JHS Legends Fuzz - no room for battery

tubekingsley

Member
Messages
3,058
Maybe. I’m not sure what to think. I definitely felt like they were marketed as copies with an additional mode.
Keep reading- he says the original is finicky, and he says he wondered if he could recreate it, in a more consistent, dependable, affordable form. I'm convinced it doesn't use transistors, which actually makes it more interesting to me since I don't need anymore fuzz.
He never says it uses silicon transistors, either. Someone here knows for sure, and this will be cleared up
 
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M

Member 995

Keep reading- he says the original is finicky, and he says he wondered if he could recreate it, in a more consistent, dependable, affordable form. I'm convinced it doesn't use transistors, which actually makes it more interesting to me since I don't need anymore fuzz
It then says:

“The end result is a pedal that gives you the touch, feel, and response of the vintage germanium fuzz but with accuracy and consistency of carefully chosen modern silicon transistors.”

So not germanium, silicon.
 

tubekingsley

Member
Messages
3,058
It then says:

“The end result is a pedal that gives you the touch, feel, and response of the vintage germanium fuzz but with accuracy and consistency of carefully chosen modern silicon transistors.”

So not germanium, silicon.
Oh, well there's the answer- I'm wrong. And you had the answer all along, but didn't mention it
 
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jlcogar

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
421
Batteries must be bigger these days. Dug out the old blue mxr 6 band a while back and couldn’t get a battery in it. You would think if anything they’d be smaller. Electrolytic caps sure are. If it don’t fit don’t force it. Yeah, thats what she said.
 

viper jazz

Member
Messages
89
Multiple TWSS jokes, flareups both defending/trashing a controversial pedal brand, someone martyring themselves on page 1 because another person used the forum for advice, nerd talk about BATTERY size...this is peak TGP.

And all in 3 pages. You mad lads...you've actually gone and done it. Peak performance.
 

Tootone

Member
Messages
5,715
Also, you're better off using a carbon zinc battery, rather than alkaline, since it's a fuzz pedal.
I've heard this before. This myth, to date, is my all time winner of the "Biggest Load Of Old Toss" prize.

Batteries provide charge (9 volts in this case), which is stored electrons, which when released, flow to make electric current.

Electrons are the same whether they are stored in Carbon-Zinc, Alkaline or Lithium Batteries.

When I first heard this, there was a website selling NOS Carbon-Zinc 9v batteries for a mere $30 each. LMFAO.

... as batteries de-charge, the voltage steadily drops from 9v... 8...7...6...5...
Which will eventually lead to the Starved Amp spluttery splatty effect on the fuzz circuit. Once again, this has got FA to do with the battery type. Some Fuzz manufacturers (including JHS) now actually include a Voltage Divider circuit to lower the voltage to the Fuzz amp, if you really want that normally short lived "dieing battery" sound all the time.

Back to OP @Fendrix ...

Get some packing foam, wrap it around the battery, tape it up, and place it in the fatter part of the wedge. Quick and Dirty solution.
 

S. F. Sorrow

Member
Messages
8,099
I just looked at my 9V battery pile. Energizer, Duracell (alkalines) and Rayovac, Sunbeam (carbon) are the same size on all sides. Common batteries and should fit if designed properly.
 

Adagietto

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,192
I've heard this before. [MOD EDIT]

Batteries provide charge (9 volts in this case), which is stored electrons, which when released, flow to make electric current.

Electrons are the same whether they are stored in Carbon-Zinc, Alkaline or Lithium Batteries.

When I first heard this, there was a website selling NOS Carbon-Zinc 9v batteries for a mere $30 each. [MOD EDIT]

... as batteries de-charge, the voltage steadily drops from 9v... 8...7...6...5...
Which will eventually lead to the Starved Amp spluttery splatty effect on the fuzz circuit. Once again, this has got FA to do with the battery type. Some Fuzz manufacturers (including JHS) now actually include a Voltage Divider circuit to lower the voltage to the Fuzz amp, if you really want that normally short lived "dieing battery" sound all the time.

Back to OP @Fendrix ...

