Knocking the shine off of a Strat body

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by Brad Scott, Apr 26, 2016.

  1. Brad Scott

    Brad Scott Supporting Member

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    Assuming I wanted to do something as ridiculous as dulling the shine of a Strat body, what grit sandpaper (micromesh or similar) would I use?

    The doomed body in question is a Fender Custom Shop '56 NOS in Black. Nitro lacquer.

    I just want to give it a dull appearance - knock some shine off. A Closet Classic finish. No dremels, belt sanders or weed whackers needed.
     
  2. ahab

    ahab Member

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    What about playing it a lot? I know it seems obvious, but perhaps use it exclusively on gigs, rehearsals, etc. for a year and see what happens. I don't know about the sandpaper; sorry I can't be of any help there.
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2016
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  3. Jason_77

    Jason_77 Member

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    Be conservative. Start with 2000 and work through coarser grits as you need it. 1500 > 1000 > 800 etc. I doubt you'll have to go that low, though. If you feel you've gone too far, you can work back up through the finer grits.
     
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  4. VaughnC

    VaughnC Supporting Member

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    If you're going to disassemble the guitar, 0000 steel wool should work. You don't want to get steel wool particles into the pickups.
     
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  5. 1radicalron

    1radicalron Member

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    Yup, Steel Wool will do it nicely. Try 0000. Perhaps take everything apart first.
     
  6. 65DuoSonic

    65DuoSonic Member

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    That's a pricy Strat body to be experimenting on, but whatever floats thy boat. ;)

    Ironically, I have a closet classic CS '66 Strat that I kinda wish was glossier, like a NOS. It's gradually becoming a relic from wear and tear.
     
  7. PixMix

    PixMix Member

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    True words spoken here. ^

    There's a thread around here about a '72 Tele deluxe reissue getting a treatment. Look for it. 0000 steel wool, then a very light hand of polishing will do the trick.

    EDIT: Here's the link
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2016
  8. zeffbeff

    zeffbeff Member

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    I suggest just manhandling it. Leave it on a stand, in the sunlight, on the floor. Don't wipe it down. Abuse it when playing.
     
  9. PixMix

    PixMix Member

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    It will be the same after 10 years. I have a MIM tele that I got (almost) new. It's always out, sort of "next to the couch" guitar, and it's as new and shiny as it was when I got it 6 years ago. The new polyurethane formulas are pretty durable.
     
  10. 65DuoSonic

    65DuoSonic Member

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    The OP's guitar is a lacquer finished CS Strat though.
     
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  11. hank57

    hank57 Silver Supporting Member

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    Rub toothpaste all over it and then wipe it off. It'll smell great too!

    Just kidding, don't run tooth paste on a guitar.
     
  12. Chris Pile

    Chris Pile Member

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    DON'T! Use Scotchbrite pads instead. Steel wool loves static electricity generated by rubbing your guitar, and the magnets on your pickups. Also, as the steel wool crumbles, the little pieces can stick your fingers, get under your fingernails, and just be a pain in the ass in general. And lubricate the body with a little water and 1 drop of liquid soap. Stop and wipe occasionally to check your progress.
     
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  13. PixMix

    PixMix Member

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    Totally missed that.
     
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  14. rufedges

    rufedges Member

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    1500 to 2000 grit sandpaper, I agree. start on the back before and try it first. I like wet sanding myself, only takes a small bit of water. Be very careful if you use the steel wool if the guitar still has the pickups in it, the residue will go straight to the pickups.
     
  15. zztomato

    zztomato Supporting Member

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    Don't. That's just weird.
     
  16. Brad Scott

    Brad Scott Supporting Member

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    To each his own, tomato.
     
  17. copperhead

    copperhead Member

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    Extra fine steel wool
     
  18. K-Line

    K-Line Gold Supporting Member

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    No sandpaper. I use Mirlon Mirka 2500 scuff pads. You can get them an Amazon for like $25 but will have a life time supply for you and all your friends. Light pressure in a circular pattern.
    Mirka 18-118-449 25 pieces 4 1/2-Inch by 9-Inch Micro Fine Scuff Pads (Gold) 2500
     
  19. Brad Scott

    Brad Scott Supporting Member

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    Thanks, Chris!
     
  20. zztomato

    zztomato Supporting Member

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    Hey, that's Mr. Tomato to you, pal.
     

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