Interesting interview with Jennifer Batten 30 years ago

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by eichaan, Jul 15, 2019.

  1. eichaan

    eichaan Member

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    When working on my blog post for this month I found the interview with cover artist Jennifer Batten to be quite interesting. What really jumped out at me upon re-reading the July, 1989 issue is how unusual it was to have a woman on the cover.

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    My collection of Guitar Player magazines consists of 284 issues from 1986-2010, and the number of women who made the cover in that span can be counted on Django Reinhardt’s fingers:

    1. July 1987: Liona Boyd (along with Alex Lifeson, Ed Bickert and Rik Emmett)
    2. July, 1998: Bonnie Raitt
    3. November, 1998: Meredith Brooks
    4. March, 2003: Chrissie Hynde (with Adam Seymour)
    5. January, 2005: Allison Robertson
    Now to be fair, 4 issues are missing their covers, but somehow I doubt that they have women musicians on the cover. Leaving aside the question of “who did they omit?”, there are at least three issues with Jimi Hendrix on the cover–the editors must have figured that a man who had been dead for decades would sell better at the newsstand than a real, live woman.

    So the point is, Jennifer Batten being on the cover all by herself is a very special honor for a woman musician. I am not surprised that they tasked Joe Gore to write the article; he seemed to be the guy who wrote about “young” and/or “technique” artists at the time and of course for the last several years he has written for Premier Guitar, a periodical that seems to have no trouble finding a wide range of women guitarists to profile. The feature in this month’s issue kicked off with a unique, sideways, two-page spread:

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    and as you can see, Gore addressed the topic of how rare it was to see women instrumentalists in 1989. The picture comes from Batten’s time as lead guitarist for Michael Jackson’s world tour. The interview was comparatively short (only 7 partial pages), but there were some good bits, such as:

    You’ve managed to succeed in a very male-dominated profession. Why do you think there are so few prominent women guitarists?

    It’s partly because there’s no precedent. Maybe a lot of boys coming up can really identify with all the rockers they see on MTV or at concerts. When I was coming up, there were only a few women soloists, like Emily Remler. But I think things will be completely different in the 1990s….And if I can influence people that way, it’s great.

    But there is still a lot of resistance, isn’t there? Haven’t you been in situations where you were discriminated against because of your gender?

    Well, I heard that there was an audition for Ozzy Osbourne’s band. It was a big deal in town, and everybody knew about it–he even advertised on the radio asking for tapes. I know I got my promo packs into the right hands. I put so much time into learning all of Jake E. Lee’s and Randy Rhoads’ solos but I didn’t even get an audition. It would be one thing if they didn’t like my tone or the way I looked, but to not even get in was a real drag. The hard rock scene is completely dominated by white males with long hair….Considering what a creative art form music is, it’s amazing how bands clone themselves.

    Some stereotypes die hard.

    I don’t have much patience for stereotypes or generalizations of any kind. One of the biggest stereotypes about women is that they are “too emotional”. But isn’t music pure emotion? If that’s the case, there should be 2% males in music and 98% women.

    …It’s a shock for some people to see a woman playing the guitar. All over the world, on the Michael Jackson tour, people would ask me whether I was a man or a woman. Just because I played guitar, they assumed I was a guy.

    You mean it was easier for them to believe that the guitar player was a man who looked like a woman than that she was actually female?

    Yeah. It was a drag. I’d stand there with my blonde hair, red lipstick, and caked on stage makeup and think “Thank you, Poison! Thank you, Cinderella! You’ve confused the children of the world.” People weren’t malicious about it–they didn’t realize that I wanted to deck them.

    Is it possible that some of our concepts of “good guitar playing” are excessively male? What about the image of the guitar hero/gunslinger, or the excessive emphasis on technique?

    Well, I’m still into chops–I can appreciate that as much as the next guy. I wouldn’t consider myself a shrapnel shredder, but I think that’s something important to have in your playing. But the gunslinger attitude is pretty jive. The whole competitive thing gets pretty old, because it gets so far away from the art of music. If you have chops, they’ll say you have no soul. If you play blues, they’ll say you have no chops. If you play jazz, you’re too old. If you play punk, you’re an idiot. I’ve been there myself, and I’ve done the slagging. When I was at GIT I was slagging the rockers. Being with Michael Jackson, I could really see what the slag scene was all about. He sold 40 million copies of Thriller and 20 million copies of Bad. He’s the most beloved entertainer in the world, yet reviewers constantly shredded him to bits.

