It's always when you're not looking that they come

sleshnyc

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,275
I wanted to spend some time with my 12yo son, a fledgling drummer so we got in the car and hit Sam Ash, then GC. Just goofing off, looking around. I was in the acoustic room at GC, playing a bunch of terribly set up, poor sounding Gibsons and Martins. I'm about to leave when I look down, and there, on a stand, is a 1987 Goodall Rosewood Standard. You know when you read those guys talk about how the second they picked up an instrument they just knew? Add this to the list. It's such an amazing instrument. Seriously just heads above the normal stuff. I wrote 3 songs in an hour just playing it. It's one of those instruments that brings forth the creativity, the passion to play. It's interesting. I own quite a few guitars, 25 or 30. But I have found over the years that the ones I regularly play are the ones that spoke to me the second I picked them up. The others are nice, and I play them, but my main guitars, there was never a doubt.
Anyway, if you can ever play a Goodall, do it.
 

monty

Member
Messages
22,264
Always a nice feeling, especially when the tunes just write themselves. congrats!
 

Spuddy

Member
Messages
130
I'm the same have 30ish Guitars most been in there hard cases for yrs. Only 1 really speaks to me.
 

Mikhael

Member
Messages
2,992
That happened when I picked up my Les Paul DeLuxe (which sadly no longer exists), and my Hamer Chaparral. Also, my Ibanez Classical, oddly enough.
 

PBGas

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
6,319
When they don't speak to me or stop talking, I usually send them to someone else for some conversation.
 

standard24

Member
Messages
9,080
A friend of mine had a Goodall built some years ago. He checked all the options except for the humidity controlled case. Special top, (Engleman spruce?), rosewood sides, Koa binding, 30,000 year old, mammoth ivory for the nut & saddle.

At the time, it cost him $7000. He started to feel a little guilty about spending so much. I suggested that it was way cheaper than a Harley, (or even a dirt bike), and that a fine instrument like that, can be a family heirloom. It will still be an awesome guitar in 200 years. A dirt bike would be rust.

It's the best sounding acoustic I've EVER played.
 

davess23

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
6,440
I'm happy for you. It's great to find a guitar like that-- at its best, it can be like meeting a new soul mate.

I've played several Goodalls over the years, and I agree that they're excellent instruments. If I recall correctly, back when yours was built he was making some nice guitars with old-growth koa, which at the time wasn't all that commonly used on much besides ukuleles.
 

nightbird

Member
Messages
355
I am with you! About 7 years ago i played a Goodall at the Olde Town Pickin' Parlor. Now, I own 2 fantastic acoustics ( Mossman Golden Era & D. W. Stevens) and that Goodall blew them away. In fact, it blew away any acoustic guitar I've ever played. I didn't have the available $ 4,500 at the time , but ifI had that would have been 'the' acoustic guitar to end all. And it was like yours with rosewood sides and back. But I disagree with you. If you get a chance to play one, don't do it. Because if you don't have the cash it will haunt you the rest of your days
 

klatuu

Member
Messages
2,449
When I was looking for an acoustic I too payed a Goodall that just blew me away. It was head and shoulders above everything else, but @ $4500 I just couldn't justify it. I bought a new Taylor 813 later that afternoon for $2800 and have been happy and satisfied, but that Goodall did really speak to me. If I played acoustics more than I do I would have worked it out, but an acoustic is not a priority for me.
 




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