Keep?... Sell?... Keep?... Sell?

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by BillyK, Mar 1, 2006.


  1. BillyK

    BillyK Supporting Member

    Messages:
    2,583
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2004
    Location:
    MD
    I've got a little collection of stomps that seem to have survived the test of (at least some) time. While I like the idea of having some "depth on the bench", I am not a real fan of justing keeping gear around - especially if there's very little chance I'll actually use it anytime soon.

    So I go from "think I am gonna sell that" to "nah, think I'll just keep it".

    In some cases, my second string stuff might actually be worth a few bucks, like a Howard Davis-modded DMM, my Zen and Mos combo may get bumped to the bench as well, plus I've got some other benched stuff. So it gets me to thinking, maybe there's something else out there (the act of stomp flipping), or maybe some bucks would be better collected towards other gear, such as a different amp?

    I've owned plenty of stuff that has been sold over the years and I never look back. Guitars seem to be the only thing I've really regretting selling, and that doesn't happen anymore!

    How do you guys navigate this decision??
     
  2. StompBoxBlues

    StompBoxBlues Member

    Messages:
    18,600
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2005
    Location:
    under the stars
    Sounds to me like you've already navigated it :)

    Just reread what you wrote, and I don't see anything in there from you that would indicate you want to keep those pedals.

    I'm almost at the same place, but there are some I keep as backup. Like I have a Deja Mini Vibe, though I like the Mojo Vibe better, the DMV can do a different sound, and in a pinch could get close to the others sound.

    Some OD pedals I like to drag out and retry. The only reason to keep pedals you don't use much are for that once in a great while sound if you record (valid reason), for backup (less valid if you can quickly buy something else in a pinch...since at least in my case I don't drag the backup to gigs and stuff), or because at the moment you can't use them but still love their sound. Maybe the band you are in doesn't do anything that can justify it being on your board.

    Personally, I lose money on reselling pedals usually, so I gotta be pretty sure I don't want that pedal anymore. I sold a CC2 that I kinda had regret pangs over once in a while for a short time, but I got over it.

    Another reason can be a pedal you had/have to wait for months to get.

    Even then, there are no real regrets on pedals. For me amps (I have yet to sell a guitar :)
     
  3. billygoat

    billygoat Member

    Messages:
    356
    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2005
    Location:
    Toronto
    For me, there's only one pedal that can be on the bench, and will never be sold, my original ts-808. Everything else gets traded the minute it comes off the board
     
  4. gitpicker

    gitpicker Silver Supporting Member

    Messages:
    1,466
    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2005
    Location:
    Indianapolis
    If it doesn't fit on my board, it gets sold - period. You can always find another one for the same price later. Look at it this way:

    Lets say you sell a pedal for $200:
    > You flip that money and buy another pedal to check out
    > You don't dig the pedal you just bought, so you sell it and buy another
    > Repeat ad infinitum...

    I average 2-3 pedals per month. Most I don't click with, so I turn them around quickly and keep the pipeline full. There are just too many choices out there to be able to afford (for me at least!) to stockpile unused pedals.

    If you are smart about buying and selling, you can keep your financial losses to a minimum, and even make a couple of bucks here and there. The secret is to buy used, and buy smart. For any given pedal, you will probably be able to find one at a good price that is dead mint, so why buy new when you just want to check something out. The exception to this rule is if you want to check out a pedal that is in very high demand (ie - KOT, ZEN, TIM, TIMMY, etc) that has a waiting list. But those pedals can often be sold for MORE than they cost new!

    There are a few pedals that I have sold and, after "playing the field", have returned to (I have owned 2 COT 50's and 1 FAB 50 for example). But I have alot more confidence in thier ability to stick to my board because I have tried so many other alternatives. In the end, you will have a lot more fun and excitment in your life if you sell off your second string and try out a bunch of new stuff. Odds are, you will probably find a pedal or two that you didn't place high on your priority list but will fall in love with, and never look back!
     
