Is my amp hand wired or PCB?

TonePilot

Supporting Member
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Short of pulling the chassis, was wondering if any of you guru's know the answer. Was told it was hand-wired but not sure anymore.

It's a 1965 Fender Deluxe Reverb Re-issue I purchased new in 2016.

fender-65-deluxe-reverb_32342404213_o.jpg
 

John Quinn

Member
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1,128
Short of pulling the chassis, was wondering if any of you guru's know the answer. Was told it was hand-wired but not sure anymore.

It's a 1965 Fender Deluxe Reverb Re-issue I purchased new in 2016.

View attachment 268464

It's PCB - but the question is - do you not like the sound? If you don't - go try out a handwired DR and see if there is any audible difference. I bet there isn't - but confirmation bias will tell you there is.

I've never seen a purple paisley DR before - that looks nice. I also see you are bridging the channels - what is that doing for you?
 

Rc7321

Member
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200
I know, there's something special about the human touch when it comes to amp building. And pedal building too.
Oh without question the human factor matter. Same with old vacuum tubes, old Gibson's/Marshalls/Fenders. You can have 10 60's Marshalls in a room and each sound different. The neck carve on an original 1959' Gibson Les Paul or old Stratocaster can vary depending on who came into work that day.
Another thing to consider is the supply chains of electronic components and parts 30/40/50+ years ago.
Artisan's like Mike Bendinelli @ Mesa/Boogie are responsible for wiring up some of the best circuits on the planet. When they step down you hope someone else can even come close.
 

gulliver

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9,314
If you poke around on google image search, you should be able to find a gut shot of that amp or something very similar.
 

TonePilot

Supporting Member
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3,939
It's PCB - but the question is - do you not like the sound? If you don't - go try out a handwired DR and see if there is any audible difference. I bet there isn't - but confirmation bias will tell you there is.

I've never seen a purple paisley DR before - that looks nice. I also see you are bridging the channels - what is that doing for you?
I like it a lot. Was just curious. The finish is painted on with a gloss coating. Seems pretty durable. The channel bridging allows me to use the main channel which for some reason I prefer and jump into the -6dB input for some reverb. I don't do this anymore as I get good enough reverb off my board. It also give you four EQ knobs which might open up some tone options for some folks.
 

Todd1357

Member
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128
Most agree that amps using PCB or Handwired construction will both sound the same if all things are equal. I have both PCB and handwired amps, both are reliable and sound great.

There is an unquestionable advantage to handwired construction, and that is ease of repairs and modifications, and it's fine to prefer it for that reason.
 

TonePilot

Supporting Member
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3,939
Most agree that amps using PCB or Handwired construction will both sound the same if all things are equal. I have both PCB and handwired amps, both are reliable and sound great.

There is an unquestionable advantage to handwired construction, and that is ease of repairs and modifications, and it's fine to prefer it for that reason.
That's exactly what this video says (ease of repairs) but they did say they also preferred the sound of the hand-wired version. At the end, it seemed that the main sound advantage of the hand-wired version had more to do with the speaker.

 
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Todd1357

Member
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128
That's exactly what this video says (ease of repairs) but they did say they also preferred the sound of the hand-wired version. At the end, it seemed that the main sound advantage of the hand-wired version had more to do with the speaker.

They shouldn't sound different if the components and speaker are the same, so it must have been the speaker. I have a twin reverb reissue I bought new in 2006 that's never had any issues except power tube replacement. Fender reissues are rock solid in my experience.
 

TonePilot

Supporting Member
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3,939
They shouldn't sound different if the components and speaker are the same, so it must have been the speaker. I have a twin reverb reissue I bought new in 2006 that's never had any issues except power tube replacement. Fender reissues are rock solid in my experience.
Components were a bit different.
 




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