ISO Cab that won't bleed into drum mics?

Discussion in 'Recording/Live Sound' started by hendrixstrat, Feb 8, 2012.

  1. hendrixstrat

    hendrixstrat Member

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    I have a very small room (12x16) that I'm getting a great drum sound in..I have the drums all mic'd up, and 2 condensors overhead..I need something that I can run my head into that won't bleed into the overheads..Is there such an Iso cab that is completely silent?
     
  2. swicker

    swicker Member

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    id say there is no cab that is completely silent... unless you build it super thick like an iso cab in an iso cab in and iso cab...

    i love my rivera silent sister...but not 100 percent silent...
     
  3. SteveO

    SteveO Member

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    The Demeter iso cab isn't completely silent, either. Putting them in another room is one solution.
     
  4. hendrixstrat

    hendrixstrat Member

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    Yeah, I might end up running a speaker and mic cable from the basement into the recording room..That Rivera cab sounds great..I just watched a shootout on youtube with the guy with the Van Halen guitar..$1000.00 for a cab isn't really on my short list at the moment though..I saw the Randall ISO12C for around $400.00..Any reviews on that?

     
  5. swicker

    swicker Member

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    ha! i am the guy that made the rivera / demeter iso cab shootout vid...i definately prefer the rivera, but the demeter is still a very nice cab... the rivera just sounds better to my ears...i think because of that porting theyve done to it... air can still escape and enter.. the demeter is just a box with no breathing

    i hear ya $1000 aint cheap!
     
  6. johnfv

    johnfv Member

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  7. hendrixstrat

    hendrixstrat Member

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    That was a great demo bro! Really sold me on the Rivera..Like I said, cash is a problem at the moment, so the Rivera will unfortunatly have to wait..Thanks everyone else for your opinions as well..Still checking out the alternatives..
     
  8. SteveO

    SteveO Member

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    Another option would be a route similar to the one I took: The Demeter was noisy enough that it wasn't quite apartment-friendly, so I had to try again. I went with a Radial JDX amp DI (which has a speaker emulator that is really pretty decent), and from there into a Hot Plate for a load box. Absolutely silent recording, even with the amp (Mesa Mark V) master around 11:00, which would otherwise be LOUD.

    In fact, I was happy enough with the results from the JDX that I usually record that way still, even though I moved into a house two years ago and have the ability to crank things up a bit.
     
  9. rokpunk

    rokpunk Member

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    how about a super low wattage amp covered with a sound blanket or something? carr makes an amp that goes down to 1/16th of a watt.
     
  10. Papajuice

    Papajuice Silver Supporting Member

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    You could build something like this, it is a sheet of 3/4 pine plywood and some 1x2 strips. I made 4, 18x36 cuts and a 18x18 top and bottom. I made a set of 1x2 strips and put them around 20 inches up and mounted a 1/4 piece of plywood for the speaker. I lined it with 2 inch foam all the way around and on the bottom. I also put foam on the top lid and and foam 1/2 inch around the lid opening. We use it for youth stuff where we have to keep volume low works great and I have $125 in it not counting the speaker.
     
  11. phazersonstun

    phazersonstun Member

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    I built one my self for very little cash that ended up sounding very good.
    I used an Oktava MC-012 inside.
    Used it for a few years until it got water damaged.

    It just may be time to build again.
     
  12. MartinCliffe

    MartinCliffe Member

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    I built two iso boxes in my studio... they're pretty big (4'6 deep x 4' wide x 2'6 high) made of multi-layer laminate material (MDF, timber, insulation polystyrene, etc) and with quite a bit of acoustic foam inside. The doors are held on with magnetic catches and sealed with neoprene strip. I can put any standard sized 1x12 or 2x12 cab in there - I've got a speaker line and 3 balanced mic lines running into each. Wasn't expensive to build (couple of hundred for both as a generous guess) but they sound much better than off-the-shelf iso cabs. I usually run a Rode NT1A condenser mic and a SE Electronics R1 ribbon mic in each on my cabs. Wouldn't want to have to move 'em though (even if they weren't attached to the walls)!
     
  13. LSchefman

    LSchefman Member

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    I've been in some studios where they've done this, and it definitely is a very good idea on a lot of levels. Gives the recordist a lot of flexibility.

    Takes up a bit of space, but it's a good idea.

    Here's another alternative that might be less immediately attractive, but will work:

    Record the guitar with a direct box using software (or whatever floats your boat as a scratch track, as long as the untreated guitar signal is preserved), and play live with the drums and the rest of the band. No, it won't be your favorite amp, but it's only temporary.

    Then re-amp the recorded guitar signal after you've got the drums recorded, and mic up the amp of your choice. There'll be no bleed into the drums, and lots of opportunity to experiment with guitar sounds at your convenience.

    And/or you could still overdub the guitars if the re-amping isn't cutting it for the track. There are plenty of inexpensive re-amping devices on the market in the $100 range.
     

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