iPad advice for a teaching musician?

archtop

Member
Messages
1,991
I'm about to buy an iPad. I teach guitar for a living. I want to move all of my lesson plans and transcriptions to the iPad in PDF format (presumably). I'm looking for advice on how much storage I need, and app recommendations. I'm generally interested in how other musicians use their iPads. I don't want to spend more than I need to, but don't want to be frustrated either.
 

cosmic_ape

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
6,993
Any iPad will handle as many .pdf files as you need... As for apps, I just got an iPad myself so I haven't even looked into it...
 

rusty

I own a guitar & I'm 3° from Kevin Bacon
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,525
GoodNotes is a cool pdf app...can "write" on your pdf's or change into sheet music mode...free version is all i've used, but it's worth seeing if it does anything for ya!

just from years of iphone/ipad use, get the newest/biggest you can afford. when they update operating software, you'll get more years out of it and less drag/glitch!!!
 

PaulC

Member
Messages
1,906
"Notion" is a great app that's about $17.00. I use it for both of my kids. We score out my son's drum lessons, and he can use it to play along with the beats. Same for my daughter's piano lessons. It can also score tab along with staff.


I've been having a blast with it for about 3 months now.

PaulC
Timmy pedals
 

hairshirt

Member
Messages
19
As a student, I can tell you that I find AnyTune Pro+ to be completely invaluable. The ability to speed up, slow down, pitch shift, and slide back and forth, as well as loop sections over and over has been amazing for me to learn new songs (I've been doing this for about three years now). My instructor was used to the Amazing Slow Downer (as a Berklee student that's what a lot of them use(d)) but a) it's actually the same price, and b) not as intuitive (at least for me). There is a free version as well; it plays audio at a lower bit rate and I believe it might have ads. But it's a good place to start if you don't want to spend the $15 for the app.
 

Steve Hotra

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
9,152
I teach full time and use my IPad all the time.
In additional to GB,
I have the following:
Tuner app
Drum beats +
Ultimate guitar app
Errol singers studio ( vocal training )
Banjo roll T
 

Tmidiman

Member
Messages
4,136
I'm about to buy an iPad. I teach guitar for a living. I want to move all of my lesson plans and transcriptions to the iPad in PDF format (presumably). I'm looking for advice on how much storage I need, and app recommendations. I'm generally interested in how other musicians use their iPads. I don't want to spend more than I need to, but don't want to be frustrated either.
There are some great music instruction apps for the iPad. I don't mean apps that teach you how to play guitar (those do exist), but that help to get greater depth of instruction. They are also great for students and teachers.

Anytune Pro+ - One of the greatest music slowdown tools ever created. Great high quality sound that keeps the pitch while slowing down the music. You can set up looping points and they will stay there when you open the song again. Even better you can send the song, with it's looping points to someone else with that app. AND you can download the audio from YouTube (and another site). For teachers they can slowdown licks for their students.

Notion - The best notation app for the iPad. Can transcribe full scores, including tablature and chords. You can use a keyboard, guitar, or bass on screen interface for inputting notes or just add notes to the staff. You can also playback and print out what you've transcribed.

Guitar Toolkit - A great tool for showing scales and chords on the neck. The intervals or notes can be displayed and the number of scales it displays is quite large. You can see scales staring from different positions or for the entire neck. The only fault is that you can not define the "shape" of those positions. What I mean by that is that I think the old way of showing scales in a four fret block is antiquated and hinders a students vision. They need to make it so you can do things like 3 notes per string or combine fret positions. One of the best offerings with this app is that you can build chords, whether standard your your own and place those chords in a chart. As you touch each chord in the chart they will sound. They will also sound on the fretboard and can be strummed.

Roland's R-Mix Tab - Can be useful. It allows you to remove move elements in a mix based on their frequency. It's hard to describe, but maybe you can look up a YouTube video. While not the most accurate tool it is good for isolating the guitar for study or taking it out to perform in its place.

Adobe Ideas - Now this is a basic drawing program. How can this be used for music study? If you have a picture of an empty fretboard in the first layer you can add another on top of it and add the notes for a scale or chord. You can then go to another layer and add other elements while turning on or off what layers you desire. Think of it as an awesome whiteboard you can use with your students. Again you can print out what you create and even export and/or email the results.

iBooks - Save PDF versions of all your music books, equipment manuals, and other documents you can use for study and teaching.

