korg Nuvibe. the most unrated vibe

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by tristan klein, Mar 31, 2015.

  1. tristan klein

    tristan klein Member

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    Size matters after all ^^
     
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  2. NewDr.P

    NewDr.P Member

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    There's a lot of fantastic alternatives that don't cost $500, the size of a pedaltrain jr, and look like the control panel of an airplane.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  3. tristan klein

    tristan klein Member

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    You're unfair. It is not that big, and the only exotic controls you will find on it are the sliders. The "chorus / vibrato " footswich is a brilliant idea.
     
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  4. louis

    louis Supporting Member

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    Could you make a demo playing Bridge of Sighs
    with the right speed so we can really hear the throab ?

    That would be great !

    Hard to hear the vibe when playing high speed IMO
     
  5. bratch

    bratch Member

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    I went on a vibe-obsessed YouTube binge and the korg won based on demos. I, however, went with the black new fulltone. It's much less than half the price of the korg, and it sounds reasonably authentic.
     
  6. jermarcar

    jermarcar Supporting Member

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    I recently purchased a Nuvibe and initially, was not all that impressed. I wanted a vibe that was slightly slower. I decided to open it up for a look and noticed some trimpots, 4 in total. I located the pot I thought might be responsible for the speed and did a little tweaking. Needless to say, with 4 other pots to tweak I am not close to having it dialed in yet. However, just with the little I have done this pedal is unreal. Just a side note, doing it by yourself is very time consuming.
     
  7. Fredrocks

    Fredrocks Member

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    If the return is huge I would say it is worth it. I just scored a brand new Nuvibe for $334 with shipping, and I am stoked. How do you like the SDD-3000? I love having big boxes on my board when they kick ass.
     
  8. aaland_brian

    aaland_brian Member

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    It does the sdd-3000 thing amazingly, but as you will read there are volume differences in different modes. I will post my stay at home board someday, I would say about half the pedals are over sized and have ridiculous power requirements. But if I need to play out I have an H9 and a few drive pedals that can get the job done in a travel friendly format.
     
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  9. Fredrocks

    Fredrocks Member

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    I just purchased a Nuvibe: would you mind educating me on your internal pot tweaking adventures?
     
  10. bduguay

    bduguay Member

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    Hot Dog we have a Weiner! Iv nailed it IMO. I'm sure you could do double blind test with an original voiced similar and no one would notice the difference in performance but the minute some find out it's not based on a lamp/photo resist system, they become increasingly un-interested.
    B.
     
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  11. Kentano2000

    Kentano2000 Member

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    I need to hear a demo with a strat!! On the neck pickup!!! Adjusting the volume knob!!!!
     
  12. rufedges

    rufedges Member

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    That thing is massive. Sounds great though from the demos.
     
  13. jermarcar

    jermarcar Supporting Member

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    So, several people have asked for a follow up to the post addressing adjusting internal trim pots on the Nuvibe. Just to be clear, do this at your own risk and please adhere to proper safety precautions for working on electronics. The trim pots must be accessed a couple of layers down. Here r the instructions:

    1. Turn pedal upside down. Remove all screws from the back plate and set plate aside leaving battery tray. Remove battery tray from hole cutout in 1st layer circuit board and lay behind enclosure. Leave battery tray connected to the circuit board for now.

    2. Remove rear 1/4" jack inserts and rear plastic power supply clip. Gently squeeze together wings of the plastic mounting posts on the 1st layer circuit board and lift and dislodge board.

    3. Lift first circuit board slightly and push to the side to access black vinyl coated wire retaining clip holding bundle of wires near the silver foil on 2nd layer circuit board. Remove retaining clip. Be careful with the foil do not press or put pressure on the backside as sharp soldered through hole components can puncture foil. Leave bundle of wires beneath second circuit board and tucked in beside mounting post.
    http://i1220.photobucket.com/albums/dd454/jermarcar/IMG_0324.jpg

    4. You can now lift up first circuit board. Unplug the battery tray and lay aside. I found it best to lightly wiggle the connector while I pulled. Tilt 1st layer circuit board up behind enclosure and allow board to hang from wires at close to a 90 degree angle.
    http://i1220.photobucket.com/albums/dd454/jermarcar/IMG_0340.jpg?t=1543034303

