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Jack White on SNL...

Ry@n

Member
Messages
235
For some reason it hadn’t occurred to me this would be some people’s first exposure to “Lazaretto” , but of course it is... I had never noticed that song sounding like Rage Against the Machine, but I do hear it in this live version. The record sounds less-so to me, but it is still there, now that I am aware of it (the violin and backing vocals on the studio version take it in a different direction by quite a bit, though).
 
Messages
34
this is an interesting point of view and completley subjective as is any opinion of music
You're comparing Jack's SNL performance to Cream and saying because you don't hear elements of blues, jazz or soul r&b you don't find it interesting.
What elements of any particular genre did you hear in the performances?
So I'm old at 63, and remember hearing Cream at at age 11. Now I like Jack White for the most part. But for me this type of music lacks the Blues,Jazz and Soul R&B part that Cream's music.
how does one determine whether the intent of the band is to include or exclude any or all elements of those genres?
how does the inclusion or exclusion of those genres make the music any more or less valid
I heard elements of the blues and jazz in Jack's SNL performance
When I look back now at Jimi Hendrix,Cream, Led Zepplin,etc. I realize how much what they based their music on mattered.
I realize there is no right or wrong answer here but I find the way you qualify what good music is to you a bit odd
 

Maggot

Member
Messages
1,435
That whammy pedal on the leads has got to go, sounds horrible. :D
That's one of his signature sounds. It made me wonder why I got rid of my whammy pedal.

So I'm old at 63, and remember hearing Cream at at age 11. Now I like Jack White for the most part. But for me this type of music lacks the Blues,Jazz and Soul R&B part that Cream's music.
So while it has energy and passion it doesn't reach me and move me in any way.
It's just different blues and jazz. Jack White even sang a couple of verses of "Jesus Will Be Coming Soon" by the same Blind Willie Johnson who wrote, "In My Time of Dying," although Zep, characteristically gave themselves songwriting credit. And what is "Ball and Biscuit" but old fashioned blues-rock bombast like, "Hear My Train A-Coming" or "The Lemon Song"?

Jack White's main blues influences were acoustic country blues performers of the 20s and 30s, rather than the lead electric guitar players who a lot of 60s-70s rock stars idolized. I think it's easiest to understand 90s-00s alternative blues-rock if you think of Fred McDowell and RL Burnside as the Robert Johnson and Muddy Waters of that generation. To them Fred McDowell was the father of it all, the way that Robert Johnson was for Clapton. But a lot of the time Jack White goes even further back into the country blues tradition.
 
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JiveJust

Member
Messages
2,626
I've said it before and I'll say it again. Jack White is the most influential guitarist of his generation.

... and for reason. Music listeners in general know of Jack White, not just guitarists because he writes great songs and the guitar being his main instrument creates interest in the guitar for the masses. Jack makes guitar playing look like a helluva lot of fun (which it should be) and that's important for kids to get into guitar. Jack White has introduced young kids to Loretta Lynn and Wanda Jackson. That's just one of many examples.

Jack White is the current ambassador of guitar to the masses and we're lucky to have him.
 

BadHat

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
6,778
Yeah, when I read that post about Jack White getting rid of the Whammy, I thought that was pretty hilarious...
I guess it makes sense if you want to intentionally make your leads sound like ass. Definitely not getting lost in the mix with that tone. :D
 

jads57

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
6,085
I don't think it's odd at all seeing what any music is based on. If the foundation is weak then the music itself is weak. I fi d just about everything in EVERY genre has this exact problem.
I believe what most people relate to is the energy and look! Prince and Hendrix did both.
 

Ry@n

Member
Messages
235
I guess it makes sense if you want to intentionally make your leads sound like ass. Definitely not getting lost in the mix with that tone. :D
I’m not advocating for the Whammy as a pedal, but to say an effect an iconic guitar player has been using for decades as a signature sound has to go is, well... silly.
 

50MkII

Member
Messages
345
Maybe I missed it. Does anyone know what modifications were made to that blue EVH guitar White was using on SNL?
 

Maggot

Member
Messages
1,435
I guess it makes sense if you want to intentionally make your leads sound like ass. Definitely not getting lost in the mix with that tone. :D
Most great lead guitar players sound like ass. It takes that kind of abrasiveness to really take it to the next level. I've never wanted to live in the universe where David Gilmour sounded good and the Sympathy for the Devil solo sounded bad. That makes no sense to me.

