interested in learning jazz guitar

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by Romeo Delight, Feb 6, 2015.

  1. Romeo Delight

    Romeo Delight Member

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    I'm interested in learning jazz guitar. I usually play hard rock and blues but I want to learn more different styles and i've been playing for a while. Are there any books you can recommend for beginning jazz guitar? thanks
     
  2. guitarjazz

    guitarjazz Member

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    Mickey Baker Jazz Guitar Vol. 1 has been the entrance for many a rocker.
    Get a Real Book Vol. I.
     
  3. jimipage

    jimipage Member

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    i would really recommend a teacher. What you lack in learning from books is a systematic and efficiant approach to learning jazz. You need this because jazz takes years to learn, and there is no easy gratification that you get from playing pentatonic scales in blues or rock. So, finding a jazz teacher is crucial, since he/she will show you the most efficient path towards the jazz musical terrain.

    In the meantime, I would learn some solos by Grant Green or Wes Montgomery, learn the melodic minor scale(and explore it's modes), and focus on jazz phrasing. Youre gonna feel kinda silly when you first try to swing, but it will become second nature through the months and years. And the most important skill is to listen intently on how the greats played over typical chord progressions.

    For some books, the Jody Fisher series is pretty good. Sid Jacob's Complete Book of Jazz Guitar Lines is helpful for vocabulary. There's also a video/booklet by Clint Strong that's very good (some clips from the vid are on YT). And, try joining online guitar guitar lessons by Jimmy Bruno. The best books for jazz guitar are more intermediate/advanced stuff, not the beginning stuff.
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2015
  4. Noah

    Noah Supporting Member

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  5. Bluesful

    Bluesful Supporting Member

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    I was going to suggest this.

    I've got a copy on the way and can't wait to get into it.
     
  6. JonR

    JonR Member

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    I wouldn't recommend a book at all.
    I'd recommend listening to Charlie Christian solos and trying to learn them by ear.

    Worked for Wes Montgomery... ;)

    And now we have what Wes didn't have (and would probably have killed for): slowdown software, free or very cheap.

    this:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ce9Jtl9D6FQ
    and this:
    http://www.seventhstring.com/
    ...and off you go :)

    And OK, maybe a book or two will help smooth your progress, but I'd suggest a Real Book, a collection of jazz standards in notation, so you can pick up the common chord progressions (even if you can't read the tunes). That will help you recognise what you're hearing when listening to jazz.

    As you're already playing guitar (and improvising in blues?), there are not really any different techniques in jazz. You need to know your instrument, of course. And jazz has a few more chords than hard rock and blues do - so there's a learning curve there. I have nothing against jazz tuition sites - the more resources you can exploit, the better. There's lots of assistance out there, but no short cuts; don't let various methods and systems distract you from the real work: listening and copying is what it comes down to in the end; always did, always will.
     
  7. fenderlead

    fenderlead Member

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    Yes, listening to Charlie Christian with Benny Goodman sextet.

    What style(s) of Jazz guitar, because there are a lot of them and Miles Davis Modal and Fusion stuff is different to Charlie Christian and Barney Kessel.

    Someone can play a simple blues in a jazz style and jazz blues often have a more iim V7 based turnaround which leads to being able to play over iim V7 I chord progressions that are found in Jazz standards and Jazz blues and knowing how chord tones on the on beats tend to sound combined with chromatic passing notes on weaker beats and also interval jumps on weaker beats in order to carve out lines around chord progressions because it's basically like Bach with swing and some Blues, and modal Jazz can be played in more of a non chord tone scales sort of way but it depends on what the player wants to do.

    A simple blues and listening to Kenny Burrell play a simple blues is where I would tend to start, keep it simple.




     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2015
  8. russintexas

    russintexas Member

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    What are you really looking to gain out of learning jazz?

    There are, as I've experienced, three groups of people who want to learn jazz.

    1) People who love the music.
    2) People who think they "should" learn jazz
    3) People who want to become better players and view jazz as a vehicle

    If you're in group 2, please find another reason to learn jazz before you start-- otherwise, this will be a short-lived journey.

    So, that brings us to the real question: what are you listening to
     
  9. fenderlead

    fenderlead Member

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    Some Jazz riffs for a minor chord, using things like chromatic passing notes (weak beats) and chord tones (strong beats) and arpeggios and scale intervals and interval jumps and line contour (line contour is how the notes join together ie descending ascending sequencing etc etc).

    It's harmonically very simple (just a minor chord) but it still sounds jazzy because of the phrasing and things mentioned above.