  5. BillyK

    BillyK Supporting Member

    Messages:
    2,583
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2004
    Location:
    MD
    Great freak'in sage advice guys. Two particularly great comments:

    "Just reread what you wrote, and I don't see anything in there from you that would indicate you want to keep those pedals."

    "In the end, you will have a lot more fun and excitment in your life if you sell off your second string and try out a bunch of new stuff."
     
  6. dividedsky

    dividedsky Member

    Messages:
    4,141
    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2005
    Location:
    The Acoustic Guitar Forum
    I buy and sell pedals constantly. Actually, I HAVE to sell constantly in order to keep buying. Right now I am buying and selling an average of 5 pedals a week. I don't keep anything I don't LOVE.
     
  7. derek_32999

    derek_32999 Member

    Messages:
    3,323
    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2005
    Location:
    NC

    Thats me too. :) I am trying to take what I have learned from having VERY expensive gear and trying to find cheaper gear that fits the bill.
     
  8. erksin

    erksin Member

    Messages:
    21,012
    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2004
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    Yeah you do, P!

    My thought is that unless you've got a studio or a particular guitar/amp set-up that LOVES a certain pedal - you should probably keep it. IME - I never dig out the old stuff, there was a reason it got pulled in the first place.
     
  9. BillyK

    BillyK Supporting Member

    Messages:
    2,583
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2004
    Location:
    MD
    Hey erksin,
    Did you mean: "you should probably sell it"?
     
  10. BillyK

    BillyK Supporting Member

    Messages:
    2,583
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2004
    Location:
    MD
    A perfect example of just holding on to stuff, I have a HellBilly that I *like* but it never really makes it to the board for regular use. Since it's a Donnerbox, I hold onto it, but it does kinda fall into that category of "if you're not using it, or likely to use it anytime soon, sell it".
     
  11. otherone

    otherone Supporting Member

    Messages:
    1,155
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2005
    Location:
    New York City
    My solution has been...my benched stuff turned into a smaller second board, and then my more benched stuff turned into a third board. It's actually very cool to have now three boards, all with good stuff, only I have a first string, second string, and third string board. Now, any more benched stuff, and it's gotta go!
     
  12. stratovarius

    stratovarius Supporting Member

    Messages:
    8,964
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2005
    Location:
    Colorado Springs
    Many times I dig out an old pedal to find that it just kills with some new amp or some new combination. Sometimes my tastes or approach has changed and now it fits the bill. I have a hard time letting go.
     
  13. dan-o-guitar

    dan-o-guitar Member

    Messages:
    108
    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Location:
    NoVA
    The buy/keep/sell syndrome is a vicious cycle. Over the last year, it has sucked the life out of me.

    For effects, I have found a solution that is guaranteed:

    Build all your own pedals. It isn't that hard to get into, and the net has schematics and boards for just about every pedal ever made.

    Here is why this approach is effective:

    1. After investing hours and hours of building, debugging and housing your own effects, you have a personal bond with them. Would you sell it? Probably not.

    2. Since it is a home-built effect, you couldn't sell it for much anyway. (Unless you are a world-famous effects builder who retires and then comes back).

    3. As you build, you learn. You learn how to tweak and mod. You can get the exact tone you want instead of buying and selling pedals and taking a loss each time. You stop shaving.

    4. You will spend so much money on parts, tools, meters, scopes, enclosures, paint, wire, components, NOS geranium transistors, etc. that you won't have anything left to spend on guitars and amps. (See how this clever plan actually solves *all* your GAS issues?). At this point, you spend your days in a robe and slippers, no need for clothes since you are a certified pedal builder.

    5. You become pathologically addicted to the smell of solder and heat-shrink tubing. You see schematics for the original Dallas Fuzz Face in your dreams. At work, you spend your time drawing out op-amp digital switches for the ultimate TS-808 clone. Your wife's lovely dining room turns into a mad scientist's lab of failed projects and toxic chemicals.

    6. You stop being concerned about mundane tasks like showers, brushing your teeth, or taking out the trash. Your children start to look at you funny and your dog won't even come near you.

