Jazz tone settings

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by BarryE, Feb 16, 2012.

  1. BarryE

    BarryE Member

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    Using an epiphone hollowbody (one neck humbucker) into a DRRI what would you put the tone settings on to get that classic 60's Kenny Burrell or stereotypical jazz guitar sound?

    Just curious, haven't quite found what I want yet. Thick pick, 12's not flatwound though.
     
  2. cratz2

    cratz2 Member

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    I'd say neck pickup, volume and tone rolled back between 50 and 75% on the guitar would be the starting point THEN adjust the amp from there starting the Treble at about 4 and the bass about 6.

    I like just enough top end from the amp to sound not muddy but definitely not enough top end that you can easily tell it's a Fender amp.

    In my experience, rolling off the controls on the guitar is absolutely essential. Even if you dial in a decent amount of top end on the amp, having the controls on the guitar rolled back kills off some of the attack.
     
  3. Bebop Tom

    Bebop Tom Member

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    The classic jazz tone from that era is flatwounds, heavier than .12s. Don't roll the tone control too low or it will sound like mud.
     
  4. BarryE

    BarryE Member

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    yeah, was thinking about the flatwounds, just not sure if I want to go there. Probably should try them again.
     
  5. TheBigFlatwound

    TheBigFlatwound Member

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    Def give the flatwounds a try - thomastik are expensive but the best strings around. I use 14's. Kenny B's sound is awesome. I also think a wood bridge might make a diff in his sound.

    The other poster is right in that you don't want to roll off too much on the tone - it will just sound muffled at one point.

    My problem is getting a good jazz tone when using laptop/digital interface - all the digital modelers stink for clean sounds. IMO
     
  6. Bebop Tom

    Bebop Tom Member

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    For most of Kenny Burrell's career he has used a tuneamatic bridge. Even his D'Angelico had one. Heavy flatwound strings can counteract the tuneamatic's brightness. Old nylon saddles that were used in the early to mid 60's are less tinny sounding. However, wooden saddles are fairly cheap and worth trying if you want to bring out more of an archtop acoustic sound. They certainly are the norm in jazz, just not with Kenny Burrell (or Wes).
     
  7. cratz2

    cratz2 Member

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    Well, yeah... I don't mean to roll the tone completely away, but with most non-jazz specific guitars I've played in the last 30 years, you are unlikely to get a traditional jazz sound out of a Fender Blackface-voiced amp with the guitar controls all the way up.

    :bonk

    And I definitely agree to try flats.
     
  8. BarryE

    BarryE Member

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    have a wood bridge now, tried a tune-a-matic but it was a little brighter. Getting closer with the amp rolled down, not so sure I like the volume rolled off however.

    flats go on tonight
     
  9. BarryE

    BarryE Member

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    put the flats on, set the amp treble to 2, bass to 6, guitar tone to 5 and the tone is there. Now if I could just get the guitar to play the right notes...
     
  10. cratz2

    cratz2 Member

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    Are you trying to wing it or are you taking any sort of lessons?
     
  11. Average Joe

    Average Joe Member

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    I generally find it easier to find a balanced soud with the guitar's tone control up and then turning the treble down at the amp. But I'll second both the flatwounds and turning the guitar volume dow, at least just a hair.
     
  12. snakestretcher

    snakestretcher Member

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    I have a lot of Kenny Burrell's work on CD, and his tone tends to be on the brighter side of your typical amp-under-a-blanket jazz tone-(think Jim Hall). Set the tones flat on the amp (12 o'clock), and roll off a little on the guitar. Use a fat pick to beef-up the tone even if you don't use heavy strings.
     

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