    Jazz sort of phrasing and playing can be done on a single chord and more complex progressions can be dealt with as time goes by, which is a good song to learn btw :D




     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2015
  10. jimipage

    jimipage Member

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    That Charlie Christian clip is pure swing!! That feel and phrasing is what you should try to emulate.

    I forgot to mention the book that probably influenced my playing the most: Pat Martino "Linear Expressions". Great source of vocab.
     
  11. Petimar

    Petimar Member

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    Look up the Jazz Guitar Forum too!
     
  12. Romeo Delight

    Romeo Delight Member

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    i'm in groups 1 and 3. I listen to a lot of django reindhard, donald byrd, and dorothy ashby. I just want to learn jazz to help me become more versatile and help me with chords. I play alot of lead but I want to shape up my rhythm playing too
     
  13. dingusmingus

    dingusmingus Member

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    yep!

    For books, I highly recommend Introduction to Jazz Guitar Soloing by Joe Elliott.
     
  14. s2y

    s2y Member

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  15. Bryan T

    Bryan T Guitar Owner Silver Supporting Member

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    Interesting list! If you want to get into gypsy jazz, I'd recommend learning Django tunes and solos ("Minor Swing" is a great place to start). John Jorgenson has a great set of books on gypsy jazz that will get you going.
     
  16. Clifford-D

    Clifford-D Member

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    I might suggest you go the other direction, instead of Christian and the older guys, I would listen to the more rock/jazz/blues/crossover affected modern players, I'm mostly talking about is listening, close listening, and transcribing, just bits and pieces, the little things that interest you. As far as a more formal jazz education, it's up to you to design a short and long term goal. You need a list of the items you need to study, many of that is in succession. That is one thing where TGP can help so much. Next where to get these studies. I personally like the junior colleges that offer jazz classes. I recommend composition and arranging classes as well as any improvisation classes you can get into. These classes become a great reason to learn about Charlie and Wes and a whole bunch of other guys like Parker, Miles, Coltrane, Evans, Mingus, Herbie, Pass, Burell, Green, Martino, Metheny, Scofield, Ford, Frisell, and so on. All essential listening.

    Private teachers are a good way to go,,, if the teacher knows what they are talking about, and trust me, there are far to many people that teach that really should be students. It's your job to recognize this and be the captain of your ship.

    On line is a way to go, lots there. Incredible lessons.

    Most important imo is for you to become your own best teacher. Every thing you learn from an outside source like another person, you have to receive that info, become clear on definitions and any application and mechanics. You have to teach yourself how to use what the teacher just taught you, some people are really bad at this and don't learn things very quickly, in one ear, out the other, it's your job to "capture" it and make it real and "own" it.
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2015
  17. tacorivers

    tacorivers Silver Supporting Member

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    I don't think the whole "just figure out some Charlie Parker licks" is very helpful. When people say that that is how [insert famous jazz musician did it] they forget to mention the fact that said jazz musicians practiced for HOURS for DECADES. Its not like Miles Davis learned bebop in a year, or even five years. Read his autobiography (or any jazz biography) and you will be amazed at the time that most of the jazz greats put into their craft. They played every night, for hours, with the best musicians available at the time.
     
  18. guitarjazz

    guitarjazz Member

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    Since that scene atrophied they now play with their Jamey Aebersold CD's, every night, for hours.
     
  19. vintagelove

    vintagelove Member

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    One of the most important hurdles is understanding how jazz harmony works. The REALLY short version is

    Chords tend to move up a 4th, ii V I being the building blocks of many tunes (along with rhythm changes).

    Chord functions (this is not 100% of the time, but a lot)

    min7 = ii
    Dom7 = V
    maj7 = I (also IV)

    min7b5 = ii in a minor key

    Remember, sometimes there is no I chord. For instance

    dm7 G7 gm7 C7 cm7 F7 Bbmaj7

    is really

    ii V in C

    ii V in F

    ii V I in Bb


    Once you get used to seeing it, standards make a ton of sense.


    Have fun!!!
     
  20. dsimon665

    dsimon665 Supporting Member

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    its great fun. many areas to grow in.
    good advice so far...

    regards to "Real book" recommendation...its good to use that in combination with actual performances. Fakebooks can be incorrect, or have a certain "straight" interpretation. Listening to recordings will give an idea of how people actually play any given tune.

    There's also "styles"/feels ...so you might hear/play a tune in a bossa style, or swing, or even gypsy jazz style. Same tune, different style. That's something else to consider about what's in a fakebook vs. the recordings you hear.

    take the tune "autumn leaves"...you can hear people play it in those three styles and more.
     

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