Is anyone making a decent Plexiglass/Acrylic Stratocaster these days?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by dealmaker, Apr 12, 2015.

  1. dealmaker

    dealmaker Member

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    Looking to buy or build a Plexiglass/Lucite/Perspex/Acrylic Stratocaster - something similar to Nile Rodgers "Guitarman" model.

    There is some cheap horrible stuff available form China.....but I was looking for either a half decent entire guitar - or a nice body - that I can add a decent neck and hardware to....any ideas???
     
  2. Tidewater Custom Shop

    Tidewater Custom Shop Performance Enhancing Guitarworks Supporting Member

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    Not sure about big-factory production models, but if it's custom you want, Don Bell is your man. Check him out here.

    Affordability is relative. He will make just about anything you want and far better than you'd expect for the money. His website shows the tip of the iceberg - the man is talented. I've been to his shop. I played several of his guitars. I'm not into acryllic guitars, but I own one of his maple cap'd 'hog works. We've had lengthy discussions about his work ethic and production processes. I'd buy one again.
     
  3. gulliver

    gulliver Member

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    ^ Pretty cool stuff ... and the middle of the body is wood, so it probably won't sound like crap. If you ever played a super heavy hard rock maple guitar, you'll know that the note envelope turns to concrete.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Cal Webway

    Cal Webway Member

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    yea avoid the cheap carp.

    Had a MIC plexi gtr 7 yrs ago where the neck pocket and bridge had misalignment issues that were much
    beyond the ol' 'shift the neck in the pocket' alignment trick, and other issues.

    .
     
  5. Chrome Dinette

    Chrome Dinette Silver Supporting Member

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    Electrical will do acrylic bodies, but then you are also in for an aluminum neck, so...
     
  6. archey

    archey Member

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    If you haven't played a plexiglass guitar before, prepare yourself for a boat anchor on your back!
     
  7. gulliver

    gulliver Member

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    Yes ... when they advertise "light", they're talking LED back lighting. :eek:
     
  8. sshan25

    sshan25 Supporting Member

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    Every acrylic guitar l've held has weighed about the same as a Buick. They make most 70's era Les Pauls feel featherweight.
     
  9. NoahL

    NoahL Member

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    This guy has done lots. Nice guy, easy to work with, very passionate. Expert luthier of 30 years and always making his own interesting models. http://chicagoguitarrepair.com
     
  10. serial

    serial Member

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    OK, OK-come on. Lucite guitars are NOT that heavy. Are they lightweights? No-but my original Dan Armstrong guitars and basses are a good bit lighter than most 70s Fenders or LPs that I've owned or own. They also sound great.

    I haven't played any of the cheap ones-no need to, but EVERY single post about these guitars becomes a 'they're the heaviest guitars ever made'... Simply not true, but is 'internet gospel' because enough people who don't know repeat it. I just got rid of a 12.5lb (but great sounding) Strat. All of the lucites weigh the same (of course) and mine are in the upper 9lb range. Really not much more than your average non-chambered Les Paul.
     
  11. stormin1155

    stormin1155 Member

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    I got a cheap one off ebay for the body (Galveston brand??)... swapped out everything else. It played and sounded good but weighed about 15 lbs. The body was nice... everything fit.
    [​IMG]
     
  12. Surfreak

    Surfreak Member

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    Looks aside, why would you want a lucite guitar though? The ones I've tried sounded quite bad to my ears, the plastic body was heavy and the material acted as a vibration dampener - great for tennis rackets I guess...
     
  13. serial

    serial Member

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    The old Dan Armstrongs sound great. I can't comment on anything else. They also get lots of attention at gigs.
    [​IMG]
     
  14. samdjr74

    samdjr74 Supporting Member

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    I like that kind of attention!

     
  15. Buelligan

    Buelligan Member

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    Uh... I like this.
     
  16. LPMojoGL

    LPMojoGL Music Room Superstar Supporting Member

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    Resurrected to say,

    I played some of Don Bell's guitars today. The guy does great work. Not only did I play 3 of his acrylics models, but I also played Rickenbacker and Gibson Les Paul "clones". Fantastic guitars.

    The acrylics really surprised me. They are heavy, but not as heavy as my LP Classic. I really like the Jazzmaster he makes. It's very comfortable to play. The sound of the acrylics vs straight wood is impressive. Acrylics don't darken too much when you roll off the guitar volume. They project more than traditional guitars, have a more prominent low end while remaining tight. It's like playing a hollow body without any of the drawbacks (feedback, mushy low end), but yes, it's heavier. Uses Amalfitano pickups and they sound good.

    Super-friendly guy, Don Bell. I look forward to going back and checking out his guitars, again.
     

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