    7. You embark on your dream and go professional. You buy large quantities of parts, get custom PCBs and turn your bedroom into a painting lab complete with chrome plating baths, air compressors, a spraying booth and robotic drill press that can turn out 20 completed enclosures per hour. You hire local high-school kids to hand-solder boards and assemble units. Your wife is press-ganged into service for quality assurance and testing. You pull your kids out of school to support ordering and shipping.

    Of course, my guaranteed approach has only been in testing for a month now, so I'm only on step 3.

    Your mileage may vary.
     
  14. Frethog

    Frethog Member

    Messages:
    1,333
    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2004
    Location:
    Portland, Or USA
  15. drolling

    drolling Member

    Messages:
    6,100
    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2005
    That's been my experience, too.

    And I've seen too many players buy the same pedal over & over as their rig/tastes change. I don't EVER want to be that guy..

    Plus I've taken such a clobbering selling my gear in the past, that I tend to be pretty careful what I buy now.

    Of course, some of the stuff I've bought in the last year I could actually MAKE money on..

    But that runs contradictory to the previous 35 years experience, where I usually recovered a dime on the dollar - only to sometimes see the item selling for 1,000% of its original value a short time later..
     
  16. BillyK

    BillyK Supporting Member

    Messages:
    2,583
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2004
    Location:
    MD
    Dan-o. That was hillarious!
     
  17. dan-o-guitar

    dan-o-guitar Member

    Messages:
    108
    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Location:
    NoVA
    You think that's funny, wait until you see my original pedals:

    Blue Hair Driver: Phaser that randomly slows down and stops. Followed by erratic changes in phase direction. Plus, the knobs are so short, you can't see them over the pedal.

    Wife Cycle: The best overdrive you've ever heard in your life. After about 28 days, thermal build-up in the op-amp leads to nasty self-osciallation and erratic behavior. Then it's back to normal. Pedal life rated at about 40 years at which point most of the boron doping on the transistor has erroded, leaving an unusable effect. But you still keep it for all the great tone it gave you over the years and the fact that it put up with all your ****** playing.

    The W Looper: secretly listens in on all your pedals and arbitrarily changes patch order. When you try and use your multimeter to trace the problem, it automatically re-routes correctly so you never really know the truth. Often mis-pronounces notes. The W circuit is actually passive--all logic is provided by the Cheney chip.

    The eBay Msytique: Basically a TS9 clone with black epoxy goop covering the entire pcb to invoke that mystery Dumble thing. Only visible component is a NOS 12AX7 backlit by a LED. After a limited run of 100, I'll stop production. Expected eBay pricing will hit $1000 per pedal. I haven't yet figured out how I will make money on this.

    The False Bypass: Hark back to your beginner days where you had 20 buffered pedals in a loop and your tone was sucked drier than a cow-bone in the Mojave. This effect is comprised of 12 low-quality buffer stages wired in series. Turn it on and it can suck the chrome off a trailer hitch.

    The Analogger: High-powered DSP with every amp and cab simulation known to man. Perfect fidelity powered by a 20 teraflop processing core built entirely out of electron tubes. Funded by DARPA. Because of the size of the unit, can only be delivered on multiple pallet trucks. May require a zoning ordinance and an EPA waiver.

    Wish me luck.
     
  18. erksin

    erksin Member

    Messages:
    21,012
    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2004
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    Uh, yes...

    :jo
     
  19. BillyK

    BillyK Supporting Member

    Messages:
    2,583
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2004
    Location:
    MD
    Dan-o
    You are kill'in me man. Great stuff. Have you considered doing stand-up for a living?

    Some of the funniest stuff I've read on the gp!!
     
  20. derek_32999

    derek_32999 Member

    Messages:
    3,323
    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2005
    Location:
    NC
    dan-o, I thought I was crazy when I can feel the NEED to solder. Like wanting a cigarette or a beer. It is odd. :BEER
     

Share This Page