Ironic ... giggles.

wedewer

Member
Messages
2,438
My band members (one I've been in a bands with since 1997) says my sound never changes, I still sound like "Jason" no matter what amp I play. This hurts the ego to hear this, knowing there were times I used $350 worth of gear (plus my guitar) and now I use about $3500 worth of gear each night. Fender, Mesa, Marshall, Vox, and variants/boutique builds of all these and in the end, I sound like "me". But, as a fellow gear geek, we guitarist need to be happy with our sound. [EDIT] I have found myself in a situation where my cheaper gear would actually do a better job or my "off the storeroom floor" amp.... But I find myself thinking "there may be other guitarist there" so I'll take the Dr. Z instead. So sometimes, ego does come in to play here. (and the say singers have big ego's) ;)
One of the more honest posts I have read on TGP
 

Silent Sound

Member
Messages
5,405
Do you know what you call someone who can make any fully functioning guitar or amp sound great? A musician. Do you know what you call someone who needs special equipment to sound good? A hack. A good artist draws inspiration from what's around them. They don't need rely on gear to fill that void. Life itself will keep that cup full.

As the saying goes, tone is in the fingers. Anyone who says differently is selling something.
 

NoBrakes

Member
Messages
2,770
As a musician, great gear inspires me. Mediocre gear, upon hearing and feeling it, does not.

Next?
One of the more honest posts I have read on TGP
Same, I always sound l like me... When we did our cd I swapped a bunch of guitars, reality is I could have used one or two. I use a "tweaked" PV Classic 30 as my main now. It's only "tweaked" because I felt like an electronics project. The only thing wrong with it is that it says Peavey on it and some thumb their nose at it, plays great, sounds good and is all I really need. If it gets stolen or fries I'll spend another $300 for a used one plus $18 for mod parts to duplicate this one, it's good enough for me.
 

bgh

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
6,981
I get the OPs point. But I think most people miss the point
when observing the type of gear being used.

The Amp and Guitar(s) people use as well as the tone they get is
Not for the audience - it's so the musician hears what they want to
hear - which often inspires them to perform better because they
Are comfortable.
...
I think there is actually a lot to this - and I hope that the way that I explain it makes sense.

Each amp designer has a specific way that they go about designing their amps. They choose the layout that they want, the options that they want, and they choose the circuits and power options that they want. No two amp designers are the same (with the exception of someone who is trying to clone a specific amp). For example, Bogner amps are laid out and controlled differently than Mesa amps.

I know that this sounds simplistic, but I think some of the times that we "bond" with one amp as opposed to another is that our way of thinking lines up more with the designer of the amp that we bond with - as opposed to the one designed by someone else. The way our mind approaches amplification lines up with a particular designer, so, all other things being equal, we gravitate toward amps designed by them.

I have had some amps (such as a 1980s Dean Markley I once owned) and pedals (like my Zoom G5) that I was never completely comfortable with. I used them, but never really felt at ease with them. At first I thought it was that maybe I was no good in dialing in an amp (or pedal). But, I realized that there were other amps that I had no trouble dialing in. What I found was that when I played, I tended to be more of a 1-trick pony with the gear I was not fully 'at home' with. My playing was held back to a degree. I was always worried that if I tried to change some setting, I was not going to be sure of how the gear responded and that I would end up way off from where I wanted to be.

When I played through gear that I completely meshed with, things were different. I played with much more confidence that I had with the other gear.

From someone listening to us play, they would walk away thinking that in both cases, we sounded the same. And we probably did. The difference that some people did notice (and told me) was that I seemed to be much more relaxed and at ease at times.

To me, this fits in with what the OP and other posters are saying. When we play through gear that we mesh with, we are comfortable using the gear, and, no matter whether it is boutique, middle of the road, or something else, we always end up sounding like "us".

When we use gear that we are somewhat uncomfortable with, while we may sound the same, we may also lack that confidence that gives our playing the pizazz that we seek.

Hopefully, this made sense.
Thanks for reading.
 

NoBrakes

Member
Messages
2,770
As a musician, great gear inspires me. Mediocre gear, upon hearing and feeling it, does not.

Next?
One of the more honest posts I have read on TGP
Same, I always sound l like me... When we did our cd I swapped a bunch of guitars, reality is I could have used one or two. I use a "tweaked" PV Classic 30 as my main now. It's only "tweaked" because I felt like an electronics project. The only thing wrong with it is that it says Peavey on it and some thumb their nose at it, plays great, sounds good and is all I really need. If it gets stolen or fries I'll spend another $300 for a used one plus $18 for mod parts to duplicate this one, it's good enough for me.
 

JB6464

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
4,158
Do you know what you call someone who can make any fully functioning guitar or amp sound great? A musician. Do you know what you call someone who needs special equipment to sound good? A hack. A good artist draws inspiration from what's around them. They don't need rely on gear to fill that void. Life itself will keep that cup full.

