Internet says this is a Cover Band set list.

LeftyGtrPlr

Member
Messages
586
None of those see out of place except maybe Sublime and The Outfield songs. Other than that, seems pretty standard.
 

danelectro

Supporting Member
Messages
2,046
I've covered 32 of the 50 songs in bands I've played in over the years. I'd probably have to relearn half of them if I wanted to play them again.
 

xjojox

Tardis-dwelling wanker
Messages
5,726
GUILTY x35.
Yes, guilty is the appropriate word.
Happily, only a couple of them currently, and I've shot down suggestions for several others.
 

Yer Blues

Member
Messages
8,391
Seems more like a list of covers every classic rock cover band should know. :idea:
I play with two cover bands and I think American Girl and the Joker (as part of a medley) are the only songs either band plays regularly..... although there's definitely some songs on the list I'd love to play over many of the songs on the setlist.
 

xjojox

Tardis-dwelling wanker
Messages
5,726
My cover band has been having a little fun doing medleys, weaving more recognizable songs together with more obscure songs by the same artists. Mind you, we play mostly bars where filling a dance floor is not a priority (but the register always is).

Example: ZZ Top Medley (we're in TX after all). The segues are fun and interesting, lots of bluesy guitar boogie, plus a wake up call when I get to scramble to slip my slide on and off. We start obscure and end pop but don't do anything nauseating or with droning synth:

Thunderbird ("What's that?"; One or two folks grin)
La Grange ("Oh, that's ZZ Top! Was that first part ZZ Top?" The two grinners are rolling their eyes)
Heard It On The X ("Hmmm, I think I've heard this...this is ZZ Top too, right?" The two grinners are now high fiving)
Pearl Necklace (Girls start dancing and miming rubbing something on their chests. Biker dudes buy them drinks. All is good at the register).
 

stratotastic

Member
Messages
7,243
I know it may be a shock to some people, but an audience in a bar listening to a cover band isn't full of people with sophisticated tastes. What they are full of are people who want to act goofy for a bit after downing a few drinks and, if that is happening, put money in a tip jar.

If you are looking for musical satisfaction, do not play in a cover band.

I tried that. I made a set list that in my mind would kill. Great songs that I liked. We did them well. How did it go? We now have TWO Pat BenatOr songs on the list. A singing, dancing crowd playing a song I don't care for is better in this biz than playing a song I love and getting a polite smattering of applause. I still get to sneak a couple songs in that the band like, just for ourselves, but we know those aren't what is getting us invited back.

Success as a Cover Band has a lot to do with how strong your gag reflex is. We stop short of the Brown Eyed Girl, Mustang Sally stuff ... we play a list that's about 50% stuff we want ... and this is why there are cover bands who play more often and get paid more than us. I've accepted that. I know I could turn this into more, but as it is I feel that I'm already tickling the dragons tail.
Thanks for the injection of reality. That is how it actually works, as opposed to the armchair player's idea of b-sides and "play it your own way, maaaaann!" But people should also keep in mind that they're not limited to 'the list' and there are tons of songs out there that are awesome, fun to play, and will keep the crowd going. We have over 250 songs at this point, ranging from the classic rock mentioned in the list above, to modern pop hits, to self-indulgent songs we know just for ourselves but can whip out during certain gigs for certain crowds.
 

Silent Sound

Member
Messages
5,020
It's a good list. It accurately explains why I never go to bars with cover bands, why I'd never be in a cover band, and why most bars don't have live music anymore.

Seriously, if I was a bar owner, this is a good reason why NOT to have a cover band play. The list caters to the 40+ crowd. That's the same crowd who typically if they're going to a bar, either want something fun and unusual (because they don't go to bars very often and are looking for unique experience) or want cheap drinks, a jukebox (or modern equivalent), and a pool table (because they go to the bar very, very often, and probably are more interested in socializing with the other regulars than talking over a loud band). Either way, you'd basically be paying a band to come in and drive away customers.
 

sws1

Member
Messages
10,720
Our setlist philosophy / structure is this:

First set - Songs to introduce yourself and get people to start moving their feet. Crowd tends to be older earlier in the eve, so choice / iconic songs get people in the mood...from 80s and onward. End with some danceable songs. (People are getting buzzed.)

2nd set - First half is clearly dance oriented hits to get those older (now drunk people moving). 2nd half is the peak for the older crowd. They're all moving. Younger crowd starts to arrive and sees that this band is good.

3rd set - Older people have left, and young-uns are in attendance. Modern (90s to today) songs, with the occasional iconic / "song from that list' thrown in to keep the kids moving. e.g., American Girl.
 

Tim Bowen

Member
Messages
3,483
The ever popular "what you have to play in a bar" debates need some qualifiers.

1.) Are you in a dance band or are you not in a dance band
2.) Are you working a room that has a reputation for, and/or a built-in crowd that expects, a specific type of material
3.) What is the average age of your room

There are successful working acts other than dance acts, and there are many different types of rooms and audiences. It's useful to know who you're working for. It should factor into the material that you present. For many scenarios, songs on that 'list' are prime choices. For others, those tunes will run patrons out the door quicker than Wagon Wheel on Auto-Tune.
 

data_null

Member
Messages
509
Great analogy. Usually the cooler-than-thou "musician" types chime in with how The List sucks, play B-sides instead, etc., but anyone who's been out there knows these songs work because they're safe bets. But some are definite head scratchers like the Doors, Doobies, Steppenwolf, etc., unless you're playing to the geriatric crowd.


I'd be interested in your setlist and your numbers using that approach. It can work if you don't care about repeat gigs or you're playing for free or at backyard parties, but in my experience this is how many cover bands start out, then start shifting toward The List when they realize they're clearing the room everywhere they go.
That's pretty much the exact opposite everywhere I've ever lived. The bands sticking to the types of songs in that "list" basically get the bottom of the barrel gigs (e.g. low paying VFW style places, backyard party at a friend's house, free shows during the middle of the day, etc).

There's a ton of great material to choose from outside of that "list" and "b-sides".
 

Funky54

Member
Messages
4,673
That's pretty much the exact opposite everywhere I've ever lived. The bands sticking to the types of songs in that "list" basically get the bottom of the barrel gigs (e.g. low paying VFW style places, backyard party at a friend's house, free shows during the middle of the day, etc).

There's a ton of great material to choose from outside of that "list" and "b-sides".
Everybody is right because are answers reflect our markets. I played in Farm country, bars were clusters in little towns. There was no music scene. There was no large venues. In that context, you aren’t able to play much outside of stuff everyone will relate to. I don’t like this list. Yes I’ve played a third of them, but I always want to do something memorable but different.
 

Paleolith54

Member
Messages
3,101
Right...it doesn't say "this is an awesome setlist" it just says its a list of songs that people in a cover band should know...there IS a difference...
Swing and a miss.

The content isn't the point. It's the idea that random morons who can't even get names or song titles right are laying this list out there and that, even funnier, some people are actually discussing it seriously.
 

data_null

Member
Messages
509
Everybody is right because are answers reflect our markets. I played in Farm country, bars were clusters in little towns. There was no music scene. There was no large venues. In that context, you aren’t able to play much outside of stuff everyone will relate to. I don’t like this list. Yes I’ve played a third of them, but I always want to do something memorable but different.
No doubt. It definitely varies from town to town. Where I live now, you need to be playing hard rock, metal, or country. Nothing else really goes over here.

I wasn't meaning for it to sound like I was saying he was wrong. Just more surprised than anything, because that's the one constant everywhere I've been.
 




Trending Topics

Top