Newsstand - guitar and music magazines. Get a subscription, or get single issues, but wait for sales. There are sales every few months. Check out Guitar Techniques!

YouTube - This is a great app for looking up music and discussing music elements like performance.

Some of these apps have demos, but I really recommend the first three. You will not be disappointed. As far as what size to get I recommended getting the iPad with the largest capacity you can afford. Really, if you are your you ipad for music, even for instruction I recommend the 128 gig model with wifi and the ability of getting a wireless plan. Even if you don't get a plan right away, it's there when you need it.
 

Daka3

Member
Messages
2,112
There are some great music instruction apps for the iPad. I don't mean apps that teach you how to play guitar (those do exist), but that help to get greater depth of instruction. They are also great for students and teachers.

Anytune Pro+ - One of the greatest music slowdown tools ever created. Great high quality sound that keeps the pitch while slowing down the music. You can set up looping points and they will stay there when you open the song again. Even better you can send the song, with it's looping points to someone else with that app. AND you can download the audio from YouTube (and another site). For teachers they can slowdown licks for their students.

Notion - The best notation app for the iPad. Can transcribe full scores, including tablature and chords. You can use a keyboard, guitar, or bass on screen interface for inputting notes or just add notes to the staff. You can also playback and print out what you've transcribed.

Guitar Toolkit - A great tool for showing scales and chords on the neck. The intervals or notes can be displayed and the number of scales it displays is quite large. You can see scales staring from different positions or for the entire neck. The only fault is that you can not define the "shape" of those positions. What I mean by that is that I think the old way of showing scales in a four fret block is antiquated and hinders a students vision. They need to make it so you can do things like 3 notes per string or combine fret positions. One of the best offerings with this app is that you can build chords, whether standard your your own and place those chords in a chart. As you touch each chord in the chart they will sound. They will also sound on the fretboard and can be strummed.

Roland's R-Mix Tab - Can be useful. It allows you to remove move elements in a mix based on their frequency. It's hard to describe, but maybe you can look up a YouTube video. While not the most accurate tool it is good for isolating the guitar for study or taking it out to perform in its place.

Adobe Ideas - Now this is a basic drawing program. How can this be used for music study? If you have a picture of an empty fretboard in the first layer you can add another on top of it and add the notes for a scale or chord. You can then go to another layer and add other elements while turning on or off what layers you desire. Think of it as an awesome whiteboard you can use with your students. Again you can print out what you create and even export and/or email the results.

iBooks - Save PDF versions of all your music books, equipment manuals, and other documents you can use for study and teaching.

Newsstand - guitar and music magazines. Get a subscription, or get single issues, but wait for sales. There are sales every few months. Check out Guitar Techniques!

YouTube - This is a great app for looking up music and discussing music elements like performance.

Some of these apps have demos, but I really recommend the first three. You will not be disappointed. As far as what size to get I recommended getting the iPad with the largest capacity you can afford. Really, if you are your you ipad for music, even for instruction I recommend the 128 gig model with wifi and the ability of getting a wireless plan. Even if you don't get a plan right away, it's there when you need it.
Awesome reply. Thank you. In Notion, can you tap a rhythm on, say the bass, and have it notated in a score? This would be useful in teaching rhytmic notation, often a tricky task.
 

Tmidiman

Member
Messages
4,136
Awesome reply. Thank you. In Notion, can you tap a rhythm on, say the bass, and have it notated in a score? This would be useful in teaching rhytmic notation, often a tricky task.
You can not use the careen for real time entry. You would have to choose the note and the timing. For real time entry you would need the appropriate midi connection and a midi instrument.

It won't take long to become good at entering the proper timings, since you can immediately play back what you've entered and make corrections.
 

djy8131

Member
Messages
652
In the Notion app, can you touch a fret/string on a picture of a guitar neck in the app and it will display it in guitar tab notation? (I'm looking for an easy way to create tabs) EDIT: Looks like they make an app just for guitar called Progression that does what I am asking for only 4.99. Looks like its a subset of Notion
 
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temple12

Noodler Extraordinaire
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
903
I’m pretty sure Notion is the best one right now for making sheet music. Cubasis works a lot like the normal program, so if you work that way, you might get some use out of that. .pdfs can be read by iBooks, so you’re covered there. You’ll need to just spend the money and buy Pages since you’ll be in and out of documents as a teacher or personally. I also recommend Numbers for spreadsheets (practice plans, budgets or payments tracking). There are other apps that do the latter two things, but I have found those to be easiest and well-integrated into the iOS operating system. Also, consider you’re going to need a good audio input device for your ipad to record or play with sims. There are so many on the market, you can research a bit to figure out what’s right for you.

