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Instruction books/dvds

Dimitri

Member
Messages
247
I've searched everywhere and I ended up buying "Mastering The Fretboard" by Troy Stetina.

While I'm sure this a a great book, I can't seem to bond with it or keep my focus. Also the hearing training, which is usefull, is not something I want to get into right now.


What I need:

Pentatonic / major / minor / blues scales explained

I've learned my pentatonic scale in the 5 different positions, but I have no idea what to do with them now. How to connect them en create something melodic.

So How to play the scales, different positions, and how to combine them

Solo techniques... also usefull practice methods I can do at home

An explanation of how to solo over the rhythm chords... switching between keys/scales

I've been playing for over 10 years and everything is still like rocket science to me.

I can't read music sheets, only tab notation.

So are there any books or dvds someone could recommend me, helping me to figure out the guitar and its playing bit by bit?

Taking lessons would be ideal ofcourse, but there is no room in my budget to afford a teachee.
 

snouter

Senior Member
Messages
2,152
Chords are in positions but scales are not in "positions" unless you want to sound like John Mayer.

The late Ted Greene was awesome in explaining how to play over chord changes but some of his books are traditional sheet music. Have you checked out Frank Gambale's stuff? Also do you have a piano type thing. That helps tremendously with theory.
 

Clifford-D

Senior Member
Messages
17,045
Frank Gambale - Techniques book 1 & 2.

Book 1 talks about 90% of what we use, book 2 covers the more exotic stuff.

I've recommended these books, especially book 1, for years now.
Low verbage, maximum clarity and usage. Outlines and diagrams.

This is a reference book, not a guitar course. Imo, the best books are books that can be used for reference and are not bogged down by excessive talking.

I've been collecting the best guitar books as a hobby since the '80s. I have 200 of the best books out there, the complete REH Hotlicks series, Most Howard Roberts books Ted Greene books, Steve Kahn books, Real books, and on and on,,, plus all the magazines that were of interest to me. Plus 28 years of teaching as my day gig,,, and the best outline of scales is in those Gambale books.

This is just my opinion, but the books are standout and very interesting in presentation. And an excellent companion to any other book/study.

Sheets Of Sound by Jack Zucker is another low verbage book that is one of the best books on picking, hybrid, alternate, sweep and economy picking styles. This is a book on how to shred with intelligence.

A couple other excellent book discussions on pents are,

•Jerry Berginzi - volume 2 Pentatonics
•Steve Kahn - Pentatonic Kahncepts

Those books have lots of words that provide excellent explanations to most any confusion, it's all about the straight path, and they're good reads too.
 
Last edited:

guitarjazz

Member
Messages
23,124
I've searched everywhere and I ended up buying "Mastering The Fretboard" by Troy Stetina.

While I'm sure this a a great book, I can't seem to bond with it or keep my focus. Also the hearing training, which is usefull, is not something I want to get into right now.


What I need:

Pentatonic / major / minor / blues scales explained

I've learned my pentatonic scale in the 5 different positions, but I have no idea what to do with them now. How to connect them en create something melodic.

So How to play the scales, different positions, and how to combine them

Solo techniques... also usefull practice methods I can do at home

An explanation of how to solo over the rhythm chords... switching between keys/scales

I've been playing for over 10 years and everything is still like rocket science to me.

I can't read music sheets, only tab notation.

So are there any books or dvds someone could recommend me, helping me to figure out the guitar and its playing bit by bit?

Taking lessons would be ideal ofcourse, but there is no room in my budget to afford a teachee.
Here's the practice method I used when I first learned the pentatonic scale:
Put the first Paul Butterfield album on turntable , starting with Born In Chicago, noodle around till I'm sure of the key, start jamming with and copying Bloomfield and gang.
You could use this method too.
 

Clifford-D

Senior Member
Messages
17,045
Here's the practice method I used when I first learned the pentatonic scale:
Put the first Paul Butterfield album on turntable , starting with Born In Chicago, noodle around till I'm sure of the key, start jamming with and copying Bloomfield and gang.
You could use this method too.
That was how I was introduced to pents I believe, East West 1966 was the deviginization of my ears to pentatonic scales. That and early Stones.
 