As the saying goes, tone is in the fingers. Anyone who says differently is selling something.
Great , now stacks of Pignose amps will be stacked on stage instead of Marshall amps for AC/DC's next tour. :D
Can't wait to see that trick since tone is in your fingers...

Technique is in the fingers , tone is how you tweak the guitar and amp .
That's my line and i'm sticking to it. :banana
 

CRUE

Member
Messages
830
Great , now stacks of Pignose amps will be stacked on stage instead of Marshall amps for AC/DC's next tour. :D
Can't wait to see that trick since tone is in your fingers...

Technique is in the fingers , tone is how you tweak the guitar and amp .
That's my line and i'm sticking to it. :banana

:facepalm
 

trailrun100s

Member
Messages
3,569
Why is it such a difficult concept for people to see guitars/amps/pedals as tools. Yes, much of your base tone is in your fingers and technique, and your creativity/musicality is in your mind...The equipment is the final filter, and it has an impact on the final product...

And if it gives the artist the sound he/she is looking for, what does it matter the cost, or name on the grill or headstock...
 

MikeDojcsak

Member
Messages
423
I find when playing nicer gear, the musicians in the crowd tend to pay more attention from the start. That being said, I bought my Matchless for myself :)
 

Dale

Member
Messages
10,314
I understand taking pride in one's tools/gear. I have to say, for me, that the inspiration does not really come from it as much as from others. Whether those be the other players, or from the listeners. I also find the music inspiring independent of the gear. So for me the gear certainly does not hurt but it is a much smaller element I guess.
 

Dale

Member
Messages
10,314
W<snip> ...The equipment is the final filter, and it has an impact on the final product...
I am not sure about it being the final filter. I think that is the listeners ears/brain and the impact it has there. The final means of delivery perhaps. I do agree it is no body's business save the player really. It was just encouraging to note that music is, at least from my current stance, not something available to only the more privileged I guess.
 

teemuk

Member
Messages
3,279
Great , now stacks of Pignose amps will be stacked on stage instead of Marshall amps for AC/DC's next tour. :D
Can't wait to see that trick since tone is in your fingers...
A miked Pignose through the PA and a wall of dummy Marshall stacks / heads on stage would fool everyone though. Fits the theme of this thread pretty well.
 

NoBrakes

Member
Messages
2,770
I find when playing nicer gear, the musicians in the crowd tend to pay more attention from the start. That being said, I bought my Matchless for myself :)
I would agree but they are also the ones who generally won't give you one once of credit for anything you do. I never play for musicians if I can help it. Matchless for yourself, good choice&#65533;&#65533;
 
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Tone_Terrific

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
33,963
Let's face it nobody (guitar bass or keys) needs a personal amp at a PA equipped venue. You just need the right interface.
 

vincevega

Member
Messages
25
I feel like many guitarists have a tone in mind and, even when they are going off the deep-end with an amp, say going from an Ampeg V2 rig to a 5153 rig, they will end up at a tonal place that mirrors the aspects of sound they prefer, be it a conscious decision or an unconscious event.
 

Crowder

Dang Twangler
Messages
19,072
I have the budget and the time/energy to source good gear. I have traded through a ton of boutique amps, pedals and guitars over the last five years, but when I listen to recordings of our band from different times and with different gear, I would be hard-pressed to tell you what I was using on a specific recording just from listening. Part of this is that the player is the most important ingredient, and part of it is that each player likes to hear certain kinds of tones and will dial in whatever gear he's using to sound the way he likes to hear gear sound. Many times when I've traded gear, I'm trying to get things that fit together well and fit the amp or guitar I'm favoring. This leads to a lot of tail chasing for sure, as changing one component of my signal chain can lead to changing several more (and sometimes wishing I still had something I sold previously).

Our singer on the other hand doesn't have the budget to trade gear all the time, and he doesn't feel the need. He's played the same guitars and amp since I met him over three years ago, and the only pedals he's changed have been because I loaned him something I thought would improve his tone. His gear is:
- Bone stock Epiphone Dot
- Bone stock Epiphone SST
- Fender Hot Rod DeVille that I modded with Fromel parts (because I wanted to...he didn't ask me to!)
- Pedalboard: Boss tuner, Boss delay, Boss GE-7, Dunlop Wah, Bones AB/Y (mine), Catalinbread DLS (mine), SHO copy (mine)

I've helped him dial in his board and amp some, and he really gets great tones from both the electic and acoustic signal chains. Every once in a while I wonder WTF I am doing when I could get a cheaper pedal platform amp and do it his way and get a set of tones that works just as well in our band setting.

One thing I've realized is that trying, comparing and changing gear is one of the things I enjoy about all my hobbies. I'm a gear guy. I just am. There are times when it causes me more frustration than it seems to be worth. There are certainly times when I am messing around with gear and I should be practicing or writing or making demos. But when those things are a priority for me, that's what I do. There are other times when I'm not inspired to play or write, but I'm chasing a sound or trying out different things. There's nothing wrong with that IMHO.
 
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