    5. Underneath the silver foil, there are holes through the second circuit board to adjust the trim pots. Small white plastic spacers are on the foil mounting screws beneath the foil. They are there to keep the foil from being punctured. Be careful not to loose them under the second circuit board and do not pull mounting screws out of the foil (so you do not lose the spacers). Mine only had 3 spacers as the outside corner screw did not have one. Loosen completely all four mounting screws without removing from foil. Lift foil with screws intact and set aside. One trim pot belongs to intensity pot and the other belongs to the speed pot. The hole that sits almost directly over the intensity control is actually the speed trim pot.
    http://i1220.photobucket.com/albums/dd454/jermarcar/IMG_0331.jpg, http://i1220.photobucket.com/albums/dd454/jermarcar/IMG_0325.jpg?t=1543034551

    6. Place the enclosure with the face in a vertical position (stomp switches closest to floor) and lean the 1st layer circuit board away from enclosure in a sort of V shape. Do not let the 1st layer board make any contact with the enclosure. Keep the bottom about an inch away. Make sure to push the first circuit board to the side to leave space to adjust trim pots. http://i1220.photobucket.com/albums/dd454/jermarcar/IMG_0341.jpg?t=1543034662

    7. Plug in power supply and power up pedal, but do not engage effect or plug in cords into jacks. You will see the signal travelling across the sliders. You can now adjust the speed pot to the setting you desire. If you are facing the back of the pedal or the guts of the pedal adjust the trim pot clockwise to slow the speed. Just watch the speed of the travelling signal in the slider lights. Make sure to set the speed control on the front to the slowest setting before adjusting the trim pot. I set the trim pot so that the light just barely came to a complete stop in the sliders. I found that going any further increased the rate of increase (increased the acceleration on a exponential curve) of the log taper of the speed pot. In turn, that made it harder to dial in speeds at the apex of the curve as the further I turned the trim pot the more the apex veered towards 90 degrees.

    8. Remember to plug battery tray back in and mount wire retaining clip before securing 1st layer board when reassembling. Also only holes that receive screws are threaded. So, don't panic if you forget where they go. However, to insure you don't miss anything or get something wrong take pictures of each layer before removing parts.

    Finally, I did not mess with the intensity pot; and, I believe there were 2 more trim pots on the 1st layer board. So, if anyone does mess with them or figure them out that would be great to hear.
    Anyway, good luck and if you have any questions PM me.
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2018
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  14. Brian Corbett

    Brian Corbett Member

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    Awesome! Thank you so much, Jer. Not all heroes wear capes. Unless of course you’re wearing a cape for some reason
     
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  15. Brian Corbett

    Brian Corbett Member

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    Jer's method for reducing the rate worked beautifully. I didn't want to mess with the intensity trim pot because I love the way it sounds as-is and I think the range is perfect. As for the other trim pots, I would venture a guess that one is overall volume, not sure about the other trim pot. Maybe wet/dry vibrato mix? I was really tempted to mess with it but chickened out
     
  16. P8t8r

    P8t8r Member

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    Any love for it? I can buy one new for about 200USD.
     
  17. exodus

    exodus Member

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    I didn't really care for it. But if you want something highly adjustable, it can certainly do it.
     
  18. neilslade

    neilslade Member

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    Per the trim pots on the 1st layer- PLEASE SEE MY LAST POST IN THIS THREAD.

    YOU CAN GET UNITY GAIN and ABOVE with this pedal and effect engaged.
    To do so you MUST use any buffered pedal in front of the Nuvibe (effect off or on, doesn't matter) Then you'll find the pedal has plenty of effect engaged volume and more.

    Neil
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2019
  19. neilslade

    neilslade Member

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    SEE MY LATER POST AFTER THIS

    So I adjusted the speed trim to slow it down at the slowest- EXCELLENT suggestion- and it's not as complicated as the instructions might have you think. It's no more than 3 minutes to get to the trim pots, a minute to adjust, and 3 or 4 minutes to re-assemble. Make sure you GROUND yourself first (touch something metal) so you don't fry any components by errant static electricity.

    You simply remove the nuts holding on the input/output/expression jacks, remove the screw holding the plastic AC cord wraparound grommet in place (next to the AC jack), unplug the battery wires inside (this can even be done with the top circuit board in place if you are patient, use your fingernail), pinch the top of the two white plastic post circuit board holders together (they secure the bottom of the top circuit board in place), and move the top circuit board out of the way. Remove the four screws holding the silver sheet in place, and adjust the top trim for speed as described in the post above. This takes all of ten minutes to do everything. Be careful, don't let any part of the circuit board touch anything else when the power cord is put it, don't let it short out.

