Just plugged my new 110v amp into 220v.

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs' started by Defendant, Aug 13, 2019.

  1. Defendant

    Defendant Member

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    So I got a s/h Brunetti Pleximan in new condition.

    The seller warned me that it was a 110V model -I live in a 230V country, but I have a step down transformer already for my '66 Showman.

    A few days pass before i can take my head home ...and I forget and plug it straight into the wall.

    The pilot light lit up for less than a second. And that was that. No prolonged death, smoke or the like.

    I looked at the fuse and it seemed intact. I've yet to to go get replacements.

    What's the likelihood I've fried something under the hood?

    /kicking myself
     
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  2. RAG7890

    RAG7890 Member

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    When I was the dealer in Australia for a major brand, ex the USA, I had several numb nuts buy their Amps direct ex USA to save not much money.

    Cool, it’s a free market, do as you wish. Well they plugged their USA only Power Transformers in to our 240V Outlets & stuffed their Amps.

    When they requested a Warranty Repair, I said “I don’t think so”. I actually made a little money selling Power Transformers.

    Anyway, I just had to tell that story because it’s funny.

    On a serious note, you have potentially damaged your Power Transformer, that is usually what happens.

    If it is not a Vintage Amp, it is not a big deal as you can buy a replacement & it is a quick & easy job to change it over assuming you have access to a good, competent Amp Tech.

    Where are you based?

    :beer

    P.S. My preamble wasn’t meant for you, as you have bought a 2nd hand Amp. :)
     
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  3. Tootone

    Tootone Member

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    Check the fuse with a multi-meter first... if you get 0.00 ohms you fried the amp.

    If it say 100 MegaOhms .... open circuit... replace the fuse. Try again with the stepdown this time.
     
    Defendant likes this.
  4. jdel77

    jdel77 Member

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    Yeah maybe the fuse took the hit.
    1. Plug it into the stepdown correctly and try it.
    2. Replace the fuse and try it again, with the step down.
    3. Take it to a tech to measure the power transformer voltages.
     
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  5. Defendant

    Defendant Member

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    Yeah I bought it with eyes open. Problem was I forgot.

    I'm in Vietnam, so that makes service a bit more difficult.
     
  6. PurpleJesus

    PurpleJesus Jimi actually wrote Wind Cries Mary about me Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Check the fuse before you do anything else. There's a good chance you got lucky and that's the only issue.
     
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  7. 67super

    67super Member

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    Do any of the tube filaments light up? Did you take the amp off standby? Hopefully the fuse blew and protected things.
     
  8. FourT6and2

    FourT6and2 Member

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    You sent 230v into a 110v PT. So you potentially just doubled the voltage coming out of the secondary. That means if your B+ is normally like 400v, it went up to 800v for a split second. That definitely exceeds the rating on your filter caps and other components. So who knows what happened. Maybe the fuse saved it. Maybe not. You'll have to dig into the amp to find out.
     
    Defendant likes this.
  9. Jabberwocky

    Jabberwocky Member

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    'Tis safer under the bridge.
    The power supply fuse would be the first to go. I don't think anything else is burnt out. Check the fuse. It is in a black round receptacle marked HT Fuse on the back panel of the amp. You have to turn it 90 degrees counterclockwise to make it pop out.

    If the excess voltage had got past the fuse the electrolytic power supply capacitors would blow up spectacularly. You will KNOW for sure when they do. Not subtle. Change the HT fuse and plug it into a stepdown transformer rated for it. Don't use one of those travel transformers.
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2019
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  10. Defendant

    Defendant Member

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    Thx guys.

    Brunetti support got back to me as well -they say change the fuse and try again. Will do tonight. Wish me luck!
     
  11. Roe

    Roe Member

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    fuse, tubes, filter caps and power transformer could all blow
     
  12. Ed DeGenaro

    Ed DeGenaro Supporting Member

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    Watched this numerous times on power amps, amps and consoles. When overanxious assistants forget to flip the fuse carrier and put the right value.
    Only issue ever were blown fuses.
    And if it's a slo-blo it's hard to tell if they're fried unless you meter test them.
     
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  13. hitchcaster

    hitchcaster Member

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    after you figure it out.. i'd consider getting a new PT from mercury for 230v.. the amp will sound better then using the step down trannie.. and of course you can't do what you did again.
     
    braveheart likes this.

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