Is this speaker ok to use?

Scumback Speakers

Platinum Supporting Member
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10,866
@greengriff looks like you have a cone separating from age. My suggestion would be to use white Elmer's glue, applied with a 1" brush (Home Depot, hardware store usually carry these) in a thin layer first to the torn area, including the area near the gasket. Let that dry for a few hours, then apply another layer to even it out with the other doping.

It's not going to last forever, but if you do this now, it could last you a few years longer.
 

J M Fahey

Member
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2,399
Sorry didn´t find this earlier.

Standard speaker edge doping material is same as household "roof/tile leak sealant", only quite thicker.
But you can apply it as is, let dry, apply another coat, etc.
Who cares if it takes 4 or 5 nights to apply?

I am talking the whitish water based "Acrilyc/latex" sealer, which you apply with a large squeegee so it gets inside the leaking crack and blocks it.

Looks white bluish when applied to black paper cone, dries absolutely transparent and cone looks shiny deep black.

The advantage is that it never ever dries, if you pull a Celestion from its packing box after 5 years it´s still sticky like new.

Diluted white glue, contact cement, etc, all dry , and eventually crack (even if in a year or two).

I buy it by the 10 liter can, but in emergencies, or when helping a far away customer, Home Depot grade roof sealant saves the day, just apply more of it, drying in between.

FWIW this is how it ends up:

. Celestion Greenback on left, Fahey 12A80 at right

 

greengriff

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J M Fahey

Member
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2,399
I use Argentine products, but will suggest similar ones available un USA, plus a mini application course he he.
The first ones you suggest are either a coloured paste, or have fibers or are flammable solvent based; the one I suggest is "as liquid as water", water based, roller or brush applied on walls,and with a squeegee on roofs.
It must NOT create a surface layer but be absorbed inside cracks and pores.
In fact it has to be cleaned away from exposed surfaces because it is always sticky tacky and catches dust, grime, bird feathers, whatever.
After application it must be wiped clean with a wet cloth, if allowed to dry you need paint thinner ... it IS speaker edge dope ;)
I found this US brand and model, but you get any other equivalent , just ask your friendly paintshop assistant.
I can NOT get into Home Depot, system rejects my IP address.
This Sherwin Williams one is perfect, only being the PRO version is sold by 5 gallon minimum, but similar ones come in less than 1 liter bottles or cans. And it´s *inexpensive*.
This is the application video for the Argentine brand I use, if a sales assistant sees it (in case he had any doubt) he will instantly recognize it, application starts at 1:34
I´ll upload a couple pictures, one applying a second coat to one of my 10" Guitar speakers, the other to one of my 15" keyboard ones, cone is virgin, this is the first application.
Cone has some kind of treatment (factory applied) , its somewhat bright, and sealant/dope has some difficulty, does not wet surface well, but in 15 minutes when it thickens up something I´ll even it out.
 

greengriff

Member
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176
Just another option for people in the UK: I asked Dr D at Celestion at the same time that I started this thread and he came back with this:
Glues Direct
It's actually cheaper than the roofing product. And he also suggested PVA (wood glue) diluted with a little water if I didn't want to buy a litre of that stuff.
 

J M Fahey

Member
Messages
2,399
The Glues Direct stuff is the real thing and same as roofing sealant, only thicker.

Quite surprised at Dr D´s suggestion because Celestion itself never ever uses diluted PVA (which quickly dries, forms a whitish harder surface skin and has NO tacking whatsoever) as speaker doping but the Acrylic emulsion which does the exact opposite.

May work, sort of, but it´s a kludge.

EASY to check: brush diluted PVA on a cone edge (or even a piece of cardboard) , wait 1 hour and touch it:ZERO tacking.
Now pull a speaker from its packing carton, even if manufactured 5 years ago, real tacky and paper will still strongly adhere to it, exactly what happened to OP´s speaker.

Completely different material and behaviour.
 

edgewound

Member
Messages
5,679
Don't use Elmer's Glue. It's way too stiff and will adversely affect the cone suspension's compliance
Just another option for people in the UK: I asked Dr D at Celestion at the same time that I started this thread and he came back with this:
Glues Direct
It's actually cheaper than the roofing product. And he also suggested PVA (wood glue) diluted with a little water if I didn't want to buy a litre of that stuff.
Just to be clear...PVA comes in different formulations and flexibilities. Elmer's white glue is not what you'd want to use on a speaker surround, unless you want the make the surround non-compliant...which is what you don't want. Wood glue is aliphatic resin...also not for surrounds. Also...different formulations of PVA are not all "sticky" when dry.

Looks like the Glues Direct is a winner. You can also thin down contact cement to a thin consistency and paint it on. Make sure whatever you use is the same base as either solvent or water base...otherwise, it'll make a mess.

PS...Aileen's or 3M tacky glue for water base is also a candidate. Craft stores carry it. Remains flexible.
 
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