Jazz vs. Precision

s2y

Member
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19,530
no, that makes some sense; a lot of guitar players who like big ol' fat necks (like me) tend to wrap the thumb over blues-style, as opposed to proper "thumb on the back" technique.

for bass though, a skinny J neck is really good for that, too.
LOL, I sometimes like toying with folks over that. I once had an instructor that forced me to do everything proper. I resisted initially, but it paid off in the long run. With the exception of hard V neck shapes, there aren't too many guitar or bass necks I can't navigate. I refuse to play basses with neck dive. Regardless, very few modern musicians, especially the self-taught have fairly poor technique as far as "proper" goes. Then again, taking lessons from an instructor who is also self-taught might not help things, either.
 

FFTT

Member
Messages
28,352
This statement seems to suggest a difference in scale length between Jazz and P-basses. The distance (if this is what was meant by "reach") between frets is exactly the same, with both having a 34" scale length. The only difference is the width of the neck at the nut, and, for a period (70's?), the Precision bass had the same narrow width at the nut as the Jazz.
The distance between frets may be the same, but I always felt I had to
stretch more using a P bass.

The width of the neck and a shape of the back of the neck are most likely
the cause, but either way I always felt a P-Bass required more effort
to play, especially when you have short fingers.
 

c_mac

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
4,147
I pretty much played P's by default for several years. Just never had the opportunity to play a J. Then that fateful day happened, never had another P and only play J's these days.
 

walterw

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
38,748
Which neck does the Fender PJ bass have?
there is no "the fender PJ bass".

fender has various specialty and signature models, some of which use the PJ setup, but that was never a stock item.

personally, i'm not a fan; the output is really unbalanced between the two pickups, so the J ends up just being there as a "modifier" for the P, adding some treble and scooping out mids as it's brought in. trying to wind them differently to compensate just compromises the sound of each pickup individually.

that J pickup also hums, unless you use a hum-canceling version.

finally, spacing is an issue, as you typically have to either install the J in the more trebly '70s position further back, or move the P pickup up towards the neck a little, thus out of its ideal spot, to avoid phasing issues from them being too close together.
 

joe_jr

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
1,645
I cant stand the tapered J neck, i dont know why :(. but I like the fat P-bass sound anyway

I'm so screwed up when it comes to Fender necks that I don't know what to do any more. My '62 RI J has the perfect tone for my band, but I don't like the thin neck. My Squier P has the best feeling neck I've ever played (IMO), but isn't bright enough sounding to use onstage. I may just have to get a bass made with the right combination of parts one of these days.
 
Messages
8,093
I'm so screwed up when it comes to Fender necks that I don't know what to do any more. My '62 RI J has the perfect tone for my band, but I don't like the thin neck. My Squier P has the best feeling neck I've ever played (IMO), but isn't bright enough sounding to use onstage. I may just have to get a bass made with the right combination of parts one of these days.
Swap the necks. Take advantage of the genius of Leo Fender!

I play a Jazz some and don't mind the skinny neck too much; same with my Skwire "second edition" tele bass-style cheapo thing. I played my '68 Tele bass the other night and the neck seemed too massive. I brought out my '61 Pee bass for the first time in a long time and it was absolutely dreamy!!!! And the sound: OMG!!! It makes me play soooooooooo much better, too! I believe the '68 tele will be up for sale soon...
 

Endr_rpm

Member
Messages
3,253
IMO, the ultimate Pj, the G&L SB2


I own one (not this one), and it is my # 1 Bass. Always sits perfectly in the mix, can be super aggressive or super mellow, and with the #8 neck, plays like butter with no hand fatigue for hours. Only downside is it's a heavy mofo :)
 

rockbite

Member
Messages
4
Hi,

Old thread but the whole P vs J vs PJ thing is on my mind right now.

I've been thinking about routing for dual P-pickups, normal P slot and J bridge position. I'm questioning whether the added complexity is worthwhile and wanted to check if anyone likes a Px2 setup?

Thanks,
Kerry
 

BlueTalon

Member
Messages
351
I have a bass with a Px2 setup, and I love it. It's not a Fender, though, it's a BC Rich Mockingbird.

 

walterw

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
38,748
and that's pretty much the only time you ever see it, on BC riches and the like.

i think it looks really cool, like a truck with big monster tires on it, but i never cared for the sound.
 

s2y

Member
Messages
19,530
and that's pretty much the only time you ever see it, on BC riches and the like.

i think it looks really cool, like a truck with big monster tires on it, but i never cared for the sound.
Peavey had a TL bass with double P pickups. I've seen a good amount on Talk Bass, but never heard one.
 

BlueTalon

Member
Messages
351
I love the sound. The tone is far more flexible than you might otherwise guess. I think people get locked into the idea of "this is what a P pickup sounds like because that's what a P bass sounds like", and it's not necessarily true.
 

zeffbeff

Member
Messages
2,166
Resurrection for more P and J info...
I much prefer the Jazz.

More comfortable neck width and also more comfortable body shape.

I always play my jazz bass with both pickups fully on. Add some overdrive and compression, and the growl is just unbelievable.
 

StratoCraig

Member
Messages
3,215
I disagree that a PJ is the "best of both worlds"; I would say rather it is the worst of both. The thing is, I hate hum. A Precision with its split-coil pickup is hum-free; a Jazz with both pickups at the same volume is hum-free because the pickups are of opposite winding and polarity; but a PJ is only hum-free if you never use the bridge pickup, at which point you might as well just have a Precision. Someone who hates hum less than me may feel differently, but that's how I see it. You can, of course, install a hum-canceling bridge pickup (Fralin Split-Coil Jazz, for example), and that would be pretty cool, but I don't know of any PJ bass that comes stock with one of those.
 




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