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It's OK to refin your Vintage Strat, it won't lose its value

Discussion in '"Vintage" Instruments' started by kinmike, Sep 28, 2017.

  1. winkofaneye

    winkofaneye Member

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    809
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    Jul 10, 2008
    Location:
    Wales,UK
    I own -

    56 Tele Clive Brown refin
    61 Strat original paint
    63 Tele Clive Brown refin
    63 Tele original paint
    65 Strat original paint
    67 Tele Clive Brown refin

    And they are ALL incredible guitars. I think the refin thing applies to guys who put them in glass cases, as the sound, as long as the refin is good, alters little.
     
  2. mad dog

    mad dog Silver Supporting Member

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    Montclair, NJ
    My '61 strat came to me with the body stripped, courtesy of the original owner's lopsided energy to brains ratio. It sounds too good to mess with. I would never risk a refin. No percentage in that for me.
    MD
     
  3. Strat

    Strat Member

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    I own a 59 strat - verified, that was damaged in 1966 and sent back to Fullerton by the local music shop - there were no local repair shops in those days - repainted and a '66 neck was put on. So - the "refin " was by Fender. STILL not as much on offers as for a complete 59 or 66....go figure.
     
  4. qblue

    qblue Member

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    NE Pennsylvania, Scranton
    I have a 1970 Strat that has an "orange-peel" Olympic white finish that probably Fender did without a Poly coat. So it has not yellowed over the years.

    The kicker is it has a '68 neck, evidenced by the dual Pat. Pend. numbers on the decal, under a nitro lacquer finish, which is a yellowish-brown in comparison to the remaining poly finish.

    I wonder if that affects resale, because it doesn't affect it's playability. It did have a refret in 2010, because those frets were shot.
     
  5. eclecticsynergy

    eclecticsynergy Member

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    My favorite Strat is a refin; a '63 that was repainted and refretted sometime before I bought her around '81 or '82. Friends said I was crazy to pay $950 for a refinished guitar. At the time that actually was a bit high but the guitar is very special- I was in love from the very first note. Worth somewhat more than that now of course. Selling has never even crossed my mind. One the best playing, best sounding guitars I've ever had the pleasure of meeting.
     
  6. stevieboy

    stevieboy Clouds yell at me Gold Supporting Member

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    Of course the thread title is tongue in cheek. And of course George’s Strat is particularly valuable because it’s George’s, and the fact that he painted it adds to that.

    I would also point out though that it wasn’t a vintage guitar at the time.
     
  7. eclecticsynergy

    eclecticsynergy Member

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    A lot was done then to guitars that are now vintage that would be considered butchery by today's standards. At the time, they were just guitars- no mystique, and most of 'em not very valuable for the time being. People carved them out for new pickups using chisels. So many guys sanded down their late-50s/early-60s Strats that by the mid-70s oiled natural was sort of a standard look for an older Strat. More common even than some factory colors like Candy Apple Red or Fiesta Red that were less common than the usual black, white or sunburst but not rare like Lake Placid Blue or Sherwood Green.
     

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