Just Scored a Supro Dual-Tone!

DrumBob

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
18,286
I just scored a Supro Dual-Tone, a guitar I have wanted forever, for $230 bucks less than another one sold for on E-Prey last night. It's in good shape, needs a nut, a setup, and a little electronics work. It's white, all original except for the selector switch, and I'm totally psychd to get it.

I have been lusting for one of these babies for years and years.
 

9fingers

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
7,811
Got one- very cool! Talk about a FAT bridge pup tone. A great freight train tone for slide with some OD!
 

DrumBob

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
18,286
I have no clue how to pist pics here. I don't have the guitar yet.
 

nmiller

Drowning in lap steels
Messages
6,938
Great guitar, at an even better price! Is it the solidbody version or the hollow fiberglass version?
 

DrumBob

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
18,286
It's the wooden solidbody version. I didn't think they made them in fiberglass. I'll email you a pic after I get it.
 

SUPROficial

Member
Messages
422
I didn't think they made them in fiberglass.
They did, starting in '63.
I used to have a wood bodied Dual-Tone, currently have the fiberglass version. They're somewhat different animals tone-wise. Different feeling necks (the fiberglass guitars had 'zero frets'), too.

This is my Dual-Tone, the bigger Supro behind it is a '65 Martinique.

 

simonm

Member
Messages
1,017
this one?


This is the best version of the Dual Tone IMO - with the early neck-body joint as well as the the screws, it will be rock solid! Congrats! You can get a NOS pickup selector on eeb also.
 

SUPROficial

Member
Messages
422
This is the best version of the Dual Tone
I would very strongly disagree with that statement.

with the early neck-body joint as well as the the screws, it will be rock solid!
No more so than the later ones. The earlier wood bodied Supro neck joints could even be said to be less "rock solid" since there's only one screw holding the neck to the body (the "res-o-glas" versions have two), the other one screw is the tilt adjustment.
 

simonm

Member
Messages
1,017
I would very strongly disagree with that statement.


No more so than the later ones. The earlier wood bodied Supro neck joints could even be said to be less "rock solid" since there's only one screw holding the neck to the body (the "res-o-glas" versions have two), the other one screw is the tilt adjustment.
disagree if you like, it's allowed.

this '58 effectively has two joints - so it's the most solid of all the Valco designs IMO.





http://cgi.ebay.com/RARE-1958-VINTAGE-SUPRO-DUAL-TONE-ELECTRIC-GUITAR-NR_W0QQitemZ160389622444QQcmdZViewItemQQptZGuitar?hash=item2557f76aac
 
Last edited:

SUPROficial

Member
Messages
422
this '58 effectively has two joints - so it's the most solid of all the Valco designs IMO.
You are completely and thoroughly mistaken, sir.
Only the top screw is a neck/body joint fastener. The second one is the neck tilt adjustment screw, it doesn't "hold" anything.

The later (fiberglass) versions amended this by connecting the neck with two screws (they kept the tilt adjustment in between them). Therefore the earliest version is most certainly not the "most solid" Valco design. You can knock the neck out of alignment if you bump it, I know because I've done it a few times.
Can't do that with the later ones, they're far more solid where the neck/body joint is concerned.
I have several specimens of both varieties, so I think I am in a position to make an informed comparison between the two neck joint types.

See for yourself if you think this is simply "my opinion" - fiberglass on the left, wood bodied on the right:

 
Last edited:

nmiller

Drowning in lap steels
Messages
6,938
You can knock the neck out of alignment if you bump it, I know because I've done it a few times.
Having owned and played both types of neck joint, I can say with confidence that you'd have to violently smash the guitar against the floor before either neck will be knocked out of alignment, unless something is wrong with your guitar. I have a National with a single-screw joint, and the joint is every bit as solid as a Fender-type arrangement.
 

SUPROficial

Member
Messages
422
Having owned and played both types of neck joint, I can say with confidence that you'd have to violently smash the guitar against the floor before either neck will be knocked out of alignment, unless something is wrong with your guitar. I have a National with a single-screw joint, and the joint is every bit as solid as a Fender-type arrangement.
The first Valco guitar I ever purchased was a 50s wood bodied Dual-Tone. A previous owner had buggered up the pickup mounting rings so that there was no way to lower the pickups and the neck angle had to be adjusted quite high for string clearance. Until the pickup rings were replaced and the neck angle was reduced, the neck would creak audibly when handled and was pretty easy to move out of alignment. The early neck joint relies on the neck angle being fairly conservative for a solid fit. If it is adjusted too high, the rear of the neck pocket no longer holds the neck in position and allows the neck to pivot slightly on the one screw holding it to the body, and the range of play for a "correct" neck angle is somewhat narrow.
The later design allows for a greater range of possible neck angles.
 

simonm

Member
Messages
1,017
I missed the further action on this thread, and I'm not bringing it back to be awkward, I just want to understand better and explain my extravagant claims.

SUPROficial (I guess that's you zak/Ed?): when you say "I have several specimens of both varieties, so I think I am in a position to make an informed comparison between the two neck joint types."
I know the difference between these two, there's a third type - when I refer to the 'early' joint, I mean the one that came before the one on the right - this type:

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4029/4274287132_9e1b298504.jpg



The first ('55?) small body Dual Tones have this joint, and the earliest larger-body-without-german-carve DTs have it, then they have this joint combined with the single screw from the back (+ tilt screw) - that's what the one in the auction has, as far as I can tell. I played one like this in a store last year, but obviously I couldn't take it apart to see how it works, so I am not sure. But that's what I mean when I say it's the most solid design.

Am I still totally wrong? I know it's a possibility (heh!)
Maybe DrumBob has got his guitar now and can comment? I'm still jealous anyway.

About neck stability - in my experience the earlier single screw fixing Valcos have a deeper neck pocket, so they are v stable. From around 1960 (?) the pocket becomes much shallower and so the single screw doesn't do such a good job of holding the neck in place.
 

jackthecat37

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
286
This is like the neck joint on the one I just bought off ebeigh. The angle needs adjusting. At the moment the bridge is too high to keep it from fretting out. I've been trying to find info on how to do it.
54 National:
 

simonm

Member
Messages
1,017
Nice gtrr - that model is the Cosmopolitan - I don't think I've seen one with two of the vinyl-covered pickups before though.

The bad news is that neck is not adustable - the only adjustment you have is at the bridge. Mine would have been much like yours but with the MOTS finish, but I got it without the pickguard, bridge or tailpiece. I've put a Valco pickup at the bridge and worked on the pickguard since this pic:



Head over to the Valco Forum for more info /second opinions:
http://www.kilback.net/cgi-bin/ikonboard.cgi
 




Trending Topics

Top