Interesting Article - Are Expensive Guitars Worth It?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by gjohnson441496lpjr, Apr 13, 2019 at 2:25 PM.

  1. zwiefldraader

    zwiefldraader Member

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    what the "man don't get" is pretty much what you said out.

    Please people, read first, criticise the content after that. Not the other way round.
     
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  2. Stinky Kitty

    Stinky Kitty Silver Supporting Member

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    Nobody I know is working 60 hours a week for a Cort. For most of us, it's never been about what we need. It's what we want. This explains why I've never rushed to the front door to sign for a Samick. Of course expensive guitars aren't absolutely necessary but to paraphrase from the movie "The Color of Money"

    Equipment we want is twice as sweet as equipment we need.
     
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  3. Pongo

    Pongo Member

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    It wasn't a bad article. Being on TGP a lot, the topic is fairly obvious and played out to me, but the general point -- that higher end guitars are nicer, but there are a lot of sweet guitars available that can get the job done for much less -- is worth knowing (or being reminded of).
     
  4. Exiled_On_Main_St

    Exiled_On_Main_St Member

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    No it’s not.

    Locking tuners increase stability and make it easier to restring.
    A Graphite nut increases tuning stability and reduces string breakage.
    Compound radius on a guitar makes playing and bending more comfortable at all areas of the neck.
    Compound necks make it easier to play at all areas of the necks.
    Contours on the body of the guitar make for a more comfortable playing experience.
    Contoured heels make for easier access to higher frets.
    Single piece bodies are generally of better quality.

    That make a massive difference. It’s the difference between a guitar that has low quality parts, and high quality parts, and a higher attention to detail. How is that meaningless?
     
  5. HERSCHEL

    HERSCHEL Member

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    I like locking tuners, but unless you're a whammy freak they don't do anything for tuning stability. My only two guitars that came with locking tuners were below $750.
    I like Graphtech nuts, but bone and Corian do the job too. Bone is often considered "premium".
    Compound radius and necks are preferences. I like them, but I'm not everyone.
    Many sub-$1000 guitars have contours, many over-$1000 guitars don't (see: Telecasters, Les Pauls) My Les Pauls are my only non-contoured bodies.
    Many sub-$1000 guitars have contoured heals, many over-$1000 guitars don't.
    Single-piece bodies are meaningless.
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2019 at 6:05 AM
  6. toomanyamps

    toomanyamps Member

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    No, it was a bad article.
    To get his point across he claims his HWY cost "half" what a USA Standard cost at the time. That is completely inaccurate.
    He claims an Epiphone is "better" than most guitars in it's price range, this has no basis in fact.
     
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  7. derekd

    derekd Supporting Member

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    This old debate again?

    First, guitar players are spoiled. Have you checked prices on other pro level wooden instruments like violins and cellos? You could buy a nice car or new house for what some people pay for those.

    Second, at some point, the law of diminishing returns kicks in. Like any other high end product (think stereos), you get incremental improvement the more money you spend, probably somewhere around $1,000-$1,500. The big reason why I have all nicer guitars is because I have a hard time getting the specs I want from off the shelf builders.

    Everyone has to find the place where budget, sound and playability intersect. Gonna be a different place for people.
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2019 at 8:51 AM
  8. p.mo

    p.mo Supporting Member

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    I like this post. I'd really like to see a "Grown in America" movement. Where all the parts of the guitar - the wood, the electronics, the steel - all of it made and assembled in the US. To me, that would be worth the additional cost, too.
     
  9. LagunaMan

    LagunaMan Member

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    As I play longer I better understand what features are important to me in a guitar. It's not entirely only about quality anymore. To help others, I was impressed with Jackson's Js10 guitar($110), Laguna le300($350), Dean custom zone 2($240) and Ibanez rg350mz($300). Those four were flawless and had features that cost much higher in other brands. If I was shopping for a strat and I didn't cared about the large headstock then the squier standard strat would do or a used fender american strat for $600. Maybe a new fender mexican player series strat that just came out. My personal cutoff would be about $1500 because for that amount of money I can build a custom guitar for myself. Out of the seven electric guitars I have I play my warmoth strat the most because I put it together and painted it myself. Anything one creates with his own hands and puts his heart into has more value than a store bought item.
     
  10. sksmith66

    sksmith66 Supporting Member

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    I've never had any trouble selling expensive guitars. sold plenty of them in the $3-$6k range. never takes more than a couple weeks.
    martin does torriefied wood too. they call it the vintage tone system.
     
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  11. DrumBob

    DrumBob Gold Supporting Member

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    It's a well written article from a journalistic standpoint, and he's right. Those of you who refuse to read it should take a few minutes and do so. I thought it would be a hack job. It's not. It's all common sense.
     
  12. explorer rob

    explorer rob TGP=Tickoff Great Players

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    How it feels in my hands is most important. How it sounds to my ear is next. Then I'll look at the price tag.
     
