Jazz or P-Bass?

walterw

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
37,528
Ended up with a Squier Classic Vibe Jazz because I just wanted something inexpensive (unlike my guitar gear).
there you go. i think of your choices, 5, 7, 9, and 10 were all likely jazz basses. (flea discovered the jazz just a couple of albums ago, and geddy started with it, went away from it in the synth-y '80s, and came back to it later.)
 

lgehrig4

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
6,064
I picked up the CMD121P but after reading more I may exchange for the Jeff Berlin model for the 15" speaker and no tweeter.

To be honest the bass is arriving tomorrow so I haven't even heard it. I'm not one to ask about bass gear anyway since this is my first and I'm sure this amp will sound good to me.
 

kenstee

Member
Messages
82
True. But..he was using a Fender VI short-scale 6-string bass for most of the recording of Fresh Cream.

According to his website: http://www.jackbruce.com/2008/Gear/gear.htm

"Though trained on the upright bass, Jack Bruce took a liking early on to small, short-scale electric basses. One of his first was the Fender Bass VI, a 6-string bass tuned EADGBE like a guitar, but one octave lower. Jack recorded most of Fresh Cream with this bass."
 

lgehrig4

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
6,064
Hey Jeff,

How do you like it? Which combo?
Just wanted to let you know I already exchanged the 1x12 combo for the Jeff Berlin model. Not that I didnt't like the other, but I read a lot on the Talkbass forum and a tweeterless, 1x15 seemed to be the way to go.

Overkill for me but thats just how I roll ;)
 
Messages
20,134
Just wanted to let you know I already exchanged the 1x12 combo for the Jeff Berlin model. Not that I didnt't like the other, but I read a lot on the Talkbass forum and a tweeterless, 1x15 seemed to be the way to go.

Overkill for me but thats just how I roll ;)
That's how I roll.

I stumbled on to the discovery that I like 15s by accident. When I was a kid, I was always running 2 bass cabs- a 4x10 and a Triad (15+10+horn). I always had the horn off on both cabs- Conventional wisdom (or at least the way I would always see it set up) is that you put the 4x10 on top of the 15 cab... but every once in a while the rig sounded AWESOME. Eventually, I put it together that when the rig sounded like I wanted it to sound- that's when someone either helped me or set my Triad cab on top of the 4x10.

I just prefer the sound of a 15.
 

fritzreiser

Supporting Member
Messages
276
Just wanted to let you know I already exchanged the 1x12 combo for the Jeff Berlin model. Not that I didnt't like the other, but I read a lot on the Talkbass forum and a tweeterless, 1x15 seemed to be the way to go.

Overkill for me but thats just how I roll ;)
:beer You have had some of the best guitar gear ever made. And lots of it.

Let me know how you like the Jeff Berlin model. I may have to trade up. :banana
 

lgehrig4

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
6,064
I can tell you right from the start it sounds bigger and deeper, but thats probably what you'd expect. Downside is that it's a lot bigger. I'm not in a band so it's a non-issue, but if you do you can't beat carrying around that little powerhouse you have.

I can't see myself indulging in multiple bass amps like I do guitar so I decide to just get the bigger one and call it quits. Instead of trading up you should connect a 1x15 cab for 500W of Thunder!
 
Messages
20,134
True. But..he was using a Fender VI short-scale 6-string bass for most of the recording of Fresh Cream.

According to his website: http://www.jackbruce.com/2008/Gear/gear.htm

"Though trained on the upright bass, Jack Bruce took a liking early on to small, short-scale electric basses. One of his first was the Fender Bass VI, a 6-string bass tuned EADGBE like a guitar, but one octave lower. Jack recorded most of Fresh Cream with this bass."
Between the Bass VI, the Danelectro Longhorn and the EB-3s- that pretty much covers Bruce's Cream era bass tones.

IMO, the stuff recorded with the Longhorn and the EB-3s are the things that are most identified as 'the Jack Bruce sound' as more people are more familiar with the Disraeli Gears, Wheels Of Fire and Goodbye tracks than the Fresh Cream tracks.
 

