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It's OK to refin your Vintage Strat, it won't lose its value

Discussion in '"Vintage" Instruments' started by kinmike, Sep 28, 2017.

  1. kinmike

    kinmike Supporting Member

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  2. walterw

    walterw Gold Supporting Member

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    ...only if you're george harrison
     
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  3. eclecticsynergy

    eclecticsynergy Member

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    If George had carved his name into a Strat, it would've increased in value. There aren't too many guys you could say that about.
     
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  4. Laurent Brondel

    Laurent Brondel Supporting Member

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    Speaking of Harrison, the 3 1/2 hours long Scorcese movie "George Harrison: Living in the material world" is pretty awesome if you haven't seen it already.
     
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  5. Shreve

    Shreve Katzenjammer Kid Gold Supporting Member

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    From my experience, a refin is always a refin. I tried to get my '56 back to factory colors/specs, but George never touched it. If it was an original finish, I'd just leave it be. Good luck!
     
  6. Stratburst70

    Stratburst70 Member

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    Even a factory refin takes the price down somewhat.
     
  7. nl128

    nl128 Silver Supporting Member

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    I Couldn't agree more. I thought it was absolutely outstanding.
     
  8. charliechitlins

    charliechitlins Member

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    While Les Paul was using an electric engraver to autograph the face of my '71 LP Deluxe gold top, my buddy turned to me and asked, "Does this mean, if somebody famous pisses on your guitar, it's worth more?"
    I'll never forget it!
     
  9. BadMojo

    BadMojo Supporting Member

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    Vintage guitars should be left alone no matter what.. ymmv
     
  10. Guitarworks

    Guitarworks Member

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    Worldwide fame gets a free pass from collectors. Celebrities can defy the laws of originality. All George had to do was sign a letter saying 'yeah it was mine' and the value increases fivefold. Your refin however, will cost you.
     
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  11. Hari Seldon

    Hari Seldon Member

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    Vintage violins (and these are really vintage) always get restored, and that's why they always rise in value.
    Crazy guitar world...
     
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  12. StJimmy

    StJimmy Member

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    You want to know how much the world has changed? I traded a guy a 75 Les Paul for a 59 Strat in 1976. It was an early 59 with a maple neck. (The guy that traded it to me sold it to me as a 1957 and no one in my world knew any different at the time.) No one hardly knew anything about serial numbers and build dates back in those days. I mailed "a letter" to Fender in 1976 to Fullerton, CA telling them the serial number and they responded with a letter including the old standard chart that shows where the serial number would have fallen out in those years.

    The body had been stripped to it's natural finish. In 1982, I decided to have the body refinished to its true original look. The guy that did it did a superb TWO tone finish.....which wouldn't have even been factory in 1959. They had moved on to three tone finish by 58. It is so weird that before the internet and the incredible amount of knowledge available at your fingertips, very few people had accurate knowledge back then.
     
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  13. slowerhand

    slowerhand Supporting Member

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    Wow, sounds like you really got scammed there. ;)
     
  14. VJF

    VJF Member

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    Do you still own it? Pics :)
     
  15. StJimmy

    StJimmy Member

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    Yep, I still have it. This is what it looked like in 1976 when I traded for it and the second pic is after I had the body refinished.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
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  16. Kmaz

    Kmaz Member

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    Nice refin!
     
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  17. VJF

    VJF Member

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    That refin looks fantastic!
     
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  18. StJimmy

    StJimmy Member

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    Thanks! Here's my thought on refins. Some guys won't touch buying a refin but if you buy a refin at the correct price, it will pretty much follow the same line of price increases and decreases as the original finish vintage model, (both guitars being otherwise equal). You're just into the guitar for half of what the other guy is.
     
  19. Mr Fingers

    Mr Fingers Member

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    I think the thread title is intended to be facetious, because the market itself has asked and answered this question a million tomes over. Refinishing is one of the most significant ways to devalue a guitar. That's because 90% of refins are done less well than even a mediocre factory finish, and buyers are rarely looking for whatever it was that the refinisher was trying to produce anyway. Sadly (IMO) even a brilliant refin on a thrashed original finish is an instant devaluation. Personally, I don't care one way or the other, as long as the refin is done to a high standard. But unless we're talking "The Fool" SG or a truly expert repair or restoration, refinishing is a major detriment in the general market. Buyers expect a big markdown.
     
  20. Muttlyboy

    Muttlyboy Member

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    I guess about 20 years ago or so, I missed out (thought about it too long) on a refinished early 60s Strat Professionally done in a beautiful 3 tone burst. I think it was about $1500

    Around the same time, a friend of mine bought a very clean 64 for about $5000.

    Sometimes I wonder how even the best experts could tell a refinish from an original if it was done by some of the amazing relic guys out there (Danocaster, GVVG, Nacho, etc.)
     

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