Just ordered "Hybrid Picking for Guitar" by Gustavo Assis-Brasil

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by dorfmeister, Apr 30, 2008.

  1. dorfmeister

    dorfmeister Member

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    Just ordered this last night.

    Anybody else using this book?

    Any tips on how you are approaching it?
     
  2. jimfog

    jimfog Senior Member

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    I've got it, but have had a hard time really biting into it. The 1st half is almost all permutations of RH possibilities, on open strings........so it's pretty ZEN......lol.

    I think it will get you where you want to go......but it's gonna be a laborious process.....which is probably how it needs to be.
     
  3. GovernorSilver

    GovernorSilver Member

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    Yes, I use it. I've posted my progress with it on the "What have you accomplished today..." thread.
     
  4. Noah

    Noah Member

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    I have the book, and have to agree with jimfog. The first half if pretty dull stuff, and requires more discipline than I have at this time. It does have some cool pieces to learn, but I haven't had much success in building up to them.
     
  5. GovernorSilver

    GovernorSilver Member

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    I originally approached it as a progressive lesson book. Then someone else's comment that it was akin to the Sheets Of Sound books influenced a change in my approach. I picked two pieces from the end of the book to learn and have been working on those two ever since.

    I get the most satisfaction out of having a piece of music to work on, and then referring back to the appropriate exercise(s) to fix technical problems.

    If you have very little previous hybrid picking or fingerpicking experience like I did, a month working the open string picking-hand drills might be in order for you, before tackling anything that requires both hands. I don't think an excessive amount of time spent on them before playing anything else int he book is necessary. Just a month spent on these open-string drills, with a metronome and that metronome set to a slow tempo, may save you headaches down the road, because you'll have given your picking hand a chance to get some of the coordination down. I personally experienced difficulty at the very beginning in hybrid picking with any right-hand pattern that was not a straight up pick-m-a-c, or straight down c-a-m-pick pattern. Anything that required fingers to pick "out of sequence", like a pinky(c) note followed by a middle finger(m) note, was trouble. These open string drills fixed that.
     
  6. dorfmeister

    dorfmeister Member

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    How effective do you think these drills would be in developing fingerstyle technique as well?

    I would like to try them both with the pick and without.
     
  7. GovernorSilver

    GovernorSilver Member

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    If you substitute your index finger or thumb for the pick, they should be usable, and Assis-Brasil says so in the book, as I recall. He cites his classical guitar training as a source for his book, and thus many of the open-string drills may be familiar to someone with classical guitar training.

    The main purpose of these drills is to get your picking fingers comfortable with picking patterns other than straight-up/straight-down rolls.
     
  8. Mita

    Mita Member

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  9. Sunbreak Music

    Sunbreak Music Member

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    I have it. I didn't really like most of the "etudes" presented, but it will get you started.

    I'm an acoustic guitarist for the most part, so I really just wanted to get the pick in there. ;-)

    I wouldn't use it as a guide to fingerpicking.
     
  10. GovernorSilver

    GovernorSilver Member

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    You mean the compositions at the end of the book?

    There's one country-pickin' piece and two or so that sound like classical guitar pieces as people would expect them to be, but the others are more "abstract", in that you can hear the influence of Wayne Krantz (one of Assis-Brasil's teachers) and others who are into a more cerebral style of writing and playing. So I can understand why some might not find some of the pieces to their tastes.
     
  11. Sunbreak Music

    Sunbreak Music Member

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    Yeah--I'm more into the Brett Garsed or Shawn Lane "sound" (also Eric Johnson) when it comes to hybrid picking. Something very wide and intervallic sounding, but fairly straightforward from rock or jazz rock perspective.

    So I guess you're right. :D
     
  12. drfrankencopter

    drfrankencopter Member

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    My left hand gets bored with the 1st 1/2 of the book, so when I practice those exercises I also pull out a copy of chord chemistry and find 6-string chords to play with the left hand at the same time. At least that makes it a bit more musical. I think the payoffs are long-term with this book. It's a method/regime rather than a collection of 'tricks'. I wish he'd spent more time describing the physical technique though...it's pretty thin in that regard.

    Cheers

    Kris
     
  13. GovernorSilver

    GovernorSilver Member

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    IMO, that first half is for developing the motor skills for hybrid picking with string skipping, as well as getting comfortable using the pinky. You'll need the string skipping ability if you want to hybrid pick lines with big interval jumps like Brett Garsed.

    And if you want to play anything outside of 4/4 time, some of the drills are in odd meters. After working this stuff for a while, I found myself coming up with odd-meter arpeggiated parts for our band's songs, just like Adam Jones' guitar parts for many Tool songs.

    If you get bored, I see nothing wrong with jumping ahead to the Jazz Lines section or even the Compositions section, then revisiting the simpler, more focused drills when you feel overwhelmed. Just don't cheat yourself by not using a metronome, on a slow setting at the beginning.
     
  14. theohartman

    theohartman Member

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    this book helped my right hand immensely. as did sheets of sound. mostly, because i'd ignored my right hand. when i get bored, i treat them as alternate-picking exercises....

    i hear the wk too.
     
  15. dorfmeister

    dorfmeister Member

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    I've decided to, for the most part, lose the pick and I have been using these exercises to develop my fingerpicking.

    Great stuff.
     
  16. dorfmeister

    dorfmeister Member

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  17. dorfmeister

    dorfmeister Member

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    Just ordered the second book in the series.
     
  18. GovernorSilver

    GovernorSilver Member

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    Not yet. Still haven't mastered all the material in the first book. At the very least, I want to learn all the compositions.
     
  19. rhythmrocker

    rhythmrocker 1966 Battle of the Bands Supporting Member

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    Just got the book - I won't ever abandon the pick though - I could never play Miserlou if I did![​IMG]
     
  20. GovernorSilver

    GovernorSilver Member

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    Just received my copy of Hybrid Picking Exercises: Single Note Permutations, then remembered this thread existed.

    As the title implies, the book focuses on permutations of the left hand fingers on frets combined with permutations the right hand fingers on strings. It's like he took the classic "permutations of 1234" exercise and made it 2-dimensional.

    The author's argument for practicing permutation exercises: Inspiration for new musical ideas and less dependency on "muscle memory" when you improvise.

    This book is intended to be a supplement to the original Hybrid Picking For Guitar book. That book remains the best overall book I've seen for introducing hybrid picking technique to guitarists with zero background in fingerstyle playing (like me). The Single Note Permutations book focuses strictly on one topic, with almost 60 pages of short exercises followed by longer ones.

    One thing I noticed about the original book is the leap in difficulty from the "Hybrid Picking Exercises" section to the "Lines" and "Compositions" sections. The phrases in the Lines section sound great in the included CD, but require a lot of coordination between the left and right hands. For example, the first phrase uses this right-hand pattern: Pmca PcPm cmPc Pmcm PcPma (P=pick, c=pinky, m=middle, a=ring), with lots of skips of 1-2 strings; and the left hand is active too, because the line uses triads of C and Gb. The newer book appears to fill in this "difficulty level gap" nicely.

    No, getting the Single Note Permutations book doesn't mean I've mastered the original book. Far from it. Admittedly, I still don't improvise much with hybrid picking, but that's not the fault of the book - since I last posted on this thread, I focused more on learning fingerstyle arrangements of pop tunes, and getting better at playing the viola. I still get bored with the idea of "soloing" on guitar, but see the value in coming up with cool riffs and other guitar parts for tunes using hybrid picking.
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2012

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