JW has the chewiest lead tones ever. They're so fuzzy and distinctive. And I love the whammy. I bought a Whammy and started doing Jack White tricks with it a few years ago, and it worked for me, but I inexplicably sold it.
 

pup tentacle

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
1,828
Like him or not, Jack has his own thing going on. He's interesting. He wails on his guitars with reckless abandon. His music never sounds like a tired copy of anything else, to my ears. Aside from some similarity in the vocal style, Lazaretto sounds nothing like anything that ever came out of RATM.

I checked out one of his shows a couple years ago. A lot of what I observed going on around me, as well as many things I heard said, almost gave it a weird, cult-like feeling... like these people were worshipping him as undeniably being the greatest of all time. I've never felt like more of an outsider at any concert.
 
Messages
622
I always appreciate his stuff from a certain distance. It's cool, in a garagey Led Zep kind of way. Which isn't a bad thing. Instantly recognizable.
 

Ry@n

Member
Messages
235
Like him or not, Jack has his own thing going on. He's interesting. He wails on his guitars with reckless abandon. His music never sounds like a tired copy of anything else, to my ears. Aside from some similarity in the vocal style, Lazaretto sounds nothing like anything that ever came out of RATM.

I checked out one of his shows a couple years ago. A lot of what I observed going on around me, as well as many things I heard said, almost gave it a weird, cult-like feeling... like these people were worshipping him as undeniably being the greatest of all time. I've never felt like more of an outsider at any concert.
I think it’s the fuzzy bass part along with the vocal style. Like I said in a previous post, I never noticed it listening to the record, but I can hear it in the stripped-back trio arrangement, sort of.

The cult-like thing is a bit much. He’s great, and I love his work, but greatest of all time? Even if he was my favorite artist, I don’t think I could argue he’s the greatest of all time...
 

Devin

Low Voltage
Messages
3,827
Maybe I missed it. Does anyone know what modifications were made to that blue EVH guitar White was using on SNL?
none/allot as far as I know Jack was using these well before he passed and imo the "tribute" aspect was played up by snl or only gently suggested by someone in the works. He shot off a bit of tapping no big deal was made... thankfully he didn't go full eruption on us. Im sure Jack and his audience (mostly comprised of intolerable snobbish hipster millennials like myself) are acutely aware of the narrow venn-diagram intersection between EVH fans and JW fans. His EVH guitars are nearly all customized from the bottom up or might be fabricated except the neck. Some fancy luthier handles all his work. I'm pretty sure they use lace sensor pickups.

So I'm old at 63, and remember hearing Cream at at age 11. Now I like Jack White for the most part. But for me this type of music lacks the Blues,Jazz and Soul R&B part that Cream's music.
So while it has energy and passion it doesn't reach me and move me in any way.

When I look back now at Jimi Hendrix,Cream, Led Zepplin,etc. I realize how much what they based their music on mattered.
I'm not dissing anyone's likes, just pointing out something I realize as a life long musician.
You're in a safe place, I assume the majority of TGP users are in your demographic. I understand why it doesn't work for you. Lazaretto is not my favorite. Your reading of influences is interesting.

The thing about Jack that makes him different than those bands is his particular music history was not from music he heard growing up on the radio and electric blues players. He is more self curated drawing from influences of the influences of the bands you mentioned (very old delta blues music) combined with DIY "Punk" ideals present in the 90's Michigan scene and (he is/was a Stooges fan) not that he doesn't do some of the same things classic rock did but he doesn't do "grooving" like cream did or ballads like zep did later. Imo if you really want to know the core source of Jack's musical ethos you start with the flat duo Jets and branch out from there. A little hip hop too.
 
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jads57

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
6,085
Rockabilly in that clip for sure like Gene Vincent but with a lot of distortion
12 bar Blues form but not the actual groove at least for me.
But I can see how the energy and volu e appeal to younger players!

Even back in 60s and 70s most of the Blues guys didn't care for Jimi Hendrix treatment of the Blues form. So I guess I'm just saying at least with Jimi Hendrix etc. I appreciated his groove or feel!
 




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