    I adjusted mine, starting with the speed knob at minimum, to just at a dead stop. With that adjustment, the speed knob will run the pedal from no speed to full speed at maximum, nothing is lost at the high speed, and everything is gained (from dead stop) at the minimum.

    I have the full range of speed- why on earth this wasn't done this way at the factory I don't know. There seems to be absolutely no down side to getting this full range of speed, and it all works with the expression pedal as well.

    Now here is something MAJOR I discovered: When you slow it way down, and adjust the INTENSITY knob on top the TONE of the wave form moves around bit- so that changing the intensity level not only changes the overall expected intensity of the throb and effect- but it ALSO changes where the low and high EQ portions align with the red faders- you actually change where to tone changes in respect to the wave form. This changes how much mid and low EQ you hear depending on the fader position. This was entirely unexpected-- it's actually GREAT.

    For those interested, I have a Novavibe handmade 1st class Mk IV Univibe Clone by ThirtyThird Effects which many say is the hands down best Univibe anyone makes, and even an improvement upon the originals. The difference between this Nuvibe and that pedal is very minimal- the advantages of the Novavibe pedal is that it has a little more gain on tap above unity, and allows some subtle variations between various generations of original Univibes (Shin-ie 1, 2, and 3, plus Vibro and Resly). On the other had, the Nuvibe gives you greater throb at minimal speeds, plus the ability to tweak and modify the wave forms beyond the standard Univibe. Also, noted, the Nuvibe runs on a regular 9volt wart, or 6 AA batteries. It's about the size of the original Univibe, 10" X 6.75" X 2.5" high. The Novavibe MkIV needs it's own 24volt wart, but is a little smaller at 7.5" X 5" X 3.25" high. ThirtyThird makes a small Mark IV with a little less adjustment (nothing of any real consequence) and lack of expression pedal jack. Both work just fine without the expression pedal.

    Either pedal is first class, and the Nuvibe does not take a back seat to the best Univibe- (with a buffer pedal, admittedly) either original or the Novavibe clone. Price wise, I got my Nuvibe used in mint condition from Guitar Center for $300 (included speed expression pedal), and that included tax and shipping. That was the least expensive I've seen these pedals go for, I was lucky. The Novavibe was about $100 more, and I had to build my own speed expression pedal from a gutted Crybaby plus parts, about $50 to do that.
    UPDATE- took the Guitar Center Pedal back, and found one MINT on Reverb for $225 plus $20 shipping. Yippee!

    The wave form sliders do allow for a tremendous amount of variability to the core effect. I've seen some comments in reviews of this pedal saying that they don't make any difference-- ?!?!? Ridiculous, the sliders allow for a huge variety of throb variations, and something no other vibe pedal offers. This is a VERY unique vibe because of these sliders, while still maintaining the ability to act like a typical Univibe.

    Korg got it right- the nailed it, and beyond. A VASTLY underrated vibe pedal. Not cheap, especially if you pay new retail, however.

    Just to mention, I did give an extensive test to the Drybell Vibe Machine V2, but it took 30 minutes to adjust to make it sound right, and you need a little screwdriver to get access to all the tweaks available via micro trim pots. I wasn't blown away with it's $275 price, despite its minuscule size, and it didn't sound much better, if at all after all the adjustment, than my Voodoolabs Microvibe- which incidentally sounds fantastic, and isn't much bigger. This despite all the hype the Drybell pedal seems to have gotten. And Drybell won't work on a battery, unlike Microvibe and Nuvibe.

    I've also tested the Fulltone MDV3, which is an excellent sounding basic pedal, but does not have a way to predictably control the speed with a manual knob, and requires it's own 18v wart only (no battery operation). It is relatively compact for having an expression pedal as part of the package, however compared to the bigger Nuvibe and Novavibe pedals.

    I have a modded Microvibe which allows a little greater depth and greater speed range over the stock Microvibe. It has a VERY VERY slightly different core EQ than the Nuvibe and Novavibe- which are both perfectly transparent other than the effect, but it is a perfectly great sounding vibe pedal, plus it's dirt cheap. Obviously, if you are using a vibe effect, you don't expect it to sound like an un-affected guitar anyway. If you don't want to spend a lot of money, it's my hands down recommendation, and it holds up exceedingly well against these other boutique pedals, and I happily used it for years- and will continue to hold onto it, given it's regular pedal size, and it's battery operation.

    Neil
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2019
    Jim Marciano likes this.
  20. neilslade

    neilslade Member

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    For $200--?!? Killer. You won't do better for any Univibe, as long as the size of the pedal doesn't matter to you.
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2019

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