  13. Jaguar

    Jaguar Member

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    I have 2 low-priced guitars (Yamaha 320 Revstar € 185, Squier JMascis Jazzmaster € 400) en 1 low-midpriced guitar (Fender Sergio Vallin Strat € 470) and 1 midpriced guitar (Fender CP Jaguar € 900,-), I am not much of an expert (home player/THR10 + pedals) but somehow I feel/ hear that the super expensive super guitars at some point start to sound so perfect and smooth that they lose some of the Rock & Roll to my ears (I hear it in the music store and even on YT). I don't know ... when it becomes too perfect it is starting to sound boring to my ears!? Like R&R is a muscle car and not a Red Ferrari..!? Hope I don't offend anyone, when you like a guitar, it is expensive and you can pay for it, great!! And maybe this is just a stupid theory of mine... :)
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2019 at 9:50 AM
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  14. MmcGrouty

    MmcGrouty Member

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    I have a few fairly expensive guitars, and I don’t regret buying any of them. You can see the extra work that went into them, be it the perfect fretwork or complex inlay work or whatever. I still play my cheaper guitars often though, I like variety. I have a MIM tele that’s spectacular. You can get good cheap guitars, but there’s also expensive guitars that are worth it.
     
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  15. GCDEF

    GCDEF Supporting Member

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    Disagree about the well written from a journalistic standpoint. It's all conjecture. No facts, no research just somebody spouting random opinions based on pretty much nothing.
     
  16. fishleehooker

    fishleehooker Supporting Member

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    The law of diminishing returns is very real...and yet: What do you think the difference between champions we celebrate fro many years and the people who got 2nd and 3rd place? Its very very small. Carl Lewis is a legend and often beat his opponents by a hundredth or even a thousandth of a second. So those little things are the difference between Michael Jordan and Dominique Wilkins for example. Jordan will be remembered and possibly celebrated forever. Wilkins was nearly as good, but won't be remembered much past a generation or 2. SO yeah, there is diminishing returns, but those small returns can be the difference in making it and not.

    True story when it comes to high-end stuff: In the 90s I was a pretty decent High School wrestler. Good enough for colleges to look at, but hardly a legend in the making. My senior year I talked my mom into getting me for my birthday some 155 dollar Adidas wrestling shoes that had to be imported from Germany. I was one of the few guys that had them and people dug them. I actually still have people give me props about them. Did they make me wrestle better? Uh...no, not really. But I looked good in them and liked them. A lot more than any other shoe I had or have now. In factor, I have found out that there is a market for used wrestling shoes that are classics and that my shoes are worth over 1500 dollars!? That's kinda weird. But I still love those shoes so much, that I often have them out on display in my room, or hanging off a hook.
    So having nice things, that are hard to get, can kind of pay off down the road and during ownership can be very satisfying. And those things can sometimes become classics and much desired. Back to guitars, I put the same strings in my expensive guitars as my cheap ones; I am not using gold that is cryogenically frozen or anything. Using a tortex pick, like most people. But I like the way some of these guitars feel that are more expensive. They feel amazing. Feel is what made me propose to my wife: it felt right so I asked.
     
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  17. DrumBob

    DrumBob Gold Supporting Member

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    I don't disagree on the lack of facts. He may lack facts, but it's well put together from a grammatical standpoint. I should have been clear on my end.
     
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  18. GCDEF

    GCDEF Supporting Member

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    I'll give you that. A more in depth discussion of what the extra money buys you with specific comparisons of models and a few artists that play imports and the reasons they play them would have made it better journalisticly.
     
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  19. rickt

    rickt Gold Supporting Member

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    Are inexpensive guitars worth it? Maybe, same as expensive guitars. The question really is do you find value in the price you paid for your guitar?

    I'm a player and not a tinkerer. I don't want to buy guitar on the cheap and then start modding it until it plays and sounds the way I want. There's no value there because I was dissatisfied with my purchase to begin with and risked additional capital (money) to maybe get it to the point where it sounds and plays according to my original expectation.

    I find the boutique guitars will typically meet or exceed my expectations. It doesn't necessarily mean I will purchase that guitar as I have a budget to maintain. I'd rather have no guitar than an instrument that disappoints every time I play it.
     
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  20. Jayyj

    Jayyj Supporting Member

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    There's point I think gets missed in these discussions, which is that we try to stack these subjects as an objective discussion, about what we need to spend to get a guitar that will get the job done and about diminishing returns and so on, but for most of us we don't buy guitars objectively - we buy with our hearts, and our heads then play catch up trying to justify it. For the vast majority of us we're not professionals buying tools, we're buying leisure items that make us happy and everything from luxury to status to self-actualising and all manner of horrendous marketing terms come into play.

    I haven't bought a guitar because I needed it to do a job since the 1990s - I ticked those boxes and got a couple of decades of those early purchases doing the job perfectly well. I keep buying guitars because I love them and they make me happy - they cost what they cost, and if it's worth it to me I'll buy it.
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2019 at 5:25 PM

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