    Are you concerned about being able to get your music across, given the limited number of images that the music industry allows female artists to have?

    I think about that, but I don’t really have an answer. Before the Jackson gig, I was totally into the music side, and I’d never thought about the image side. I’d go into a rage whenever a bandleader asked me what I was going to wear to the gig. I’d think, “What does it matter? Who cares?” But it does matter. But I will definitely not go for the slut-rocker look. I despise that and it would take away from any respect that I might get. When I see ads in the guitar mags with a girl in a bikini holding up a product, I read it as “Our product really sucks, so we have to do something else to get your attention.” It does nothing for raising the respect for women. Come on! Billy Sheehan doesn’t do those Yamaha ads wearing a jock strap!

    Wow. It’s true that there was such a “glam” aspect of “hair metal” in the 1980s that most men in the scene had teased hair and wore makeup, but this is such a textbook example of what people don’t see, they can’t conceive of. Even with a woman playing in front of their eyes, their brains told them they must be looking at a man. Of course, this is why it’s a shame that Guitar Player couldn’t find a way to fit in more women cover artists over the years (and a credit to Gore for bringing that up, if obliquely). By the way, here is a video of Jennifer Batten playing “Dirty Diana” with Michael Jackson. The solo on the record was played by Steve Stevens, who definitely could have confused some people gender-wise when he and Billy Idol were on top of the charts. Anyway, this was the tune that she was able to “stretch out on” and you’ll get an idea of how much of a “rocker” Batten was:




    The final quotes come from the part about the Michael Jackson tour. Even after reading what she said about MJ’s record sales, it may be hard for some to remember just how huge of a global star Jackson was, but Jennifer Batten’s role in his band was definitely high profile.

    How did you land the audition for his band?

    I heard about it from Steve Trovato, a guitarist friend of mine. I tried to set up the audition for the latest possible date so I could stay home and shred Michael Jackson tunes night and day. The actual audition was by myself in front of a video camera. They said they wanted to hear some funk rhythms, so that’s what I started out with. Then I went into solo land. I played my solo version of Coltrane’s “Giant Steps”, and then I played the “Beat It” solo, which I’d been playing for years in Top-40 bands. I had heard they wanted a certain look, but I’d never paid attention to how I looked before–I’m not into that at all. This [indicating her mass of dyed blonde hair] was his idea.

    When I got the call saying that they wanted me, they asked two questions: “Can you tour for a year?” and “Do you mind an image change?” I said, “Do what you want”, so when the tour started in Japan I had a three-foot Mohawk. Michael had hired a designer who made drawings of how everyone was supposed to look before we even started rehearsing. The drawings looked great, but in real life we were some ugly people onstage.

    How long did you rehearse before the tour?

    For six weeks. It was the most intense rehearsal I’ve ever done. Every nuance was worked out, mostly before we even met Michael. Sometimes we worked 12 hour days….Greg Phillinganes was the musical director, and he has the most incredible ears. We rehearsed at mega-DBs, and if just one vocal part was off for one note in the third bar he’d hear it and remember it. Michael had suggestions for people, and he was very cool to work with. He has unbelievable patience and a low stress level. He never raised his voice once during the entire tour, unlike some people who fire and rehire band members every weekend. After the tour started, we hardly saw him at all. But a couple of times we closed down amusement parks and all went together. That’s the only way to see Tokyo Disneyland, man.

    One of your spotlights was the “Beat It” solo. Did you play Eddie Van Halen’s solo note for note?

