It could be just me

Discussion in 'Acoustic Instruments' started by exhaust_49, Sep 14, 2006.

  1. exhaust_49

    exhaust_49 Member

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    I notice when I pick my acoustic up it's almost like the top of the guitar has to vibrate a bit and warm up while I'm warming up. It takes my guitar a good 5 min. of playing to sound a bit warmer and deeper.

    Has anyone else experienced this? It could be my ears but that's what I hear.

    And no I don't own a bong or a crack pipe or anything.
     
  2. sinner

    sinner Member

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    Are you keeping your acoustic locked away in its case between playing? I have noticed that (vintage) acoutic guitars take a few minutes to open up after being tucked away in the case awhile.
     
  3. exhaust_49

    exhaust_49 Member

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    I always keep my guitar in a hardshell case between playing. It's also nowhere near vintage, it's 5 years old.
     
  4. mikeo2

    mikeo2 Member

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    Personally, I have never noticed that on any acoustic instruments. Maybe my ears aren't that great though!
     
  5. exhaust_49

    exhaust_49 Member

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    I was thinking about it some more and I think it's the strings warming up and slightly expanding.
     
  6. mt10

    mt10 Member

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    I don't have great ears either but I notice the same thing. Even more so if I pick up a guitar I haven't played in a while. After playing for a few minutes the guitar seems more playable with a richer tone. Could just be my hands gettings used to whatever I am playing at the moment. I don't know what it is, but I know what you are talking about.
     
  7. suttree

    suttree Member

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    i find that all good guitars do this. the better the guitar, the more it warms up with some playing. electrics and acoustics both. might be wiping off some of the gunk on the strings, but i suspect it's just a quality of a great guitar. they are resonsive, and that takes a few minutes to really come out. and i don't own a bong, either...
     
  8. johneeeveee

    johneeeveee Member

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    The top of an acoustic guitar acts as a bellows, and will vibrate more freely after it warms up for a bit. This works in the same way on the long term with guitars that are played a bunch over many years which allows them to "open up" tonally . You'll probably notice it more on "good" guitars that use quality wood, thinner tops, and functional bracing.

    Have fun - jv
     
  9. go7

    go7 Member

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    My Larrivee L-10 does the same thing. If you keep it in a case all buttoned up try openining the top of the case 10 -15 min. before you play. I do this with acoustic and electrics.
     
  10. snarkle

    snarkle Member

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    I've noticed this...and I've also noticed that it seems to vary from guitar to guitar. I have an old Larson Brothers-made Maurer that takes about 20 minutes to start sounding good. It sounds REALLY good after that, but it's a bit of work getting there.

    But my relatively new Beardsell sounds great pretty much right away, perhaps because it's very lightly built.

    I'm sure there's a physical explanation for this phenomenon, but I wonder if it's also a matter of the player having to attune his or herself to the guitar...of finding the right angle of attack on the strings, the sweet spot relative to the bridge, the proper playing position, etc.
     
  11. guitarplayer

    guitarplayer Member

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    I know this is a very debated issue but I put my Taylor 810 acoustic about 6 inches in front of two stereo speakers and cranked the stereo for several days while I was at work. This vibrated the $%# out of my guitar and after several days I definately heard a big difference in the tone. The bass was MUCH deeper and the tone was MUCH more open. I know this is still debated as to whether something like this would make any difference but as for me I'm SURE it did. I've also noticed there are days my guitar just sounds better than other days. I leave it on a stand in the same place in my humidified studio so the environment doesn't change so I'm not sure what's different. Maybe it has to do with whether or not I've played it recently. To me it makes sense that if, in general, old vintage acoustics sound better than new acoustics then the more your play your acoustic or the more it vibrates (i.e., setting in front of a stereo with the volume blasting) the better it will sound. :)
     
  12. Ogre

    Ogre Member

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    You have to warm up more than the guitar does. In my experience.
     
  13. JSeth

    JSeth Member

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    Absolutely! Every acoustic I've played has to warm up to my body and hands... and the tonal characteristics always change when this happens... I've had my Mark Angus #35 for 30 years now; sometimes, I'll pick it up and wonder what happened to my guitar?! Then I hold it for a few minutes, play it, everything warms up - and there's my baby again!
    BTW, don't even bother tuning an acoustic guitar until it's warmed up to you... unless you just want to tune it twice!
     

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