Is there a doubler/tripler/quadrupler+ pedal?

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by Lution, Mar 1, 2006.


  1. Lution

    Lution Member

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    I'm looking for a pedal that makes your one guitar sound like more than one, two, or even 5 or more guitars are playing...

    Sort of how slapback makes you sound like two guitars, but more.. perhaps a pedal which samples your signal in real time and adds certain nuances, harmonics, doublings as you play to make it sound huge like a big multi-tracked layered sound.

    just curious. :D
     
  2. cbpickin

    cbpickin Tweed Supporting Member Silver Supporting Member

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    I used to have the now discontinued Boss Harmonist pedal, but I sold it a few months ago on ebay. You can harmonize 1 or 2 notes with the note that you are playing. It was fun to record ideas with. It was like instant Eagles or Allman Bros. leads with one pass. They go for about $125 used.
     
  3. threm

    threm Member

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  4. Lution

    Lution Member

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    I'm thinking more of a pedal that stays in the same octave.
     
  5. BmoreTele

    BmoreTele Member

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    You could split your signal and then run each separate signal through a different chorus pedal set slightly differently.
     
  6. StompBoxBlues

    StompBoxBlues Member

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    I think a pedal like that would have to play a littel with both pitch (just ever so slightly) and tone (also...nuanced)...possibly also "random" delay within a framework.

    I haven't heard of a pedal that does this yet, but a harmonizer can get closer.

    Mainly you sound like you want xactly what happens when you record the same guitar part 4-5, 8, 10 times. When it is the same person and they are playing something they can REALLY play consistently, I think it is mainly the three things above I mentioned. Plus that if you use say the first recorded guitar, I have treid recording several after but use the first one as the "play along with" guide (otherwise you go further and further out of timing, and it turns to mud) but even then sometimes the current track guitar gets a little behind, then a little (very slight) in front of, etc. Also some frequencies then converge and some fight each other.

    It's a cool idea, seems like it would only have a chance to be done digitally. Even then...it has to happen so fast, there can't be a lot of processing.
     
  7. bluesdoc

    bluesdoc Gold Supporting Member Gold Supporting Member

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    I believe the 'detune' function that several processors use does that, more or less.

    jon
     
  8. JamonGrande

    JamonGrande Supporting Member

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    To agree with Stompbox, I would think a flexible rack unit would get you closest, something where the signal is divided into parallel paths, processed individually, and then maybe summed to stereo (mono wouldn't be as impressive). Some of the older Digitech units like the 2112 and Studio Quad are capable of this, as well as the nicer but pricier TC G-Force and Eventide products. Maybe split the signal into 4 paths with each path pitch shifting a cent or two, followed by a wet-only delay to seperate them out by about 4-10ms (with the time varied by an LFO), and then I think a crucial part would be an EQ or other tone modifier to make it sound like different types of guitars.

    To sound truly realistic, you would need to do the above but run each path out to a seperate amp which would fufill the varying tone qualities mentioned above.

    A chorus effect was initially designed to do many of the things listed above: vary the pitch and delay the time slightly to simulate many guitars. But of course it doesn't quite get the sound you want. I think the rub is that multiple guitarists or recorded takes also bring varieties of string attacks, playing styles, tones, and spatializiations. The great sound of multiple guitars is the result of not playing perfectly together.

    I always feel like when I hear electronically harmonized parts, one trakc panned hard left and right with delay, chorusing, etc.., its still sounds like one guitarist, not some guitar army ala Brian May or Jimmy Page. If there is another technique to achieving this sound, I can't think of it.

    joe
     
  9. Lution

    Lution Member

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    haha "Guitar Army" would be a perfect name for it.

    I wish there was a pedal that did all that. Basically Stompboxblues has the right idea for what I'm looking for. Something that sounded like multi-tracked guitar tracks when you play live.
     
  10. vinni

    vinni Member

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    Be creative....

    Plug your guitar in one of these.....who knows.....

    [​IMG]

    Vinni
     
  11. mockoman

    mockoman Member

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    Wasn't there a Rockman pedal that was supposed to do that? By Tom Scholz,the 'Boston' guitar player?
     
  12. tocs100

    tocs100 Member

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    Nope, not Rockman. I have the stereo delay/chorus, but it, like all "doublers"--even hi-fi analog like it is--has its limits. The ONE EXCEPTION I saw was by TC Electronics (I'm pretty sure) which shortened the delay the faster you picked. I always wanted one of those: slow chords would be thick, fast chords would be tight--without tiresome pitch warbling.
     
  13. Big Bob

    Big Bob Guest

    I don't think there is a pedal or rack that can do what you ask. That said I had an ADA Stereo Tapped Delay that was really cool for going in that direction. Six delay lines with regeneration, assignable left or right panning options, modulation and a LFO for the modulation circuit. Analog. It was a very guitar friendly rack unit.

    One of those running into a MURF would probably rule.:D
    Bob
     
  14. threm

    threm Member

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    "Doubling is usually done by making a copy of one track, panning those two identical tracks hard left and hard right, and adding a slight delay(10-30ms) to one of those tracks. The delay between the two tracks creates the stereo image.You can achieve this slight delay in two different ways in your own recordings.
    Either you use a plug in that will provide an actual delay, or you "nudge"(move) one of the audio tracks by a user-determined amount of time(not all software can do this) relative to the original one. Moving one of the tracks will create the time delay, and thus the stereo image.
    Personally I prefer the latter method since it doesn't require any extra processing power like plug ins do.
    Another approach to getting a big/wide stereo sound is simply recording the exact same piece twice, onto two seperate tracks, one panned left, the other to the right. Overall I prefer this method, but it does require some very consistent playing in order to get a good result."

    Doubled guitar
    http://gearslutz.com/board/showthread.php3?t=5204&highlight=guitar+doubling

    Get a Headrush. Run the four individual delay outputs to four amps.
    Add a picher pedal for some small changes in pitch for each ouout.

    But, you always have a problem with this `fake` doubling;
    Despite small changes in timing and pitch in the end it`s the same track, the same guitar and guitarplayer, just mulitplied with some changes.

    To get a more true doubling you would have to use a program that have som random factors (like the feel function on some drum machines)integrated; natural random changes in timing and dynamics.

    One day, thoug, not far away there will be a Variax type modeller guitar with a firewire out that you can plug straight to your laptop running this advanced randomly doubling programs and then go straight to amp or PA.

    Or you could just hire a few more guitarplayers............. or use a looper.
     
  15. DocGonzo

    DocGonzo Member

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  16. Boogie92801

    Boogie92801 Member

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    I had a Boss VF-1 that I used to run in stereo. I could use the harmonizer and send a root and a 5th to one amp and a 3rd and a 7th to the other side.

    This was one of the coolest sounds.

    I miss that.
     

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