Alvis

Member
Messages
3,318
When I was a teenager starting out I wanted a Jazz ,because JPJ played a Jazz (actually at that time he was playing an Alembic,who wasn't...)
But over time I figured I liked a big klunky P-neck & tone. It's hard to frick up a P bass,they're like an old F-series pickup truck. And I aint even Jaco

 

LarryNJ

Senior Member
Messages
181
That's very cool!
Thanks-

http://www.henmanguitars.com/

It's a Henman-Bevalacqua B4, built by Scotty Bevalacqua who has some serious creds as a builder. The bass has a very unique truss-rod design, great woods, and superb tone.
As you can see by the website, Rick Turner will now be involved in the Company's products.

One of my favorite "J"style basses.
 

LarryNJ

Senior Member
Messages
181
That's almost Thunderbird territory...

The more I see it, the more I like it.
... I like it too!

The "melted J" shape kinda does get a T-Bird vibe, now that you mention.

I've heard comments on this model ranging from "fugly", "ridiculously (over) priced" ;"WHY EMG HZ's?" etc.
to ""Awesome".

I myself tend to go with the "awesome" crowd having owned this bass for about a year- It does a GREAT sonic interpretation of a J as well as having it's own totally distinct voice.
 

LeftyBass

Member
Messages
95
True. But..he was using a Fender VI short-scale 6-string bass for most of the recording of Fresh Cream.

According to his website: http://www.jackbruce.com/2008/Gear/gear.htm

"Though trained on the upright bass, Jack Bruce took a liking early on to small, short-scale electric basses. One of his first was the Fender Bass VI, a 6-string bass tuned EADGBE like a guitar, but one octave lower. Jack recorded most of Fresh Cream with this bass."
And of course "White Room" is Danelectro Longhorn.
 

Jerryr

Member
Messages
187
I currently own both an American Standard P-bass and J-bass. For the last 12 years I played the US J-Bass, an EB Stingray and an Ibanez ATK300.

The Stingray was a nice bass but I decided to sell it because the Ibanez ATK-300 was a pretty good copy of the Stingray. Actually the only time I got any positive comments from the other band members was when I played the Ibanez??

I recently bought the P-Bass (I owned one back in the 70's) because I'm doing a pretty big classic rock show this summer.

I find the P-Bass has a harder hitting bottom end than the J-Bass. By comparison the J-bass is more polite and mellow and Hi-Fi sounding..... with a nice growl. The P-Bass has a little less of that really low mellow stuff and some kind of a tight punchy upper bass that projects well. I've only used the P-Bass to record with so far but I find that it is much easier to fit into a rock mix. It dominated the bottom end without messing up the mids too much. I'm generally able to reduce the level of the P-Bass track and still cut through.

My dislikes with the standard J-Bass are the amount of noise you get when using the, single coil, pickups individually. 99% of the time I play with both turned up full because there is a humbucking effect. Fortunately it sounds great that way but it limits the versatility which is one of the reason for buying a J-Bass. Also the dual volume control arrangement is a PITA. I know I could probably install low noise pickups and rewire the controls to get a volume and blend control, but I hate to mess with this classic bass too much.

The Ibanex ATK-300 is actually a pretty versatile bass for around $500-$600 that may be better value than a Mexican Fender?? It's really great if you slap at all..... just feels natural. Mine is one of the original series and I'm not sure what the new reissues are like. They have a solid ash body and P-Bass like neck.

I agree a P-Bass with J pickup at the bridge is a great way to go.
 
Messages
301
The Wall: when I saw Waters play it was always a P-Bass.
P bass with flatwound strings. Most tracks on The Wall use a slight analog delay as well, to get that signature tone.

Flea: Not sure...MusicMan Stingray? Again P W/Jazz PU should get you there.
Stingray for sure on the early stuff, then he went to Modulus. Not sure that a passive P or J would get close to Flea's tone

Zep stuff was I think done early with P-Bass, later with Alembic equipment.
JPJ used a '61 Jazz bass up on all Zep recordings up until he switched to Alembic sometime in the mid-late 1970s.


Mark
 

FFTT

Member
Messages
28,385
I couldn't make up my mind either, so I went for a PJ configuration with
push pull Hot/Vintage switches on each pickup. What would be the tone pot
on a Jazz layout is the balance control.

Anderson era '79 Schecter USA Custom Shop
1 piece Koa Body, Pau Ferro neck, Tele Bass headstock.

 




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