Lead Guitar Instruction

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by Janglin_Jack, Mar 29, 2008.

  1. Janglin_Jack

    Janglin_Jack Member

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    I am finally at a decent level of playing, I can play most rock songs, but I use tab as a crutch. I can make up some solos during a jam, but run out of real solo ideas fast. I grasp the idea of modes and can figure out the proper scales to use for various progressions. My quest now is to better learn the fretboard in the context of actuals solos, not scale practice. More real world use not excercises, etc.

    I have spent lots of time learning songs and solos, but that seems more memorization. I need something that takes me to the next step for composing my own solos with some logical steps, etc. Can anyone suggest some DVD or Books/CD's that can help. I have some Jamie Aebersold Jazz books that I haven't gotten into yet. I want to learn in the context of Rock music and maybe Blues Rock. I want to become more of a more complete player and be able to find something tasty to play on the spot over various styles of music, (Rockabilly, Classic Rock, Rock, etc). I know I am asking a lot, but there has got to be a good concise book to cover this bit.

    Thanks,
    Jack
     
  2. statesm

    statesm Member

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    I would say that just learning other peoples' solos isn't really far enough to get you where you want to be. For me, I did not just try to learn other guys' solos, but I tried to analyze what they were doing and when. For example, when I found a cool lick in a song I would not just try to play it, rather I would look at the context and the content. Does that make sense? Eventually I kinda learned how to fake another player's sound. I learned some tricks that Slash does, or Eddie etc etc. So you can go back and look at some of the things you have already learned and try to extrapolate more from them, rather than making them sound like the recordings. You will probably learn to play in different positions and see other cool ideas in different places...
     
  3. Janglin_Jack

    Janglin_Jack Member

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    Austinrocks,

    Thanks for that post. I know most of that information some more some less, but I have a pretty good foundation with what you presented.

    I opted for the Larry Carlton DVD lesson series, "335 Blues". I'll see where that gets me.

    Thanks again,
    Jack
     
  4. jezzzz2003

    jezzzz2003 Member

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    Get a good scales n modes book

    then get some DVD'S on your favourite players you idolise, it may seem out of reach but the more you practice and look up to these guys, the higher your end goal and the better player you will be,

    it happened quite easily for me because I had the drive to be the best I could be, the most complex and mind boggling licks I know now are the ones that I practiced for months on end and added my own spin on them are now the easiest and "most fun" because I can improvise them and add or subtract phrases and notes for some really cool sounding licks.

    Just do it, youll be glad you did :)
     
  5. Jon

    Jon Member

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    Have you tried hearing in your head what you want to play and then reproducing it on the guitar?

    Try this - if you have a backing track that you've played over before and felt like you've run out of soloing ideas, put it on and sing/hum solo ideas over it. For me at least, doing this yields strong rhythmic and melodic ideas and it's surprising how long you can keep going before you feel like you've run out of ideas.

    I would have said that the main challenge with this is translating what you hear in your head onto the instrument in real time, but if you also have trouble with hearing/humming the ideas and still feel like you've run out of ideas then that is probably a bigger problem - I'm not sure how you'd tackle that except by doing a lot of concentrated listening.
     
  6. Austinrocks

    Austinrocks Member

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    yeah backing tracks are what I mostly play to, it really good for developing you skills, guitarbt is really great.

    http://www.guitarbt.com/

    Jezz suggested a book of modes and scales I have the Guitar Gimore scales and modes, by Adam Kadom, but its really just patterns that you really cannot memorize, each scale has a summary page, and that is what I get out of the book, though playing the modes and scales is good so you know how they sound.

    As far as soloing techniques I find playing modally, my name I don't know if it has a real name, I just follow the chord progression, anchor my thumb on the note on the E or A string, and play the notes available in the location, I don't know mode patterns, but I do know keys, and find the notes in the key, if I am not sure or am playing something unfamiliar I will use the Pentatonic of the chord at that location, I am really suprised how well this works and I can come up with some interesting stuff. Anchoring the thumb is not important, however when I don't I find I get stuck in one spot again.
     

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