    Yeah. Backstage at Madison Square Garden, Will Lee asked me if it was on tape! I guess it was a back-handed compliment, but it made me wonder how many people thought it was on tape. As I played I was wearing a fiber-optic suit that changed colors, and so did the guitar. I had to put glow-in-the-dark tape on the neck to mark the frets so I wouldn’t get lost. Lights were flashing, so it was like moving through a strobe-lit disco. A few times somebody stepped on the cord that connected my suit to the computer–I almost got whiplash. I’d played the solo for years, but with Michael it was more challenging because the tempo was faster than the record and the guitars were tuned down two whole-steps to C for that song, so I had to use heavy-gauge strings. Plus I had to move around and jump up and down. I usually stand still when I solo.

    This was a really good interview, and I enjoyed re-reading it. I remember being struck by the part where she said that “If Jeff Beck wanted a rhythm player, I’d jump on that in a second”, and then years later she ended up getting the gig to be in Beck’s band for a couple of years, which is really cool, and another great resume item. It’s funny, though, that I (and I’m sure lots more people) recognize Jennifer Batten as an exceptional guitarist from her having been on the cover of Guitar Player. I wonder how many other great instrumentalists I don’t know of because GP decided to do yet another Eric Clapton cover story instead?
     
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  2. somecafone

    somecafone Member

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    I remember an issue from my days reading monthly.
    In about 84 or 85, they did a “Women In Rock” issue.

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    Gads!!!
    It was 83!!!
     
  3. forgivenman

    forgivenman Member

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    who cares about her gender? She's amazing. Great musicians are great musicians, regardless of their chromosomes.
     
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  4. SnidelyWhiplash

    SnidelyWhiplash Supporting Member

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    I remember this interview very well. I think that she stated that when she was at Berklee, she practiced in the women's bathroom because she had almost total privacy. A great musician whose style was rendered obsolete just a couple of years later.

    Looks like the " idiots " were victorious...
     
  5. Misterbulbous

    Misterbulbous Member

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  6. Nebakanezer

    Nebakanezer Member

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    My favorite quote from her is when I saw her at a clinic:
    “While you guys keep sucking on your Les Pauls, I’m gonna be tearing it up on my Washburn.”
    To be fair, she was in a room full of mostly older dudes......
     
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  7. Misterbulbous

    Misterbulbous Member

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    Yeah...her and Carlos Cavazo rockin' those Washburn's. Tbh, her sig model was hideous.

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  8. Nebakanezer

    Nebakanezer Member

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    Doing the math, it would have been not to long after she came out with the behind the nut clamper string dampener thing (mid 90s?). I went up to A&E Music in Va. Beach to see her. My friend worked at the local music store in N.C. and said she stopped in for a few (on the way to or from), and asked if they had any of those dampeners. By chance they did, they were a Washburn dealer.
     
  9. Davepitt11

    Davepitt11 Member

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    I had that Batten issue. I also had the issue with Emmett, Lifeson, Boyd and Bickert. That one came with a flexi disc that had a song Emmett composed with each of the others doing their thing. A little classical piece for Boyd, jazz for Bickert and a flanged/delayed lead part for Lifeson.
     
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  10. guitarmike

    guitarmike Member

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    What a shame we as a society can't see past the image. She is a very good player that can hold her own next to anyone.
     
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  11. DustyRhodesJr

    DustyRhodesJr Supporting Member

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    She is awesome.

    Just in the last issue or two, a guy in either GP or GW listed her as one of his
    main influences.

    Cant recall who it is, but it was kind of neat that she received the mention.
     
  12. ned7flat5

    ned7flat5 Member

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    On the early years GP used to have pedal steel players, classical and flamenco guitarists and mainstream jazz guys featured on the covers.

    Had they continued in that vein they could’ve had plenty of female classical guitarist cover stories but, then, as now, they went largely unnoticed in the popular guitar world.

    Once publishers figured out how to sell more guitar magazines, every magazine had EVH on the cover as often as possible. I know this because those are the very editions which are most absent from my collection. I suspect they were sold out in the US even before they could have made it to the newsstands in Australia.

    At the time, Jennifer Batten was probably the most promotable female guitarist who appealed to a wide guitar demographic with her connections to Jeff Beck, Michael Jackson and the tapping thing which she took into the “jazz realm” with a version of Giant Steps. I can’t think of any other female guitarist of that time who had anything close to that set of credentials. Plus her then “look” was magazine publishing gold.

