Katrina...Louisiana

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by zzmoore, Feb 23, 2015.

  1. zzmoore

    zzmoore Member

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    Man.....did any of you Guys/Gals get caught up in this mess.?
    I truly hope you have recovered.

    My boss had almost 9 feet of water in his house. A few weeks later, it (his house) was a vacant lot.
    He had just had a bunch of antiques moved there for storage. He had flood insurance, but the insurance company said it was not a flood that ruined his home, it was a hurricane.
    some random.......https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Kou0HBpX4A
     
  2. MrGretsch

    MrGretsch Member

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    Dude, that was a decade ago. And Insurance companies were sued for the behaviour you describe. Try to stay up-to-date, will ya?
     
  3. DGDGBD

    DGDGBD Member

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    nice
     
  4. TeleBlack

    TeleBlack Senior Member

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    I do not support this reply. What's wrong with revisiting things 10 years later? Boo @ you.
     
  5. lostpoet2

    lostpoet2 Supporting Member

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    I hope someone bumps this in 10 years.
     
  6. AdrenalinJunkie

    AdrenalinJunkie Silver Supporting Member

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    I can tell you that in Pensacola, we're +/- from NOLA, and we were without power for several days. It was nasty here. And we were only a year removed from Ivan, which devastated the area.
    [​IMG]
    This is I-10 over Escambia Bay.
    [​IMG]
    Pensacola Beach. If you haven't had to contend with a hurricane, It, ain't fun.
     
  7. Craig Walker

    Craig Walker WHO DAT!! Gold Supporting Member

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    August is the 10 year anniversary. So the thread is appropriate.

    And in so far as "And Insurance companies were sued for the behaviour you describe."

    I have *MANY* friends who never got a dime. They paid/are paying mortgage on a flat slab. My brother-in-law had 30+ houses in his neighborhood. Six were left standing [his was ok]

    That's me seeing what had happened for the first time, the next morning. I felt like me knees were going to crumble. There were houses there to the far edge of that tree line, which is the beach.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Zero rebuilt. Zero.

    Before you reprimand someone, know of what you speak.

    Some other pix:

    My in-laws, trying to help those who lost everything get clothes to go to a hotel or wherever.

    [​IMG]

    The house I grew up in:

    [​IMG]

    The red arrow is our old house. Now multiply that strip of destruction times 30+ miles:

    [​IMG]

    The church I was married in, has a nice open feel:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Craig Walker

    Craig Walker WHO DAT!! Gold Supporting Member

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    Oh, and btw, ground zero for the storm was Bay St. Louis Ms.

    Not New Orleans.

    People here get their feathers ruffled when you say "we experienced Katrina" and then that's followed with "Oh, you live in New Orleans?!"
     
  9. schmidlin

    schmidlin Member

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    I participated in a mission trip to NO about a month after Katrina (basically, we mucked-out houses). And rolling into a major American city around 10 PM and seeing it lit only by moonlight is something I will NEVER forget.
     
  10. Sidney Vicious

    Sidney Vicious Silver Supporting Member

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    Craig - your pictures bring back some painful memories.

    I drove around a bunch in the early days in New Orleans - before the perimeter was secured and then as soon as water receded in an area I ignored the evacuation orders and went in - and saw stuff I don't forget - Lakeview, New Orleans East, Ninth Ward, etc., but was too humbled to photograph anything beyond my house and office - my office was flooded and the house hit hard but was not flooded.

    I felt dirty - like a scavenger - a ghoul - in a weird way - when I stopped and thought of photographing some of the stuff I saw.

    I am glad that photojournalists and others did otherwise.
     
  11. Tbone135

    Tbone135 Member

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    We sheltered about 150 refugees from New Orleans in our church when Katrina happened. One of the most surreal experiences of my life was sitting down with families and taking a map to help them find a new place to live. So many folks had never left New Orleans and never wanted to.
     
  12. EricPeterson

    EricPeterson Member

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    Craig, thank you for sharing those pictures.
     
  13. Trebor Renkluaf

    Trebor Renkluaf I was hit by a parked car, what's your excuse? Gold Supporting Member

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    We adopted a pup in August of 2006 that was a Katrina rescue.
     
  14. AdrenalinJunkie

    AdrenalinJunkie Silver Supporting Member

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    I know so many bad stories made the news, stories of people hoarding and price gouging. But after Ivan, while our neighborhood was without power for nearly 2 weeks, I fired up the grill and cooked for the whole street, and the neighbors brought frozen food from their freezers since without power everything was thawing.
     
  15. playsarobin

    playsarobin Results. Not excuses.

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    Ivan, Katrina, Rita and Ike.

    None compared to the impact of Katrina, but all have very distinct memories for me. We're inbetween beaumont and Houston and dealt with, helped, got taken advantage by, and still have many friends and know great people who evacuated or were forced out after losing everything during Katrina.

    Katrina. It's going to take a long time before that is simply another name. Much like 'Allison' in our area. Memories and lasting affect will linger for ages.

