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Just a reminder linseed oil can spontaneously catch on fire

Malinoski

everything wrong possible
Messages
2,138
Absolutely, I know a couple of painters who almost set their studios on fire because they left oily rags in a pile.

I use paper towels with linseed finish and lay them out to dry before throwing them in the trash.
 

donnievaz

Member
Messages
3,563
Maphtha obviously, but its a good reminder
I can check but I think Tru-oil also has a warning on it.
All of the finishing oils are capable of it. I always drape them over something and let them dry completely before tossing. You could even hang them from a line like the old time clotheslines. As long as they're not balled up and can breathe while they're drying they're OK.
 

satilight

Member
Messages
127
If drying them, it is best to do it outside. I know of an incident where a gunsmith and shell reloader was putting linseed oil on a gunstock in a sunroom and left for a coffee. The house was in a crowded area. The fire department couldn't get near it until it burned to the ground with area damage and many lawsuits. Was great fireworks though.
 

EADGBE

Senior Member
Messages
12,338
All of the finishing oils are capable of it. I always drape them over something and let them dry completely before tossing. You could even hang them from a line like the old time clotheslines. As long as they're not balled up and can breathe while they're drying they're OK.
They could catch on fire drying on a line and then catch the line on fire. The best way to discard oil soaked rags is to wet them with water. Then put them in a jar with more water. And then put the lid on and throw away.
 

mrmatt1972

Member
Messages
1,534
It's the crumpling of the rag that promotes the spontaneous combustion. Any oil based finishing product, and many that are filled with thinners will also cause spontaneous combustion. Wring the rags out and hang them on a line and you're OK. The water filled disposal pail is an even better solution.
 

beb

Member
Messages
95
They could catch on fire drying on a line and then catch the line on fire. The best way to discard oil soaked rags is to wet them with water. Then put them in a jar with more water. And then put the lid on and throw away.
And then nuke them from outerspace.
 

guitarcapo

Senior Member
Messages
2,326
If you polish shellac with steel wool.... and a lot of shellac and oil builds up in the steel wool it can also spontaneously catch fire....and it won't go out if you step on it or douse it with water.
 

Malinoski

everything wrong possible
Messages
2,138
They could catch on fire drying on a line and then catch the line on fire. The best way to discard oil soaked rags is to wet them with water. Then put them in a jar with more water. And then put the lid on and throw away.
Stop, not true.
If they are in a pile there is potential for spontaneous combustion, but if they are separated to dry they will be fine.

Tru Oil too? Wow...thanks for the warning:bonk
Tru oil is linseed based,
not magic mojo fluid like so many want to think- linseed.
Don't waste your money.
 

DGTCrazy

Mod Squad
Staff member
Messages
16,168
As a Fire Investigator.......Linseed Oil was a pain in the butt to deal with, as people knew it could spontaneously catch the rags they used on fire.......so we really had to dig deep to see if there was "intent" or not. Usually.......a new or recent majorly increased Insurance Policy, coupled with financial issues told the true story.

FWIW: OSHA:1926.252(e)

All solvent waste, oily rags, and flammable liquids shall be kept in fire resistant covered containers until removed from worksite.



Otherwise.....I'd just lay the rags out in a safe are, one by one in their own space until they "cure" (become hardened).
 

John Coloccia

Cold Supporting Member
Messages
9,584
Just FYI, because I don't want to rehash the whole thread, but the only oils that spontaneously combust are "drying" oils, and predominantly boiled linseed oil. Naphtha doesn't...nor does acetone, mineral spirits, lacquer thinner, shellec (which is alcohol based) etc etc. They can combust, but they won't spontaneously combust because there is no chemical reaction taking place, and therefore no heat buildup.

Here's an interesting one. CA glue and cotton....cotton balls especially (lots of surface area). Things could get very messy very quickly if you use cotton swabs for doing things (like applying lacquer for spot touch ups), and then happen to dump a bunch of CA in the trash can trying to clear a clogged tip. Look out. :)

Generally, I take my rags/towels that have BLO on them, spritz them with water and toss them in the driveway under a couple of rocks. They're dry by the next day and out in the trash they go.
 

sunburst79

Member
Messages
1,329
How many time have heard about people using linseed oil poo-pooing the guys that use lemon oil or whatever on their fingerboards. I think I'll stick with the lemon oil.

My grandfather used to make hs own house paint and primer and this isn't news to me. But it's nice to have a reminder. I'm not sure there's ANYthing I need linseed oil for these days but I will start reading directions a bit more as I have gotten a bit lax in my old age.


John are you saying CA reacts with lacquer?
 






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