Les Paul Axcess Studio with Floyd Rose

Jaddy

Member
Messages
651
I find myself lusting over a Les Paul Axcess with a Floyd Rose at the moment for some reason, but have never owned an instrument with a Floyd Rose. I've read a fair amount and understand that string changes and setups can be a bit challenging. What do you folks think of FL's? Too much bother? Super cool and heaps of fun?

Thanks...
 

AdmiralB

Member
Messages
3,060
Most of the "challenges" are not unique to locking systems, they're true of all floating bridge setups.

String changes are no big deal as long as you do one at a time (and stay with the same gauge and tuning). Setups can be time-consuming because there's more involved than just turning the intonation screw - you have to loosen the saddle locking screw, then move the saddle (tools like The Key help with this but are not mandatory), then lock it back down. But I can do a setup from 'scratch' in ten minutes or so.

The best thing one can do to help save time - and this is true for all floating setups - is make a blocking device. Depending upon the guitar, it can be something that fits between the back edge of the bridge and the body top, or between the front edge of the block and the rear edge of the spring cavity...doesn't matter. But something that, once setup to suit you, *just* fits. This allows you to tighten the springs without moving the bridge.

Then you can take the strings off, do what ever you want, string back up, and tune. Then remove the block and start reducing spring tension. When you're back in tune, you're back where you want to be.
 
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Jaddy

Member
Messages
651
Thanks AdmiralB, I'd heard of some using a blocking device while playing (though I don't think I'd be interested as I'd like the full up and down movement of the bar), but had not thought of it for string changing, etc.
 

Guitarworks

Member
Messages
12,540
Floyds with fine tuners and locking nuts are super-cool heaps of fun when intonated, set up to satisfy your preference, and none of the 6 strings are broken. They can be a headache getting them to that point, especially in a hurry.

I've had several Floyds. I prefer them to float at equilibrium, and sit down inside a recessed cavity on the body. This way, you get low, flat action, you can push them down and dive a long way, or pull them up a long way. To my mind, these 3 things are what they were engineered to do.

They are also the spongiest-feeling of soft-tails, and as such, they don't lend themselves well to certain licks. When you bend one string while fretting another and play both, the stationary note will go flat - your bending a string will pull the Floyd forward and cause the stationary note to go flat. That type of lick is better suited to a hardtail. Some will say all you need to do is tighten the springs in back, but then a Floyd stiffens up, acts more like fixed bridge, and loses a lot of the fun. There's always a tradeoff with a Floyd.
 

s2y

Member
Messages
20,615
They're great if you set it and forget it with tuning/string gauge. Making changes SUCKS. I'll pay my shop to avoid the headaches, frustration, cussing, and throwing things. ;) One thing that helps with string changes is using long lasting coated strings. Elixers made a Floyd much less of a pain than it used to be.
 

Tone_Terrific

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
38,159
There's always a tradeoff with a Floyd.
So true.
Make sure that you want what it does best and can pay for that through deceased effectiveness in other functions.
That said, you can set them up super stiff if you need that and still get some wiggle out of them... so don't reject a guitar just because of the FR.
And, the Axcess is very cool, FR or not.
I like them high, non-recessed. Another YMMV.
 




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