Get some packing foam, wrap it around the battery, tape it up, and place it in the fatter part of the wedge. Quick and Dirty solution.
Batteries have impedance. This is said to interact with FF circuits in particular. Perhaps the nature of the impedance varies with chemistry and other construction details. This impedance, or internal resistance, is what causes a battery to lose voltage as it discharges (series resistance increases, voltage available to load decreases). Because of this, the voltage is dependent on the load — a dynamic load can cause voltage fluctuations. This is different from changing the voltage on a regulated power supply, which has virtually 0Ω output resistance, and therefore maintains voltage regardless of load.

That said, I'm not going to argue with what people hear or don't hear. But technically it's a little more interesting than it might appear on the surface.
 
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zombiwoof

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,884
I also think the OP should buy a couple of cheap carbon zinc batteries, I think they sound better in vintage fuzz circuits, and from my experience most seem to run smaller in size than the modern Alkaline batteries. I have found this to be a problem in some pedals, like the Nobels pedals, where the battery fills the space for it completely. Some modern batteries are noticeably bigger, and I have a hard time closing the battery door if I try to use them. I like the RayOVac heavy duty batteries that you can buy cheap in multipacks from places like Walmart, but even the 2 for a buck ones from a dollar store work well in a vintage fuzz circuit IMO.
Al
 

Tootone

Member
Messages
5,715
Batteries have impedance. This is said to interact with FF circuits in particular. Perhaps the nature of the impedance varies with chemistry and other construction details. This impedance, or internal resistance, is what causes a battery to lose voltage as it discharges (series resistance increases, voltage available to load decreases). Because of this, the voltage is dependent on the load — a dynamic load can cause voltage fluctuations. This is different from changing the voltage on a regulated power supply, which has virtually 0Ω output resistance, and therefore maintains voltage regardless of load.

That said, I'm not going to argue with what people hear or don't hear. But technically it's a little more interesting than it might appear on the surface.
Impedance :facepalm. Battery is a DC power source, and decoupled from the AC signal in the circuit.

I kinda knew I'd get "feedback". Convene an old wives club and discuss amongst yourselves. I'm done. :munch

Any unwary prospective Fuzz (with Battery) users. Carbon-Zinc or Alkaline, Its up to you.
 

Adagietto

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,192
Impedance :facepalm. Battery is a DC power source, and decoupled from the AC signal in the circuit.

I kinda knew I'd get "feedback". Convene an old wives club and discuss amongst yourselves. I'm done. :munch

Any unwary prospective Fuzz (with Battery) users. Carbon-Zinc or Alkaline, Its up to you.
Yes, a battery is a DC source, a "non-ideal" one at that. It's traditionally modeled as an ideal source (which has zero resistance) with an added series resistor. Physical devices diverge from their ideal models. Sometimes these things matter.
 

Tootone

Member
Messages
5,715
Yes, a battery is a DC source, a "non-ideal" one at that. It's traditionally modeled as an ideal source (which has zero resistance) with an added series resistor. Physical devices diverge from their ideal models. Sometimes these things matter.
A battery is not a resistor (its an insulator). Its a capacitor with a positive charge on one side and a negative charge on the other.
 

tubekingsley

Member
Messages
3,058
An Alkaline battery will sound a bit dull in a germanium fuzzface, it will lose a lot of character (you can hear the difference in a sound sample above). It's not just the voltage that makes batteries and power supplies sound different. It's the resistance, inductance, and capacitance in the battery, which is part of the circuit in a fuzzface.
Analogman

@Tootone
 
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webs

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,200
A battery is not a resistor (its an insulator). Its a capacitor with a positive charge on one side and a negative charge on the other.
It's ok to just say you don't hear a difference or don't care. There's nothing wrong with that. But you've made a leap from having your own opinion about a thing to dropping some claims in defense of your opinion that appear silly. For one thing, usually the "good" fuzz batteries are super cheap dollar-store specials; that you're upset about some goofball trying to make a buck on snake oil isn't evidence of anything in this context. Another is that your posts, and I don't know of a nicer way to put this, do not appear to be coming from a place of knowledge. Saying things like "a battery is not a resistor" in response to someone trying (politely!) to explain that they have resistance, and to immediately follow it up with "it's a capacitor" makes it look like you have made up your mind and aren't interested in understanding.

Saying "electrons are the same" is facile and doesn't even begin to address the conversation.
 




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