Kind of an odd reverb tank question......

Discussion in 'Amps/Cabs Tech Corner: Amplifier, Cab & Speakers' started by guitarcapo, Feb 14, 2012.

  1. guitarcapo

    guitarcapo Senior Member

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    Most of you guys know that you can take four 8 ohm speakers and wire them in a way where the amp sees 8 ohms by taking two pairs in series and wiring them in parallel so you get back to 8 ohms.


    Could you do the same thing with reverb tanks? Have 4 of them wired up so the amp sees the same impedence in the reverb circuit? I'm just curious if reverb tanks work that way. I imagine it would be this cavernous sound but maybe cool as a recording effect or something.
     
  2. Blue Strat

    Blue Strat Member

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    Interesting. The impedance part sounds right. Not sure about the sonic results. Let us know!
     
  3. WaltC

    WaltC Member

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    off the top of my head a major problem would be signal recovery. A single tank system has a tube (or one triode at least) to drive the tank and a tube (or at least one triode) to boost the returned signal and I suspect that you'd have to something similar or the returned signal would be so low that you'd not be able to get much back to mix with the dry signal.

    And even if you could work that out, I expect that you'd have so much "hash" coming back that it would be a real mess and not something desirable.

    Most folks think that Fender's one-tank system it too much if dialed up much past 4 on the dial <G>.
     
  4. Sweetfinger

    Sweetfinger Supporting Member

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    Reverb tank manufacturers have already thought of this and stuffed it inside a single tank,... sort of.
    The classic Fender tank is a "Type 4, 2 spring". Try a Type 9, 3 spring pan. Also, pans come in medium and long decay.
    I certainly think you could drive a couple pans with any conventional circuit. Recovery and noise is going to be where the problems might arise.
     
  5. diagrammatiks

    diagrammatiks Member

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    you wouldn't be able to recovery it very easily at all.
     
  6. Krayon

    Krayon Senior Member

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    I just finished a Super Reverb clone ( a single reverb tank) with a couple of my own tweaks to the reverb circuit for that "Surf Music" type Verb...

    on 2 .. its almost too much..
    and on 7.. wipeout
     
  7. SatelliteAmps

    SatelliteAmps Member

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    You could, and it would work in the same way, but you would have so much reverb it would almost unusable.
     
  8. guitarcapo

    guitarcapo Senior Member

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    I was thinking more of a sound effect.

    As an experiment I have an amp that uses a reverb tank that reads almost the exact same DC resistance on either end of the tank (170 ohms) I'd assume that would mean the same impedence either way. You can actually turn the tank around and still get reverb (although one direction works a little better than the other) These are Hammond Gibbs Reverb tanks and they're used in Magnatone amps among others.

    I figured since they are kind of symmetrical maybe I could combine 2 of them (they use 2 springs each and it might be like a 4 spring tank?)

    Running them in series got no sound. I might try in parallel if I can find same RCA audio cable Y adapters)

    Could be more of a sound effect than anything more.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2012
  9. donnyjaguar

    donnyjaguar Member

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    In most amplifiers if you reduce the dry sound in the reverb circuit it'll sound more cavernous. I think you'll find its often too much though.
     
  10. 900z1

    900z1 Member

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    I can't see the transducer of tank one being strong enough to drive tank 2 in series without a tube in between, even if there were 4 tanks parallel/series giving toe same overall impedance, but I get the point - a reverb on a reverb,

    you may be able to get this kind of effect in cuebase or pro tools quickly without a lot of messing around.
    I know you can completely shut off the dry signal and get the reverb only - sounds like you are coming in a club by the basement door down a long hall etc...
     
  11. teemuk

    teemuk Member

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    It will work.

    ...But since you can really only parallel/series input or output transducers of the tank you're not reverberating a reverb, so to speak. So you basically just get the variation from using more springs with differing tensions. It will create an effect of "thicker" reverb but it's not anything to write home about and it will not make you go WOW in comparison to just using a single, ordinary spring reverb tank. I think there will be diminishing returns from adding more and more springs to the system.

    Most tanks already have at least two rows of springs, most of them containing two springs of differing tensions. Some amps have three rows so it's already six springs, not to mention odd stuff like tapered springs of Baldwin amps. If there was astounding difference from adding more than four or six springs to the system then I'm ppretty sure that companies like Hammond or O.C. Electronics would have introduced such a tank ages ago.

    [​IMG]
     

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