Is Randy Rhoads overpraised?

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by WildRanger, Jun 20, 2019.

Is Randy Rhoads overpraised?

  1. Yes

    20.0%
  2. No

    72.0%
  3. Unsure

    8.0%
  1. Bogner

    Bogner Member

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    You don't have enough posts here on TGP to troll in such a manner. :facepalm
     
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  2. Hammered

    Hammered Supporting Member

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    Except for the dislike of his tone I never hear him getting bashed , if anything it’s nothing but praise
     
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  3. Yer Blues

    Yer Blues Member

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    Pretty funny on a guitar forum the question would be asked "is Randy Rhoads overpraised". :idea:

    Well um this is a music/guitar forum. I don't think you'd hear him mentioned on a classic car or baking forum. :confused:
     
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  4. Slash

    Slash Supporting Member

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    I think his untimely death helped his fame skyrocket but I believe he was innovative and a unique player for the time. Now I have to admit I'm bias because my first concert was Ozzy a few months before the crash. Watching him live was very impressive for a new concert goer. He was also my strongest influence in picking up the guitar. Most people outside of guitarist probably don't even know who he is. What instrument do the majority of people here play?
     
  5. Tomo El Gato

    Tomo El Gato Member

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    I guess you don't know many musicians. You said the same thing about Van Halen.
     
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  6. sahhas

    sahhas Supporting Member

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    I don't think so.
    i think his playing was great, and I loved everything about his work with Ozzy.
    I just think he was a unique player that came about at just the right time.
    It's sad that he's gone.
    it's funny in all the stuff i've read about him, and listening to his music with Ozzy:
    this:

    was one of the first times I heard his voice, it sounds so weird, and so disconnected from my memories of him....I guess there is also the banter on Dee outtakes from Tribute...actually not long ago I got the Tribute album on CD, wow what a great album!
     
  7. ScratchyPot

    ScratchyPot Member

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    LOL, cool trool, bro! Ignorant as hell, but 10/10 on the troll scale.
     
  8. Hot In The Shade

    Hot In The Shade Member

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    I don't follow you.
     
  9. shredtrash

    shredtrash Supporting Member

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    No. He deserves all of the accolades he's received. Just listen to his recordings and live playing. He's brilliant and he was on the ground floor of a groundbreaking style of playing.

    Also, I don't understand the criticism of his tone either. I actually think it's perfect for his style of playing. There's an edge to it that's very distinctive. I've never heard anyone else sound quite like him.
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2019
  10. 1967SG

    1967SG Member

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    How many guitar forums are left - 4?
     
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  11. viper

    viper Member

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    You need to put it in context of the times. In a world where VH was "it" around 1981, especially as far as the general music listening public was concerned, Rhoads was a breath of fresh air. Sure, you had players out there with some killer styles but most of those guys were European (Roth, Blackmore, Schenker) but the newer American cats were either featuring pentatonic licks on hyperdrive (think Nugent or Marino) or that PLUS tricks in the bag (EVH). Hard to say he's overpraised as he's a major influence on a lot of players that came after him.

    Re: Mr Crowley... I'd read somewhere that he'd work out solos in advance but couldn't think of what to play for this one. Ozzy said something like "just play from your heart" and... well, the rest is history. Not the exact quote but something along those lines. Pretty damn good for something off the top of his head.
     
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  12. Yam the BOMB

    Yam the BOMB Silver Supporting Member

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    He was actually on two studio albums with Quiet Riot also but the songwriting was so horrible on those that you couldn't get a great impression of his early talent. He had a few little leads that showed promise but nothing like he did later with Ozzy.

    On this song (Trouble) he definitely showed signs of how good he was. It was on the 2nd album. His licks and lead are really good. The song itself...not so good.

     
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  13. A-Bone

    A-Bone Montonero, MOY, Multitudes Gold Supporting Member

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    I enjoy this clip:

     
  14. tymj2112

    tymj2112 Member

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    To anyone who voted "Yes - he is overpraised" -- How old were you in 1980-82? Were you even born yet?

    If not, there's no way to understand the impact Randy Rhoads had on those of us who were there. I was 14-16 at that time, coincidentally exactly when I got my first guitar -- The first album was simply stunning, but I clearly remember the first song that my friends and I heard from the Diary album was "Over the Mountain." We listened to it and dissected it for hours trying to figure out what he was doing there - that solo was mystifying to a bunch of 15 year old guitar heads.
     
  15. cratz2

    cratz2 Member

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    He was definitely my biggest metal inspiration, coming from a classical background myself.

    I think Diary of A Madman is my favorite of his overall. Those chord changes are amazing.

    The outro solo from Revelation Mother Earth is my favorite of his lead work. It's basically perfect in my opinion. Great start. Great build. AWESOME!
     
  16. Silent Sound

    Silent Sound Member

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    That's kind of what I'm thinking. Though I do hear his name pop up occasionally as a good guitar player, I don't think he's ever been all that highly regarded, except among classic metal fans. Even most guitar players I know will say he's good, but none call him revolutionary nor inspiring, and certainly not one of the all-time greats.

    This sounds like the case of the OP getting a skewed perspective due to the crowd he hangs around.
     
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  17. waggclan

    waggclan Par 4 Holer Gold Supporting Member

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  18. Astronaut FX

    Astronaut FX Member

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  19. Ingvay

    Ingvay Member

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    I guess it depends on one's definition of overpraised. And, also, who cares?

    But, I know, the OP was really just putting forward a top ic for discussion. And it worked!

    I'm old enough to remember when Randy came on the scene, and I really liked the freshness of his style. That was his main contribution, IMO. He seemed almost magical and mythological back in those days, but so did a lot of other guitarists.

    As far as really being a great musician in the larger scheme of things, sure, he's probably not that great. But so few rock guitarists are. That's not really what being a rock guitarist is all about. Any moderate guitarist willing to work at it could get his style and catalogue down after a couple of years I'd wager. It's the inventiveness and fun of coming up with that style and those compositions in the first place that I enjoy so much with a lot of these guitar players.
     
  20. Robert Libutti

    Robert Libutti Member

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    I don't know if this is the OP's case, but I experience this a lot when coming into things a long time after they were new. I didn't hear a lot of Randy until I got into Black Sabbath around 1998 (I remember the year because it was the summer after my senior year in HS). Then looked at recent Ozzy, then older Ozzy. So I'd heard a decade plus of people influenced by Randy before I'd heard Randy. So it wasn't that ground breaking to me. But if you heard Randy when he was new to the scene, I bet it was 'shocking.' I think the same with something like Silence of the Lambs. I was like...8 or 9 when that came out, so I never saw it. I heard about it, but never saw it; how shocking it was, etc. I finally got around to renting it when I was like 31 (it just goes off your radar over time). And it was good, but with 20 years of SOTL inspired movies, it seemed almost dull. But at the time, I bet it was intense.
     
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