so I used some patch and filler today from Quickrete just to seal it all back up. In hindsight, I wonder if I should have used the water stopping concrete.

    I used the patch stuff last year and knock it wood it held, so for now it doesn't look pretty but I got it all sealed up for the rain this year.
     
  6. THebert

    THebert Member

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    Having my whole house remodeled right now. First class all the way, too! I've got about 20ft of steps and a med sized front porch and they quoted me $4940 for pavers. But the initial quote was 6K and my guy said he thought the price was high so he looked around and got it lower. That's material and labor and we selected a paver from the pages our contractor said were the lesser expensive ones. Hope that helps.
     
  7. Ladhilbluesband

    Ladhilbluesband Member

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    Really hard to guess what has to be done under the patio first. Where's the water coming from? Is the patio covered or not? Are you down spouts working properly? The main thing is to ensure down spouts work and that the foundation under the patio is correct.

    I did a 300 square foot patio and it cost me $1,200. I did the labor myself. 3/4" minus rock (8 inches deep) then about 4 inches of sand to float, laid pavers and done deal.
     
  8. scottlr

    scottlr Member

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    I am no contractor, but you HAVE to have the grade going away from the house to avoid this issue.

    Is it a walk out basement, or not? Either way, the grade needs to drain water away from the house.
     
  9. TheGuildedAge

    TheGuildedAge Member

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    Yes, the finished basement walks out to the patio. It was like this when we bought the house.

    During a heavy downpour last year, a tiny bit of water seeped in.

    I used concrete repair stuff to fill in some of the gaps and it was ok last spring and summer.

    The patio must have taken a beating this winter, because it is noticeably worse now. I chiseled away the cracked concrete today and cleaned it all out and put down new repair stuff.

    It's supposed to rain this week, so I will find out.
     
  10. swlees

    swlees Member

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    We had a 10'x20' paver patio built on our old house. It cost around $4,500, if I remember correctly. The contractor spent far more time preparing the surface (tamping, stone, leveling, etc.) than on the actual installation of the pavers. I believe the prep work is the most important part of the project, judging from the time spent on it.

    We ended up actually having water problems. The pavers right at this side of the house settled, forming a shallow depression. Water would pool there and seep into the mud room. Not good. Make sure you get the grading and site prep right.
     
  11. paulbearer

    paulbearer Supporting Member

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    might want to run a curtain drain around the perimeter to help preclude the runoff...
    an example from the web:
    [​IMG]
     
  12. specialidiot

    specialidiot most likely to seceede Supporting Member

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    As others have said, I guarantee you it is a drainage problem not a concrete problem. You have to get the water away from the house, either by adjusting the grade or installing drain tile. Then decide what to do about the patio.
     
  13. 335guy

    335guy Member

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    One thing about installing pavers is to ensure the soil underneath is properly compacted. That could require excavating down a bit and compacting the soil with a tamper compactor. That's if you don't want the paved deck to heave from earth movement. And if you get soil freeze, typically, compact down to below 4 ft, unless there is solid rock under this area. You may want to enlist a soils engineer to determine which type of soil you have.

    Of course, proper drainage/slope is needed as well, along with the right amount of crushed rock and sand. The paver supplier should be able to give you the proper specs to install the pavers.

    If you're getting water inside the home during rain downpours, then you need to think about improving the drainage in that area. That can be done different ways, but having proper slope to the patio area, along with a well draining gravel and sand paver base should help a lot. A french drain could be employed under the paver area near the house to divert water away faster, if needed. And of course, examine the gutters and downspouts to ensure proper operation. They should be diverting water well away from the home. And inspect the door/s perimeter to ensure water isn't getting in around or under the door/s. Re-caulking and new weatherstrip maybe needed.
     
  14. Tahitijack

    Tahitijack Member

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    I would hire a pro to do the design/work. Remember you are protecting your home and largest investment. When the hardscape guy installed my paver patio and side of the house walkways he first installed underground drainage pipes that carry away rainwater to the curb. There are several collector points over the entire system. Although we have not had rain for a couple of years it worked perfectly a couple of years ago when we got several storms. Good luck.
     

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