Jumbo guitar needs some work

Discussion in 'Acoustic Instruments' started by ghoti, Feb 16, 2009.

  1. ghoti

    ghoti Member

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    Jul 15, 2007
    Location:
    Mill Valley, CA
    I recently got an Ibanez artwood style jumbo acoustic guitar. It's pretty thrashed and needs at minimum a fret job and probably a new nut.

    I'm wondering if anyone has some advice for who I should go to and a ballpark figure for how much it would cost to do this work. I live just north of San Francisco.

    The guitar sounds great but needs a good bit of work. At minimum, it needs fretwork and probably a new nut. Also, the pegs near the bridge might be replaced, the pickguard is missing, and if possible I'd like to have the space between the strings widened. The fishman pickup is also barely adequate and might need some fixing...

    The closest person near me who can do this stuff seems to be Eric Schoenberg ( www.om28.com ). Does anyone have any other recommendations and/or experience?
     
  2. ghoti

    ghoti Member

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    Uh...anyone? Bueller?
     
  3. David Collins

    David Collins Member

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    Location:
    Ann Arbor, MI
    Frank ford is just south of the Bay in Palo Alto. Regardless who you go to though, if you're looking at a refret, new nut, then bridge pin damage normally meansbridge plate work is needed, pickguard, maybe new pickup, and other unexpected things that usually come with a beaten up Ibanez, I'd say you should be expecting $400-$600 estimate at least, plus another hundred or two for a new pickup system if you want it.

    A lot of money to put in to an old Ibanez. It's why I often call them "disposable guitars". It's not to suggest that they're not great while they last, but simply that most owners can't justify investing more in the normal maintenance and repair than the instrument is worth. So of course they often end up getting retired as campfire guitars, and replaced for less than it would cost to maintain.
     

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