Installing Weber Beam Blockers

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs' started by DejavuDave, Oct 11, 2006.

  1. DejavuDave

    DejavuDave Member

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    I need advice from anybody who has installed and used the Weber Beam Blockers.

    The speakers in my 2x12 cab are rear-mounted. The speaker rims are pressed firmly against the baffle they are mounted to. If I install the beam blockers in the prescribed way, I believe I will need to place them between the speaker rim and the baffle. That means after installation the speaker rim would no longer be pressed against the baffle and there will be a gap all the way around except where the rim comes in contact with the beam blocker. Even if I were to place washers or shims of some sort at the remaining mounting points the speaker would still be separated from the board --- there would no longer be a complete seal between speaker rim and baffle. I would think these gaps might be detrimental to the integrity of the speaker rim or might adversely affect the tone of the speaker (blocked beam not withstanding).

    What is your experience?
     
  2. DejavuDave

    DejavuDave Member

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  3. DArmstrong

    DArmstrong Member

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    I installed one under the speaker and used washers under the other mounting bolts to match the thickness of the beam blocker. But later on I mounted the beam blocker on the other side of the baffle. I didn't have to remove the grill cloth, I just dabbed a little epoxy on the ends of the beam blocker and glued it on.

    I suppose if I remove it I'll damage the baffle a bit, but it's not a vintage amp and I don't care; it's invisible anyway. BTW I held the thing in place with clothespins while the epoxy hardened.

    It's been fine like this for a year now.
     
  4. Hamer95USA

    Hamer95USA Member

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    Hey DejavuDave,

    I saw your posting and will share my experience with you installing the Weber Beam Blockers. I installed the 5" Beam Blocker on my Mesa Boogie Simul-Satellite combo and the 4" Beam Blocker on my Marshall 6101 combo. Both amps have the EV12L which is a heavy speaker. My Marshall 6101 combo's speaker is rear loaded which involved removing the rear baffle and the amp chassis to get to the speaker. I removed both, uninstalled the speaker, installed the Beam Blocker and installed the speaker screws into the baffle. The Beam Blocker is fairly thin and you won't have to worry about a gap between the speaker and the baffle. Placing shims and washers would only increase the gap between the baffle, Beam Blocker and the speaker rim.

    Guitar George
     
  5. coreybox

    coreybox Member

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    That depends on what he means. The way i read it, the rim is touching the baffle. He could have meant the gasket. If he means gasket then yes, it will provide some cushion and have a seal still. It the gasket is compressed all the way and the rim is touching the baffle, then he will have problems.
     
  6. KenTone3

    KenTone3 Member

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    According to Ted Weber, the gasket on the speaker will conform (give in)
    to the beam blocker and therefore still allow a tight seal.
     
  7. DejavuDave

    DejavuDave Member

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    Thank you for the reponses.

    I'm getting a clearer picture now on what must happen for this work properly and not damage the speaker. Every speaker is different and I will have to pay close atttention to the amount of gasket available on mine. I'm tempted indeed to cut the ends of my blockers in the fashion described in the post coreybox refered. Everyone should read the post he refers to. VERY interesting.

    Please keep the insights coming if you have any. Thanks again!
     
  8. frankencat

    frankencat Guitarded Gold Supporting Member

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    I asked Ted Weber about this a while back and that's what he told me. I never did try them though.
     
  9. pm81

    pm81 Member

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    That has been my experience with installing one. I didn't really think too much about it initially, I just put it on based on Ted's graphic.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. BudLite

    BudLite Supporting Member

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    What I did was to mark w/ a pencil the beam blocker on the speaker gasket. Then use a exacto type razor knife and notch out a little bit of the gasket. Then install beam blocker and the speaker will sit firmly all the way around....No gap...
     
  11. Dave Orban

    Dave Orban Gold Supporting Member

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    That's what I did.

    Of course, my amp is an open back combo cab, so having a "seal" around the perimeter of the speaker doesn't mean much to me.

    That said, I doubt if having a "seal" around the perimiter in a closed-back cab would make a truly significant difference in tone....
     
  12. Free

    Free Member

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    Please confirm guys - are you sure you don't lose any tone, volume, or articulation with the beam blockers? Is tone really just better dispersed? Thanks.
     
  13. Dave Orban

    Dave Orban Gold Supporting Member

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    I was listening intently at last night's gig.

    From where I stand -- above and about 5 feet in front of the amp -- I can hear my sound probably better than before.

    Out in front, the sound loses some of the spikiness directly in front of the amp, sparing those people sitting in tables directly in front of me.

    All in all, I think it's worked out very well, and am happy I took the time to install it.
     
  14. ChickenLover

    ChickenLover Member

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    I had them on several of my cabs and have removed them from all. Every time I used them I had problems with the sorround hitting the beam blocker...or something. I just know that in every case I got some nasty noises when cranked. So I have a pile of perfect beam blockers...anbody want some beam blockers?
     
  15. monstermike

    monstermike Member

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    You lose a little bit of volume (hardly any) and a little bit of treble (again, hardly any). It makes sense, given that the whole point of the concept is to reduce harshness and ear fatigue. The dispersion factor does seem to be there, but I have to wonder how much the felt or foam-covered dome is actually reflecting.
     
  16. Free

    Free Member

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    I thought that would be the case - thanks much for taking the time to confirm.
     
  17. 908SSP

    908SSP Supporting Member

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    I have installed over two dozen home made ones and in every case the sound was better then before. More even from different listening positions and better integrated, just a very pleasing improvement. Never had an install that resulted in any distorsion or noise.
     
  18. Mark Robinson

    Mark Robinson Member

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    No buyers remorse at all. They are installed exactly as the Weber drawing shows. Any leakage is insignificant, and the sound is preferable generally.

    Years ago, I built a bunch of cabinets, 2 x 12's and 1 x 15's and helped a friend "finish" and cover a 4 x 12". You know, no cash, save a buck,(we could swing a sheet or two of particle board, or steal plywood), kids trying to make noise.

    From what I learned then, totally sealing a closed back is a poor strategy and in my case, made for lumpy frequency response, some notes absent, some notes popping out louder than average. After looking at a bunch of good sounding professionally constructed closed back cabs of identical dimensions, we learned that the interior needs to be relieved with leakage, a slot or an intelligently designed port, to sound smooth and even. Dacron or fiberglass is good, but can be overdone, and make a cabinet pretty drab.

    So long story short, having a water or airtight baffle seal, is probably O.K. but no real advantage to a reasonably tight fit. Some speaker baffles are designed to resonate and flex, and it actually adds resonance and dimensionality to the sound.

    Overtightening the perimeter screws should be avoided. if the basket is a stamped type, and is distorted by the tightening, a rub can develop.
     

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