    However getting on the cover isn’t a cakewalk for most.

    Around 1990, I asked Tommy Emmanuel at a workshop when he was finally going to get some recognition in the US as he was obviously putting in the effort of touring the world but not getting any press whatsoever.

    He agreed he’d been overlooked by magazine publishers and at one point, while in LA, he himself had contacted GP to initiate an interview. He bemusedly recalled that an unenthusiastic GP reporter reluctantly agreed to meet him in his hotel room.

    Tommy played a few of his arrangements and the guy was blown away. He then admitted to Tommy that GP had been ignoring him because they figured he was a “happy jazz” guy. “We didn’t know you could play like that !!” he added.

    A month or so later, the particular GP magazine arrived in my part of the world with a half page article - no cover story but it was a start.
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2019
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  13. chumbucket

    chumbucket Supporting Member

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    Except for that time I saw her play with both Andy Timmons and Uli Jon Roth. Her tone and performance paled in comparison to those guys IMO.
     
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  14. Bluplirst

    Bluplirst Supporting Member

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    Tribal Rage is one of my favorite shred albums. Not many on that list....
     
  15. Telefunky

    Telefunky Member

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    She's best friends with my bandmate so I see her from time to time. We never talk about guitar, just general life stuff. She's so down-to-earth you get wrapped up in conversation and completely forget you're hanging with one of the baddest guitar players in the world.

    Sometimes it hits me later; why didn't I ask her to teach me some licks?!?
     
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  16. Telefunky

    Telefunky Member

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    Awesome! I'll pass that on to the bass player, Ricky Wolking, he's my bandmate. The entire record was just a jam session on some riffs he had. Every soundcheck with him is like hearing a new Tribal Rage record, we get pretty crazy and soundmen are like; what the hell was THAT?!?! hahaha
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2019
  17. Banditt

    Banditt Supporting Member

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    Telefunky...Cool! Jennifer lives in Portland and I've gotten to see her a bit too as she has gigged using a few players I know for backline. Just saw she's doing something with Gary Fountaine from Nu Shooz..That should be funky, he's a Monster.

    She's definately a Pioneer...anybody that can hang with Jeff Beck is Golden in my book! But it's humbling to know that she still needs to be out there working the angles, doing the merchandising, selling lessons just to make a living in this sad World. Ain't nobody who's not hustling out there....even Pioneers.
     
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  18. yfeefy

    yfeefy Member

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    Yeah I had the issue with the flexi disk, I think it was "beyond borders", or "No borders" or something. Very cool collaboration.
     
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  19. nowhere

    nowhere Member

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    "Beyond Borders" One of the first (perhaps the very first) guitar magazines I ever bought. Still have the flexi disc too! It introduced me to Ed Bickert for which I am grateful.

    I remember the Batten issue too. Reminds me that from around that time through to the mid 90's Joe Gore's articles in GP introduced me to a lot of great bands and musicians I had never heard of before.

    I do recall one of the magazine editors saying they found that news stand sales would tank whenever they didn't have a male hard rock guitarist or one of the classic rock guys on the cover. In the 90's though I remember GP doing a lot of covers that didn't fit that template and they seemed to do OK - I remember a "guitar in the movies" issue with Clint Eastwood in a scene from "The Good, The Bad and The Ugly" for example and several that were essentially cartoon illustrations. (Speaking of cartoons, anyone else remember Jim Ryan's "Guitar Sam" in Guitar World?)

    I would love it if Poison Ivy made the cover of GP, PG or GW!
     
  20. yfeefy

    yfeefy Member

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    I might still have mine (beyond borders) too. I have a few of them, but it will be a search to find them. I have one that came as a bonus track in Pichhio Dal Pozzo's "Abbeamo tutti i suoi problemi" vinyl record too, and one of my friend's band "the dark" from Boston Ma.

    Guitar player was such a good magazine, with great writing, great columns, and covered a wide spectrum. They had the monthly giveaway (never won) and the yearly poll with the "gallery of the greats" - Steve Howe, Steve Morse, man it's like the mag was written for me.
     
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