Is there a way to test patch cables for solid connections?

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by meterman, Jul 28, 2008.

  1. meterman

    meterman Member

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    I recently put together some soldered patch cables for my pedalboard and a few of them sound dead and dull compared to the rest, though they do pass signal (just not all of it apparently).

    Besides good old trial and error is there a good way to test them like with a multimeter or something? Not just for continuity, b/c these problem patches still pass signal, but something to measure the strength/quality of the connection...

    thanks!
     
  2. V846

    V846 Member

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    yup use a multimeter and measure the resistance meterman
     
  3. nibus

    nibus Supporting Member

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    what connectors are you using?
     
  4. Old Fuzzface

    Old Fuzzface Member

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    Measuring the DC resistance with a multi-meter is all you can do without specialised kit.

    The simplest test to do at home is to feed some audio through your new cable - make up some connections and use a CD or MP3 player to provide a full frequency range signal and have a listen. Compare with a reference cable.

    If you're confident in your soldering abilities and the assembled cables aren't consistent you might want to source some better quality cable.
     
  5. StompBoxBlues

    StompBoxBlues Member

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    This doesn't fill your need to test more of the change to signal (you need to measure cunductance, but also capacitance, etc. and also might be desirable to pass a signal through, looking at on a scope...but besides that...) so I am really just recommending something useful but that doesn't do exactly what you want.

    ALL guitarists really ought to pick up the Behringer (or better, but the Behringer is inexpensive and works great for almost ALL types of cables) cable tester. The reason is it tests all continuity, but also you can stress test cables, but wrangling them around, to see if there are intermittent shorts or opens...this is extremely useful...we all have had the occasional cable that works okay in one position, touch it and suddenly noise, or loss of signal. For cables that would have ohmed out okay not being stressed.

    Also, it even has a small signal generator which can be used too...
     
  6. meterman

    meterman Member

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    Cool, thanks for the tips. Cable and jack quality is excellent, Lava mini ELC with the high quality G&H right angle jacks he uses. 12 of the 16 I made work great so I have no doubt it's my soldering abilities! But I was just hoping for a simple way to test the quality of the signal without having to tear the board apart to find bad ones. Tried the multimeter which didn't tell me much (unless I was using it wrong, entirely possible) b/c the cables aren't shorted so there was continuity and no resistance. But sonically it's obvious something's not right. Just gonna redo them at this point....
     

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