I also recommend getting the biggest iPad in terms of hard drive space. My audio alone without recording is 30 gigs with just favorites and practice tracks. You’ll run out of space quickly if you do any recording. On the other hand, I had my ipad 2 for YEARS before I finally bit the bullet and upgraded.

Other Apps – I’ve gone through quite a few, but here are the ones with the best utility for me:
Highly recommend Chordbot for practice. It’s like BandInABox with less features. Lots of good chord selections, too.

I also like Anytune Pro a lot for slowing down audio. It’s pricey but really worth it.

Garageband is a great recorder/lite sequencer and worth the price (free plus upgrades in the app, I think), and also comes with a slightly laggy but passable amp sim.

As far as Amp Sims go, I really like Jamup and Bias best. I think they sound more authentic than the rest although Line 6, Amplitube and ReValver all have apps that are perfectly usable with some. All of them are not quite as good as what we get on a PC or Mac.

The big flagship apps for recording are Auria and Cubasis. There are other apps for less but do yourself a favor and shell out for the a major one up front rather than go through a bunch of smaller ones trying to find one if you plan on doing any recording (although I’ve gotten good results with Multitrack before I upgraded). If they are too expensive, use an app like AppShopper to watch your favorite ones. Eventually, they go on sale (I picked up Auria and Cubase at nearly half their normal price at Christmas, but generally have seen sales every couple months).

On the topic of audio recording, make sure you purchase Audioshare if you're going to record. It helps shuffle audio back and forth between apps. Also might want to make the investment in Audiobus. It allows audio apps to communicate back and forth as plug ins and is still more widely supported than Apple’s newly introduced Inter-App Audio. Lastly, I also recommend Filebrowser which is a good way to wirelessly access your network so you can move stuff back and forth from other computers to the Ipad. If you couldn't tell, there are some limitations to apps talking to each other for security reasons in iOS, but you can work it out with the right tools.

Good luck!
 
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archtop

Member
Messages
1,991
Thanks for all the great suggestions. I have a lot to explore. For now, I've bought the 32gb iPad, just because thats as far as i could stretch. Looks like there are a lot of new tools that I can use for teaching that I can get into, which is exactly what I wanted. However, my first priority was to transition all of my existing teaching material over. I've found two great apps for that:

Turboscan by Piksoft
Great for using your iPhone or iPad camera as a scanner to create multi page PDFs. You can straighten and crop and get the file size down. I often transcribe stuff or create lessons on the fly, and sometimes pen and paper is best. This allows me to capture that stuff quickly. It also allows me to capture a version of my books that I no longer want to carry around with me.

ForScore
This is a fantastic librarian for all of your sheet music. I could use iBooks, but this is so much better. Hypothetically (forget the copyright implications), if you import a PDF of the Real Book, you can then go through and bookmark all of the individual songs. You can add as much metadata as you like, which you can then use to search your library. You can Easily email just Autumn Leaves to a student, rather than the whole book. You can mark up or annotate the sheet music, and save different versions. You can create set lists and have the music display in that order for a gig.

This will be great. I generally take students through method books, but also kind of carry a database of songs in my head for different skill levels. For instance, learning to strum in the key of G, I have a go to list of songs that will suit a 10 year old, a teenager, or a 40 year old. In ForScore I can tag every song that suits that task and probably find far more options on the fly than my brain can easily keep track of. The stages and outcomes I try to teach are often the same, but the repertoire can be just about anything.
 

PaulC

Member
Messages
1,906
In the Notion app, can you touch a fret/string on a picture of a guitar neck in the app and it will display it in guitar tab notation? (I'm looking for an easy way to create tabs) EDIT: Looks like they make an app just for guitar called Progression that does what I am asking for only 4.99. Looks like its a subset of Notion

Yes - notion has a built in keyboard and guitar neck to input the notes. It also knows which note on what string, so it will make perfect tabs while also having it staffed out. It will allow you to show fingerings for both hands. When you play back it will show the notes on the staff/tab/and fret board.

It really is a great app.

PaulC
Timmy pedals
 




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