Jazzmaster/Mustang/Jaguar Differences

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by mingo, Apr 28, 2005.


  1. mingo

    mingo Member

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    Hi I was wondering if someone could outline some of the differences between these guitars?

    Are mustangs any good?

    How's the whammy bar on these guitars, do they stay in tune well?

    How are the Japan models verses Reissues, and vintage ones.

    Thanks!
     
  2. John Phillips

    John Phillips Member

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    Jazzmaster - 21-fret, 25.5" scale. Full thickness body. 'Floating' tremolo that works very well if set up correctly (which is something that a lot of techs have difficulty with, for some reason). It feels looser than a Strat, and doesn't have the same range, but it does stay in tune very well. Large single-coil pickups that sound bigger and deeper than normal Fender single-coils. Quite a full-sounding guitar that works well for most 'alt' styles - especially semi-clean to fuzzy/distorted, but also works reasonably well for some more traditional blues-based overdrive tones, although singing sustain is not its strong point. 10s are about the minimum practical string gauge.

    Jaguar - 22-fret, 24" scale. Full thickness body. Same tremolo as the Jazzmaster. Narrow, more traditional Fender single-coil pickups, that sound more focused and percussive. They're not identical to Strat pickups though - they have metal 'claw' brackets that widen the magnetic field and actually make the electric sound darker, although this is offset by the brighter, thinner sound of the bridge and short scale. Less apparent sustain than the Jazzmaster, although actually it's about the same overall, but with a very sharp, snappy attack that makes the decay after it seem quicker. Works very well either totally clean or with very heavy fuzz/distortion, but poorly with mild overdrive - the notes seem to 'die'. More of an alt/grunge guitar. 11s are the minimum gauge that works well (original ones often have too powerful a trem spring for anything lighter).

    Mustang - 22-fret, 24" scale. Thin body. Different trem - awkward to set up and not very stable, a lot of people lock them down - but sustains a bit better than the Jaguar. The bridge has different, non-height adjustable saddles that some people prefer, and will fit on the Jaguar/Jazzmaster bridge. Strat-type pickups (nearly identical, but with hidden polepieces). Has phase switching too, so it can do some really funky, 'chinky' tones. Slightly cleaner and brighter-sounding than the Jaguar overall. They work OK with 10s - the string length behind the bridge is much shorter than the Jaguar - but 11s are better.

    (There are rare early Mustangs with the 21-fret 22.5"-scale neck - usually the narrow A-width, but they don't work very well... best avoided unless you have tiny hands.)

    The US RIs (Jazzmaster and Jaguar only) are good - they don't IMO have quite the character of the old ones, but close. Later 60s (and particularly early-70s) models are good guitars and not too expensive, if you don't mind the block-marker bound necks and bigger headstocks. IMO the Japanese ones aren't too bad, but need major electrics upgrades. The woodwork and fretting is good, and the metal hardware not bad. But you can get originals for not a lot more - an original Jag in particular is possibly less expensive than a US RI, unless you must have a pre-CBS one in a cool color. Original Mustangs aren't expensive (or rare) at all, I really don't see the point in the Japanese reissue, especially as it's IMO the least good of the three.

    I've played all of these a fair bit BTW - the Jaguar was actually my favorite, although I liked the Mustang too, for it's own different sound. The Jazzmaster seems the most popular generally - I think most people find the longer scale easier to get on with. I liked the short-scale ones... but I do have small hands. I think at one point I had most of the short-scale Fenders in my part of the world ;) - I've owned a '65 Jag, '65 & '77 Mustangs, '64 Duo-Sonic (same as the Mustang but with no trem - an excellent and under-rated guitar), '65 and '78 Musicmasters (same as the Duo-Sonic but with just a neck pickup) and a '78 Bronco (same as the Musicmaster but with the pickup at the bridge, and yet another style of trem), and... two Swingers! An oddity made of left-over short-scale Mustang and Musicmaster parts, on cut-down Bass V bodies...

