LDC vs. SDC for Recording Acoustic Guitar

Discussion in 'Recording/Live Sound' started by ap1, Jun 22, 2006.


  1. ap1

    ap1 Member

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    Hi Folks,

    It's my understanding that SDC mics are preferred for recording acoustic guitars, but it's not entirely clear to me why this is the case. If anyone can explain, I'd really appreciate it.

    I currently have a Rode NT2-A, which I've used to record both my acoustic and vocals. I'm happy with the job it does on both, but I'm in the market for another mic so I can record guitar and vox simultaneously. Based on what I've researched, it's likely to be a SD that I can dedicate to the axe, while I continue to use the Rode for vox. But again, I'd like to know why SD's are preferred for acoustics. Also, if anyone has any suggestions for a decent SC, I'd appreciate it. Probably in the $300-500 range, but I'd really like something that's well-known for its professional use on acoustic guitars.

    I'm also curious whether anyone out there has experience with the NT2-A, and their thoughts on it.


    Thanks folks,
    Alan
     
  2. retro

    retro Member

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  3. MichaelK

    MichaelK Member

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    They're just different. I use them both sometimes, but for just one mic I usually reach for a small one. A small diaphragm gives me a closer, more intimate sound and a large diaphragm, while I still use it fairly close, gives a more open, ambient sound.

    In a dense rock/pop mix I think a well-placed single small mic sits well. For a more open acoustic sound the combination works well.
     
  4. loudboy

    loudboy Member

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    Original AKG 451 (not the reissue) on E-Bay.

    Neumann KM-184.

    I've been using one of these, as well as a Soundelux E-47, w/good results.

    Good Luck,

    Loudboy
     
  5. Realfi

    Realfi trying to re-MEMBER

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    IME it depends an awful lot on the guitar and the application.

    If only one mic is the option I've found that bassy Dreadnoughts often work better with SDCs and '00' or '000' style boxes can benefit from a big one.

    At present at home I only have one Mic-a Rode K2 and I find it helps to narrow the variable pattern a bit to avoid boominess on my J45.
     
  6. elambo

    elambo Member

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    True!
     
  7. elambo

    elambo Member

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    Agreed!
     
  8. LSchefman

    LSchefman Supporting Member

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    SDCs are inherently more linear due to the physics of large v small diaphragms, and they are also capable of better transient response. Instruments often benefit from this set of characteristics, especially plucked instruments like guitars, and instruments like pianos and cymbals.

    LDCs work well for vocals because the coloration inherent in LDs often complements the voice. They also work well for "vocal" sounding instruments like saxes, and big boomy stuff like kettle drums and basses. But either can work in either application, given the right instrument/voice/mic combination. Like everything else in recording, it's often a matter of taste and style.

    Since you already have an LDC you like, an SDC might be a nice addition to your rig.
     
  9. ap1

    ap1 Member

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    Excellent - Thanks all!
     

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