John Syke's modded JCM800, I have never heard such a unique amp.

SgtThump

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I always thought it was a Mesa Mark series amp, so I did a quick search.

https://www.johnsykes.com/equipment.html

"For much of the Whitesnake '87 album and first Blue Murder album John used 2 Mesa Boogie Coliseum heads. These amps have a Mark III pre-amp section but use six 6L6 power tubes--giving the amps180 watts each! John also owns several Mesa Boogie Mark IIC+'s, Mark III's and some rack mounted Mesa Dual Recto heads. Other Mesa Boogie equipment includes a Tri-Axis preamp and a Strategy 500 Power Amp."
 

Terry McInturff

40th Anniversary of guitar building!
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Keep in mind that Mssr. Syke's guitar signal, very likely, passed through one heck of a lot of processing/modifying before it reached your ears.
It is extraordinarily common/standard procedure with big rock tracks to "carve" the various instrumental tracks in order that they sit in the band mix appropriately and...if we could listen to the final treatment on a given guitar track...it is often rather unappealing on it's own.

And so it can be hard to say just how that amp sounded out there on the studio floor....
 

CUCKSQUAD

Member
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16
I always thought it was a Mesa Mark series amp, so I did a quick search.

https://www.johnsykes.com/equipment.html

"For much of the Whitesnake '87 album and first Blue Murder album John used 2 Mesa Boogie Coliseum heads. These amps have a Mark III pre-amp section but use six 6L6 power tubes--giving the amps180 watts each! John also owns several Mesa Boogie Mark IIC+'s, Mark III's and some rack mounted Mesa Dual Recto heads. Other Mesa Boogie equipment includes a Tri-Axis preamp and a Strategy 500 Power Amp."
He used the Coliseum for all the rhythm tracks. All the solos were done on the Marshall.
 

CUCKSQUAD

Member
Messages
16
Keep in mind that Mssr. Syke's guitar signal, very likely, passed through one heck of a lot of processing/modifying before it reached your ears.
It is extraordinarily common/standard procedure with big rock tracks to "carve" the various instrumental tracks in order that they sit in the band mix appropriately and...if we could listen to the final treatment on a given guitar track...it is often rather unappealing on it's own.

And so it can be hard to say just how that amp sounded out there on the studio floor....
The second link is a soundboard, its not even from a live album, so theres very little mixing/editing and its pretty damn close to the first link, any differences could easily be down to general amp settings.
 

Jim S

Platinum Supporting Member
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15,060
Keep in mind that Mssr. Syke's guitar signal, very likely, passed through one heck of a lot of processing/modifying before it reached your ears.
It is extraordinarily common/standard procedure with big rock tracks to "carve" the various instrumental tracks in order that they sit in the band mix appropriately and...if we could listen to the final treatment on a given guitar track...it is often rather unappealing on it's own.

And so it can be hard to say just how that amp sounded out there on the studio floor....
Tangentially for another rabbit hole, Michael Wagener had 17 mics in the room at one time during a George Lynch recording session. Chasing recorded tones using their precise gear has the potential of a Pandora’s box.
 

Terry McInturff

40th Anniversary of guitar building!
Platinum Supporting Member
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6,867
The second link is a soundboard, its not even from a live album, so theres very little mixing/editing and its pretty damn close to the first link, any differences could easily be down to general amp settings.
And also proximity effect, overall mic coloration, where the mic was aimed, mic preamp, that sort of thing? Is it safe to assume that the mic capsule was at-or-near the grill cloth, a position that we don not normally listen to an amp from?
But as you point out, any similarities betwixt soundboard recording/studio recording can indeed provide some useful info so many thanks for pointing that out sir! :)
 

CUCKSQUAD

Member
Messages
16
And also proximity effect, overall mic coloration, where the mic was aimed, mic preamp, that sort of thing? Is it safe to assume that the mic capsule was at-or-near the grill cloth, a position that we don not normally listen to an amp from?
But as you point out, any similarities betwixt soundboard recording/studio recording can indeed provide some useful info so many thanks for pointing that out sir! :)
Its pretty obvious thats the same amp used in both those solos. Do you need an entire rig rundown or can you trust your ears for once?
 

Terry McInturff

40th Anniversary of guitar building!
Platinum Supporting Member
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6,867
Its pretty obvious thats the same amp used in both those solos. Do you need an entire rig rundown or can you trust your ears for once?
A live signal chain "rig rundown" would be fun, if you can provide one. Were they touring with an XL-4 perchance?
Thanks!
 

Robert Libutti

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,288
Keep in mind that Mssr. Syke's guitar signal, very likely, passed through one heck of a lot of processing/modifying before it reached your ears.
It is extraordinarily common/standard procedure with big rock tracks to "carve" the various instrumental tracks in order that they sit in the band mix appropriately and...if we could listen to the final treatment on a given guitar track...it is often rather unappealing on it's own.

And so it can be hard to say just how that amp sounded out there on the studio floor....
As an example...
 

MantraSky

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,335
Bob Rock was very instrumental in helping John along with Mesa and Jose modded Marshall’s, W/D setup, delays etc. though I’ve heard that the Jose modded Marshall’s were once owned by Steve Vai. Most of John’s Still of the Night Whitesnake sound was from the engineering.

Great Rock guitarist......
 




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