Is Jerry Cantrell the most definitive Grunge guitarist?

LikeLinus

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795
If there's one thing ol' mate isn't fond of, it's facts.

The idea that I had to have been around during "the scene" to have an opinion on it is ageist, it's also ridiculous.

I didn't need to "actually experience" anything - I've got the internet, I can get way more relevant (and factual!) information than some bias rando's 2c.
You don't need to experience sex because you see it on the internet. I foresee a very lonely life for you, buddy. Now, time to go watch a movie with the wifey and then get some of that experience you don't need. I bid you adieu...
 

Riffi

Courtney DIDN’T Kill Kurt!
Silver Supporting Member
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You don't need to experience sex because you see it on the internet. I foresee a very lonely life for you, buddy. Now, time to go watch a movie with the wifey and then get some of that experience you don't need. I bid you adieu...
Dude @Turi is married and has a child, a daughter iirc.
 

Turi

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11,048
You don't need to experience sex because you see it on the internet. I foresee a very lonely life for you, buddy. Now, time to go watch a movie with the wifey and then get some of that experience you don't need. I bid you adieu...

What in the projection is this?

I feel sorry for you, mate.
 

Astronaut FX

Silver Supporting Member
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8,478
Many are still missing that grunge was not really a genre. It was more of a movement. It wasn’t a sound so much as it was a community.

What that translates into as far as “voice of a generation” or definitive guitarist, I don’t really care as it’s subjective. But yeah, AIC was absolutely part of the grunge scene/community.
 

LikeLinus

Member
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795
Dude @Turi is married and has a child, a daughter iirc.
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You guys have the combined mental capacity of a toddler. Enjoy your night, kids.
 

Gasp100

Silver Supporting Member
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26,252
I edited it before you even replied. The other guy deserved it though for the low blows he was taking at voodoosound for no reason. You can't talk like that to people and then get upset when it comes back at you.
Weird thread. Never knew mid-20’s+was considered “young and cutting edge” by TGP standards lol
 

Frater106

Member
Messages
347
they are completely 100% a pop act. Try and dispute it. GO! I’ll pick this up later after the gym if you haven’t been put down for sleepy Time.
They are a pop act, they ****ing ROCK, and no one with a clue thinks of them as a one-hit wonder. Show me a band with greater sincerity, integrity, or authenticity than Nirvana. There aren’t many like that. Ands that’s saying something given how much great music there was in the ‘90s. What rock music pervaded the 2000s, the 2010s? I don’t even know, but I’ve not seen anything cohesive.
 

Frater106

Member
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347
I do love me some Alice In Chains, though! I’m pretty much a Dirt guy. What post-Layne albums would be most important for me to check out first?
 
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A-Bone

Montonero, MOY, Multitudes
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Is it logical to have an opinion on something you didn’t experience and further be contrary to someone that did actually experience it? I don’t know. Perhaps, that’s a subject for a philosophy class where people ponder their relative importance when they have none.

I'm not sure logic has much to do with opinion, but one thing worth considering in this context is what it means to have "actually experienced" something as opposed to learning about it later. There are certainly subjectivities bound up in the former experiences that are inaccessible to folks in the latter group. However, equally, there's a pervasive fiction bound up in "you had to be there" arguments predicated on the falsehood that having been alive while something was going on means one experienced it. The reality is that we all have comparatively blinkered experiences compared to the complex fullness of the unfolding history that surrounds us.

All that to suggest that there's at least an equal value in those who weren't "there" looking back on history without the same kind of subjective experience and biases. The best historians aren't those who lived though things, nor the best histories inevitably (or mostly) written by those who were "there." Time and distance afford the opportunity to complicate and broaden perspective.

I have personal recollections of when "Smells Like Teen Spirit" broke, as well as the kind of pop cultural and music press discourse around Nirvana and what came to be called grunge--up to and including the "voice of a generation" tag applied to Kurt Cobain. Heck, I was even an early 20s aged, indie music aficionado with many of the same influences and points of comparison as Cobain and co. Grunge (and Nirvana especially) was certainly treated as a big deal in the early 90s, which to an extent set it up to remain a big deal in music history. On the other hand, I was in the San Francisco Bay Area, rather than Seattle (or NYC or LA, etc.).
 
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A-Bone

Montonero, MOY, Multitudes
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108,473
cant I though? To be honest. I can’t say 100% I know what exile on Main Street is. Therefore what significance can it have?

I get that you're being somewhat facetious, but "How famous/important can something be if I'm not intimately familiar with it," is definitely an attitude that shows up often enough on TGP. More than anything, that position reflects the comparatively blinkered, even solipsistic perspective of the poster suggesting it rather than the value of the object being so dismissed/diminished.
 




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