Is there such a thing as a blank input jack cover plate? (Modded Strat)

Fitzer

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,116
I'm wondering why you did that. My solution for the three-hole, two knob problem was to install a switch that engaged the neck pickup, so I can have b+n or all three in addition to the usual combinations.
Fewer knobs and switches, the better. I like having it stripped down. The Telecaster is great in that way but I don’t like Telecasters unfortunately.
It's as though you've dug a hole, then dug another twice as deep in order to have something to shovel into the first one.

But in fairness you've stated that one of your objectives was to be different, so fair play.

How about using the jack plate to stencil the shape onto a thin wood veneer, cut that with a hacksaw, smooth the edges, perhaps paint it, drill two screw holes for fitting and attach?
Everything is 100% reversible. I haven’t dug any holes I can’t dig myself out of and while it all looks like a hack job on the outside, the guts are extremely clean and beautifully wired. This guitar is like a barn find Chevelle with a perfectly rebuild drivetrain underneath all the exterior garbage.

I really like the wood idea. Would be cool to find a crappy piece of scrap wood with a cool beat up look to it. I have an old junk tube radio I could possibly hack up since it’s too far gone for a restoration.
 

Fitzer

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,116
Maybe talk to these guys. Maybe they can make one without the hole.
Holy cow. $50 a piece. Thanks but no thanks—that price is insane
 

Tony Done

Member
Messages
6,420
For stripped down and a natural "relic" look, I would be considering using the existing socket, which IMO is stronger and functionally superior to a pickguard type, and just leaving an empty hole in the pickguard. In fact, the way I play, I would move the two knobs to the lower holes and leave the top one empty.
 
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Hulakatt

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
13,715
Make one.
By far the easiest and cheapest solution.

Thought about it but don’t have any of the right tools and it would be too expensive.
What tools do you have? The only tool you would "need" specifically would be a drill and some bits for the mounting holes. You really could use a piece of metal almost any shape, as long as it fits on the guitar and covers the hole. An angle grinder with a cutting wheel would be ideal for shaping but you could use a hacksaw or any metal cutting blade to shape the overall plate and some files to de-burr the edges. You could some scrap metal 9old toolboxes are great!), use an aluminum pickguard or buy a small plate of metal, available in various sizes and thicknesses at HD or Lowes or most other tool or home improvement stores.
 

Blanket Jackson

Every day is like Tio's birthday
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
15,878
Put GraphTech piezo saddles on the bridge and use the 3rd pot to blend in the piezo sounds. Upside: You will also have an "acoustic guitar" signal with piezo only being output.
 

Silent Sound

Member
Messages
5,123
If you want a custom made piece, which is what this is going to have to be, you're either going to have to make it yourself, or pony up the dough to have a one-off made for you. The mistake you unleashed on your guitar isn't the kind of thing that enough people do to create a market for a mass produced part.
 

Hulakatt

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
13,715
You could make this out of almost anything with just a few simple hand tools. What tools do you have? What materials do you have or would you like to make this out of?

It's that, pony up the cash to have someone else fab one up or deal with the stock jack plate or an empty hole.
 

Howzaboppin

Member
Messages
684
I would visit the thrift shop & look for some inexpensive plastic or wooden tchotchke in a color that you like, with a flat section that you can cut to size. An old Tupperware, or a box of some sort, or some toy. Or just look in your attic.
 

scott

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
4,887
just leave it the way it is, it looks fine. don't make it harder than it has to be
 

fuzz guy

Member
Messages
682
Lots of good suggestions, and yes, as someone alluded to above, that's an output jack on your guitar.
 

tomdav

Member
Messages
1
By far the easiest and cheapest solution.



What tools do you have? The only tool you would "need" specifically would be a drill and some bits for the mounting holes. You really could use a piece of metal almost any shape, as long as it fits on the guitar and covers the hole. An angle grinder with a cutting wheel would be ideal for shaping but you could use a hacksaw or any metal cutting blade to shape the overall plate and some files to de-burr the edges. You could some scrap metal 9old toolboxes are great!), use an aluminum pickguard or buy a small plate of metal, available in various sizes and thicknesses at HD or Lowes or most other tool or home improvement stores.
Definitely, At Lowe's, you can lease similar business-grade instruments and gear numerous experts decide to purchase, without the significant expense related to buying new. Furthermore, with a rental, you don't need to stress over upkeep or capacity. Apparatus and hardware rentals are on a "the early bird gets the worm" premise, so there are no bookings ahead of time accessible. You can't finish a home improvement project without the correct apparatuses for the work.
 

Nebakanezer

Member
Messages
3,308
Go to a machine/metal fabrication shop.
It helps to know what beer they drink and just show up with a 6-pack and remember that a $60 hour rate breaks down to a dollar a minute, so don’t forget that someone’s on the clock.....
I remember seeing someone use a Tupperware or cool whip lid to cut out a plate back in the day.
 

Ron Thorn

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
2,573
Maybe talk to these guys. Maybe they can make one without the hole.
And then put the old pot and knob on it, really blow some minds.
 

Eireguitar

Member
Messages
211
Here's another crackpot idea: Fill the recessed part in the metal with a pool of solder. It would be simple enough to get flat by heating it, or you could just file it to smooth it out.
 

Jayyj

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
8,299
I think the easiest thing would be DIY - thinnish aluminium is easy to cut and drill with the right blade/bit and polishes up nicely.

If you didn't want to do it yourself it can't be more than an hour's work for anyone with the right tools, shouldn't be expensive.
 




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