Dimitri

Member
Messages
247
I'm gonna check some of those books out now ... thanks for the help so far. Any more recommendations are welcome!
Unfortunately no piano around the house
 

LaceSensor1

Senior Member
Messages
3,429
How to apply scales. This will teach you application of scales. This is a great book I own. For sale on amazon.


 

frdagaa

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
2,486
I have lots of books including many of the ones mentioned in the post above (though I don't have the Frank Gambale ones). But I don't have a strong recommendation for a book for your situation.

I do have a VERY strong recommendation, however, for getting the magazine GuitarTechniques in electronic format, e.g. for the iPad. As a magazine it of course is not a linear method, but there is so much good information in that magazine for a very reasonable amount of money. The electronic format is done extremely well. It is much cheaper than buying the individual magazines, or a subscription to the print magazine. I think it is about $35 a year. Best money you can spend on general guitar instruction, IMO.
 

Dimitri

Member
Messages
247
Just checked some of the books out and have looked at some of the previews

Well, it might be worth mentioning that I have no clue about I II II patterns and such...

So I guess I need the very beginnings to start learning?
 

adauria

Member
Messages
532
I'd recommend you check out truefire.com. Browse through the VAST library of courses and find some that interest you and are at the right level. They all generally have a few sample video/tab lessons from each course so you can preview the material. It's really quality stuff (though there is a degree of variance from instructor to instructor and course to course).

I'm learned a ton of things from that site (all access pass is well worth the money, especially when it goes on sale for 40-50% off!).

-Andrew
 

derekd

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
44,977
Sounds like to me you have some holes in your knowledge and ability.

I'd seek out a teacher for at least a few face-to-face lessons. Let him know what you can do and where you want to go.

Good luck.
 

cubistguitar

Member
Messages
6,070
If you can't do a teacher at the moment use something like Truefire to get some visual as well as audible help.

Maybe something like their Beginning Blues Rock Soloing lesson. Probably enough there for a few months. Some theory is needed, at least in my mind, you need to think in terms of the tonic chord, the V chord, the IV chord, those kind of lables are the basics, not sure best source of this rudimentary stuff. A teacher would be great at the stage your at now.
 

Dimitri

Member
Messages
247
thanks! will have a look at those books!
A teacher would be the best thing for me, but I've just bought a house... and teachers are extremely expensive. So I can't afford it at this point
 

Wolfboy1

Grandpa but...Not Yet Old!
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
9,177
I call my Truefire courses my little instructors on the shelf :)
I have a ton of their courses from over the last 15 years (200+). These days I only get digital downloads if I feel the need to buy one. there are some excellent instructors at TF some of them do skype lessons. They also just started "Learning Pathways" for beginers of to pros focus on subject matter as taught by a variety of their instructors. I bet you could find some helpful stuff. I recommend Jeff McErlain highly.
 

Darth Gain

Member
Messages
133
I have the Gambale book. It is a good book, came with a cassette (bought it around 1990). I used the old REH books back in the day. MI Press by Hal Leonard seems to be the successor to REH now. The REH books had a lot of GIT instructors as authors then.

I just picked up a copy of Blues Soloing by Keith Wyatt by MI Press to refresh what I've forgotten, never learned or ignored. Anything by Wyatt is very good. It might be what the OP is looking for. Speaking only for myself, I grew up on hair metal, neoclassical and fusion, so I need to work on blues, it doesn't come naturally for me.
 

InkStained

Member
Messages
4,012
Truefire seems pretty cool. Dumb question: Any problem downloading the lessons to a humble acer chromebook? Anyone know?
 

Rob G

Member
Messages
2,423
You might want to consider joining my TrueFire classroom, Guitar Babylon. For 2017 we've lowered the price from $149 to $99, so now it's $99 a month. I can help you apply your scales in a musical way and play over chord changes. Feel free to email me at rob@robgarland.net to ask questions and for more info.

Classroom link: https://truefire.com/private-lessons/classrooms/guitar-babylon/i9371

Cheers!

Here's a recent example of my playing:

 






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