    :)
     
  3. mingo

    mingo Member

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    Geez thanks John for the in depth detail on the guitars.

    I'd love to get a US Jazzmaster, or a vintage one, but don't have the funds, probably better off getting a Japan made one.

    I was thinking of getting a vintage mustang, but i don't know if that's what i'm looking for. i want something cool/different, good sounding and that has a good whammy bar. You don't know where to find any do you??

    thanks,
    Jason

    http://www.satelliterides.com
     
  4. John Phillips

    John Phillips Member

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    Keep looking for a used US RI Jazzmaster or a beat-up 70s one - they went right up to the end of the 70s, and the later ones aren't worth all that much... they also didn't seem to suffer quality-wise anywhere near as much as Strats. Either of these is a far better guitar than a MIJ one, IMO - if you get a MIJ, budget for replacing both pickups and all the pots and wiring to even get close the same league... makes them look like less of a bargain. The hardware (especially the trem) is still inferior too.

    Old Jaguars are proportionately cheaper than Jazzmasters, but they stopped in 1974 so there's a bit more of a 'vintage' premium there.

    You'll get either one a lot easier and probably a bit cheaper over there than I can too!

    If you want a really good trem, you don't want a Mustang, unfortunately.
     
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  5. Grap

    Grap Member

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    I'ev got a '95 MIJ Jazzmaster that I bought new, and I've never played an original one. With that as background, here's my comments:

    1) The trem stays in tune quite well, but you have to be careful with the pivoting bridge. If it ends up leaning with the trem at rest then your intonation goes all to hell. Some players fix this by wrapping insulating tape around the bridge posts so that they can't move inside their post holes.

    2) The eternal Jazzmaster design fault is that the string angle over the bridge it so low that there's very little downwards force on the bridge saddles. This leads to all sorts of problems, buzzes, rattles and strins poppnig right off of saddles. It's especially painful with lower gauge strings (9's or 10's). Now then, bear in mind that this guitar was designed in '57 for Jazz players using heavy strings. Put a set of 13-62 flat-wounds on one and they work in this context. To get one to work with lighter strings there are two options:

    - Increase the break angle over the bridge by shimming the neck.
    - Install a buzz-stop, which is a cunning device tht attaches to the two trem-plate screws closest to the bridge. It has a roller bearing close to the body top that the strings pass under before going over the bridge. I have one fitted to mine and I now have no problem with 9's.

    3) The body finish on mine is very delicate. As I said, it's a Fotoflame. I had it drop off a strap while I was kneeling to adjust an effects pedal once. The but end of teh guitar fell maybe three inches onto a hardwood floor and the finish cracked up like cake icing! Soft wood & thin finish = fragile!

    4) The pickups are apparantly nothing like Jazzmaster originals. I wouldn't know but they sound fine to me. I've not had a problem with the pots & switches either.

    Cheers - Steve
     
  6. KHK

    KHK Silver Supporting Member

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    Great profile John!

    In terms of price, wasn't the Jag top of the line?

    How do all of the position switches and dial nobs work on the Jaguar? Was fender going for a varitone thing or the Epi Al Caiola with the pre-sets?

    I had never heard of swingers before.

    Your posts are always very informative
     
  7. mingo

    mingo Member

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    what are the rollers and switches for exactly on the jazzmaster?

    what are some good settings for different tones??

    thanks
     
  8. Grap

    Grap Member

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    The Jazzmaster controls work as follows:

    With the slider switch on the upper horn in the down position you have both pickups available via the lower horn's toggle switch and the volume and tone knobs.

    With the slider switch in the up position you just get the neck pickup controlled by the upper bout's volume and tone roller controls.

    On my CIJ model the pickups are RWRP, so that when you run them together they are hum cancelling. I don't know about the originals and USA Reissues.

    - Steve
     
  9. mingo

    mingo Member

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    Thanks, i think that's pretty clear.

    So what times do you think are good to put it in the up postition???
     

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