Just got a Little Big Muff :)

GenghisBomb

Member
Messages
176
Oh boy! I have been back into playing electric guitar after a long layoff, and despite being a bit of a "magpie" in terms of guitars, my amp purchases have been *rock* solid. I got a Marshall DSL5 tube combo, a Traynor YGL15 tube combo, and a Positive Grid Spark modelling amp.

I tend to play the three roughly equally, but find the Traynor can't do really high gain at the volumes I can play it at. So I wanted to get a distortion pedal. But I wanted something different. So I grabbed a Big Muff at the local shop, and tried it out. Amazing. Game changing. Loved it. I decided to think it over a bit, as I have a bit of gear on payments right now, but then someone had a used one for sale locally for under half price, so I grabbed it.

Brought it home, grabbed the Traynor, and my Ibanez RG w/EMG's. Oh man. Just the most buttery tone ever. It's like this pedal was my RG's long lost soul mate. I just recently bought a Joyo Phase, and I can't *wait* to try both together :)

I wrote a cool little song skeleton during my first session, and was amazed at the tonal variety you get with the Tone and Sustain knobs on the LBM. How can they make these things in the US and sell them for that price?!

Any other Big Muff fans on here, and any tips for songs to learn that use it?
 

cram

Member
Messages
14,210
Playing in a live setting you may find pairing it with a mid hump on an eq pedal. This is what I used to do with a little big muff. I wound up moving to a barber trifecta for these tones as it has some contour, adjustment in this area.
That thick tone in addition to the amp you're working with should work well.
 

John Mark Painter

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
14,310
The big tip is that to use it in a live setting, your amp has to ‘have some place left to go’ before you hit the Muff. Otherwise it seems to go down in volume.

I have always used clean/light crunch when digging in amp settings and they work great like that
 

GenghisBomb

Member
Messages
176
I am primarily a "bedroom player", can you explain why the Mid boost is helpful? Does the Muff cause you to get lost in the mix?
 

John Mark Painter

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
14,310
Playing at home you’ll be fine.
Big muffs have mid scoops.
Different version have different scoops….then combined with your guitar, amp and what else is going on, it can make you drop in the mix.

That can also be a GOOD thing as it allows you to create a big bed of guitar while leaving space for vocals. (We aren’t always supposed to cut through the mix!).

Running a Rat with its gain all the way down, or an EQ with a low cut, or a Klon/Tube screamer etc before Big Nuff all work great for clearing it up and boosting for leads.

A Rangemaster before Big Muff is a classic for lead boost as well.
 

GenghisBomb

Member
Messages
176
The big tip is that to use it in a live setting, your amp has to ‘have some place left to go’ before you hit the Muff. Otherwise it seems to go down in volume.

I have always used clean/light crunch when digging in amp settings and they work great like that
I really like the response I am getting on the neck PU (EMG 85). I love the warm subtle gain it gives. The Traynor just seems to *drink* it up, if that makes sense!
 

Jess 1971

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
4,474
I am primarily a "bedroom player", can you explain why the Mid boost is helpful? Does the Muff cause you to get lost in the mix?
Yes, very much so. Muffs are notoriously difficult to use in live band situations because your guitar will typically disappear in the mix even at high volumes.

A common solution is to use a Muff in conjunction with an EQ pedal, or to simply get a Muff with an added mids control, like such:

rs=w:400,cg:true
 




Top Bottom