    Craig, Sydney, anyone else that dealt with it first hand, I wouldn't wish what little I know of the experience on anyone. I've helped clear my share of debris, trees, animals, etc and its stuff you never forget. Everyone instantly becomes equal and simply puts their hands to the plow to help everyone just make it through.

    It's a mental and emotional disaster as much as it is natural and physical.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  16. Boris Bubbanov

    Boris Bubbanov Member

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    You know it.

    Waveland (next to Bay St. Louis) was annihilated.

    Had the Storm hit New Orleans directly instead of Waveland/Bay St. Louis, the death toll would have been 70,000 souls. New Orleans did get a break, actually.

    Another group of people who were totally ignored were those in St. Bernard Parish. Rescue groups would come in to the New Orleans headed for Arabi or Meraux or Chalmette and find people in peril in New Orleans and never make it to St. Bernard.

    I would say due to Camille, the people in Hancock (County where Bay St. Louis, Pass Christian are) were better prepared and understood better where to go and when to leave. 9.5 years later, vast numbers of people in New Orleans and Jefferson have no idea what direction to go or how to subsist anywhere but New Orleans. The average New Orleanian, does not travel except by tour bus to a football game or they get on an airplane to Las Vegas. They'd flunk the entrance exam to the Boy Scouts if you know what I mean. North? Upstream? The fishermen and hunters know this stuff; the lady at the dry cleaners just doesn't.

    The irony of all of this is, the average denizen of New Orleans is even less prepared for the next one than prior to Katrina. Used to be, I could go to parties in New Orleans and we'd have debate about the peril we were in and lots of offers of refuge were exchanged between friends and neighbors. If your house is destroyed, please come stay with my aunt and uncle in Ridgeland, MS or in Vidalia, LA. Those kinds of connections seem to me to be severed now, in so many cases. If you "Speak Truth" about the circumstances in New Orleans and the risk, you don't attend parties with the "Deniers". "Deniers" think it is extremely bad form to discuss hurricane preparations or the risk of living in NOLA. And frankly, the "Speak Truth" people have to a considerable extent either left on their own or been run out of town. Clients fall away; phone calls are not returned - emails are ignored. And those who remain are on average simply not interested in the subject - they're just sick to death of it.
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2015
  17. Craig Walker

    Craig Walker WHO DAT!! Gold Supporting Member

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    Very true. You suddenly realize all that matters, and it ain't 'stuff'.

    Yes. "Normal" took a while.
     
  18. Boris Bubbanov

    Boris Bubbanov Member

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    I hear that.

    People think if you don't have any scratches or broken bones, you're gonna be fine.

    But I have never, ever been so humiliated as the way I felt looking around at the stinking, stinking, filthy wreckage of all the possessions I had left behind (which was virtually everything).

    I'd made several trips to the FL coast after Ivan but before Katrina and I thought I understood what a hit to New Orleans might be like. I was still totally blindsided by how deeply this kind of event hurts a person. I'm simply not the same person I was before this storm. I didn't handle this loss anywhere near the way I imagined I could.

    +

    Sometimes it is suggested those to the East who simply had all their things swept clean away, were better off in the long run. All the time you spend screwing around, trying to restore life to virtually destroyed buildings and personal possessions, is just bad for the soul. The quandary, of what to do with a virtually destroyed, framed photograph of a long dead girlfriend, where the only time you can make out her image is late late at night, after drinking 4 or more glasses of wine? It is a curse. Better to have just lost it once and for all on the day of the Storm.
     
  19. Jackie Treehorn

    Jackie Treehorn Member

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    St Bernard parish, I believe, was 100% wiped out which makes it unique. The Canadian Mounties were the first to arrive there and most homeowners owned their homes outright which meant that was their entire savings lost.
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2015
  20. Boris Bubbanov

    Boris Bubbanov Member

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    St. Bernard had both blessings and terrible loss.

    The first thing is, the average family there was a giant, spread out Extended family of maybe 18 residences and 55 members, roughly. With an average of 3 family owned businesses entirely leveled. Wiped out.

    By tradition St. Bernard residents were closely knit to one another and didn't have cousins in California and New Hampshire and so forth.

    But these families realized immediately if they could act as a team, they could relocate to St. Tammany Parish and work together and get something going from scratch. These people knew instinctively the USA and the State and the NGOs would stick like magnets to all the hardship (and all the bellyaching) being done in the more accessible Parishes to the west. They knew in advance not to wait for help - that that help would never come or wouldn't be worth the trouble.

    One of the saddest things about Katrina was people in Orleans and Jefferson Parishes being told to expect that Society and Government would make them whole. That was actually a really dirty trick. One, because even heartfelt promises were just not kept. Two, because people got in the habit of just standing around and waiting and IMO that's just not good for you. And Three, because when you rebuild you need to OWN the result. If someone else propped you up, you feel obligated. You feel like a supplicant, a beggar.
     

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